Post Reply Tales of Wedding Rings chapter 13 grammar issue.
Posted 2/13/16
So unless the character itself is speaking Spanish, witch I doubt that what he suppose to be saying.
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Posted 2/13/16

KarenAraragi wrote:

So unless the character itself is speaking Spanish, witch I doubt that what he suppose to be saying.


Could be "ORA"?
Posted 2/13/16

eyeofpain wrote:


KarenAraragi wrote:

So unless the character itself is speaking Spanish, witch I doubt that what he suppose to be saying.


Could be "ORA"?


Could be but with L on there, will make the mistake make less sense. I check on other sites and they have happens instead of any of those.
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Posted 2/15/16

eyeofpain wrote:


KarenAraragi wrote:

So unless the character itself is speaking Spanish, witch I doubt that what he suppose to be saying.


Could be "ORA"?


I found a raw, and it is indeed "Hora".
Posted 2/16/16

arimareiji wrote:


eyeofpain wrote:


KarenAraragi wrote:

So unless the character itself is speaking Spanish, witch I doubt that what he suppose to be saying.


Could be "ORA"?


I found a raw, and it is indeed "Hora".


Well OK, but they need to fix the L to R then.
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Posted 2/16/16

KarenAraragi wrote:

Well OK, but they need to fix the L to R then.

Given the way the Japanese tend to interchange "R" and "L" when dealing with other languages, if they literally spelled out "Hora" using Latin alphabet, they probably didn't mean "Hora".

Although "Hola" in Spanish would be a bit strange in that circumstance, given that it is a greeting, we also have to keep in mind that they sometimes use foreign words just because they sound cool (especially in manga and anime) without much regard to their meaning.

If it were "Hora" in Japanese, however, then it should have been translated "Look!", "See!", or something similar.

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Posted 2/16/16

TheAncientOne wrote:


KarenAraragi wrote:

Well OK, but they need to fix the L to R then.

Given the way the Japanese tend to interchange "R" and "L" when dealing with other languages, if they literally spelled out "Hora" using Latin alphabet, they probably didn't mean "Hora".

Although "Hola" in Spanish would be a bit strange in that circumstance, given that it is a greeting, we also have to keep in mind that they sometimes use foreign words just because they sound cool (especially in manga and anime) without much regard to their meaning.

If it were "Hora" in Japanese, however, then it should have been translated "Look!", "See!", or something similar.



I was thinking more like this kind of 'Ora'.
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Posted 2/16/16 , edited 2/16/16

eyeofpain wrote:


TheAncientOne wrote:


KarenAraragi wrote:

Well OK, but they need to fix the L to R then.

Given the way the Japanese tend to interchange "R" and "L" when dealing with other languages, if they literally spelled out "Hora" using Latin alphabet, they probably didn't mean "Hora".

Although "Hola" in Spanish would be a bit strange in that circumstance, given that it is a greeting, we also have to keep in mind that they sometimes use foreign words just because they sound cool (especially in manga and anime) without much regard to their meaning.

If it were "Hora" in Japanese, however, then it should have been translated "Look!", "See!", or something similar.



I was thinking more like this kind of 'Ora'.


TheAncientOne: It was more likely the Japanese "hora", given that it was in hiragana (ほら) rather than katakana (ホラ).

eyeofpain: I suspect they're one and the same - in at least a few favorite songs, I've mistaken "hora" for "ora" until seeing the lyrics.

~~~~~

Just a thought with respect to "Look!" being usable as a way of declaring a strike on someone... remember, "urusai" literally just means "noisy", but it's frequently used to mean "Shut up". I wish languages were always literal, but they constantly evolve to include new concepts and metaphors. (I still can't get over the new meaning of "salty", myself. (^_~))
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