First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
Post Reply How do you even get good at maths
8701 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Definitely not EU
Offline
Posted 2/15/16
I feel like I'm literally being fucked right now against my consent. I can do the basics but when it comes to Algebra and simplifying this and all these brackets and shit just...I wan't my grade not join Nasa. But I need to do it.
Posted 2/15/16 , edited 2/15/16
become asian
6155 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M / Darkest Africa
Offline
Posted 2/15/16 , edited 3/1/16
You will always hear that some people are "good at maths". It is a myth made up by people who call themselves "bad at maths" as an excuse to sit back and not study.

There is only one way. You must study, study, study. Do as many exercises as possible. Preferably use multiple textbooks. Look at how a theory is applied in the sciences and do some problems from their textbooks if you can: Many textbooks will have some introductory chapters on the relevant mathematics. It is often a special case of the more general mathematical theory and may greatly help your understanding.

Unfortunately universities squeeze too much work into just a few years. It isn't really their fault; there is simply too much to learn. You will need to put in extra hours. Possibly take a sneak peak at what you will be doing later on, especially during holidays between semesters. (If you can muster the discipline.)

Ask questions in class. Always do the required reading (that literally no-one ever does ) before class. Discuss the work with your peers and make use of the TAs. Try taking some MOOCs before your class even starts; even if you only listen to the videos it helps enormously to have seen something before.
11622 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
40 / M / USA
Offline
Posted 2/15/16 , edited 2/15/16
Math is easier than people think. I mean you're bound by set rules and formulas when it comes to lower level math so you know what you're dealing with. Memorize the formulas and learn to identify when each is needed. Work out different scenarios for each one so that you can recognize which needs to be applied and how.

I've seen the shit they teach in public schools these days in the US. It's literally the same shit with a different twist each time. Practice makes perfect.
22653 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / USA
Online
Posted 2/15/16
Practice. I just spent a lot of extra time practicing problems until it started clicking.

Whiteboards and youtube videos can be useful. Fixing problems you got wrong can also be helpful.

11668 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / M
Offline
Posted 2/15/16
As my math and physics teachers would always say to the class, it goes beyond simple memorization. You have to think about where concepts are coming from and how to apply them.
599 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
26 / M / Connecticut
Offline
Posted 2/15/16
Honestly I would take the time to learn it because IF you decide to go to college (or already in college), they will be VERY useful.... unless you study something useless
18092 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
16 / F
Offline
Posted 2/15/16
I used to be in the best class of maths in my school. You know, the "prodigy class" where definitely 50% of the class would be either an engineer, economists, scientists, mathematicians, doctors, etc. I felt so out of place, my grades were utter shit. I didn't know why I was placed in that class, I lasted 4 years of much suffering until the end of middle school.

It was the worst experience, the teacher always praised the best students and encouraged them to have a maths-related career. When I told her I wanted to drop a level, she said "okay, it would be the best for you".

The next day I changed class and she told me "good luck Adrienne"....For Goodness' sake she totally forgot my name, I felt so outraged that she didn't have the decency to even remember a student she had had for four entire years.

And now, I'm one of the best kids in the intermediate maths level. I think it was just matter of changing your environment. I realised I wasn't bad at maths, the problem was that everyone just excelled and were brilliant in the other class.
2220 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 2/15/16
If you do exactly what the text book says, it'll work every time. The thing about rules is that they apply literally all the time. (e.g. 1+1 = 2 and it will always turn out that way every time you do it). If it doesn't work, you are missing a step or just not doing the rule correctly. There's never a situation where it doesn't make sense. You just don't do it right. In your case, I am assuming you haven't made an attempt to memorize what the notations mean in equations. Pull out the book, and look at it until you know it.

Physics is where it gets actually hard when you are basically trying to challenge or discover rules yourself.

Of course I always hated math even though I got good grades at it. It's so painfully boring that I'd just straight up not do any of my homework and then piss off my teachers when I got a 100 on the tests. My statistics professor was especially mad about that when I was in undergrad. She'd always put these trick questions on the test, and I could tell she was trying to trip me up. At the end the whole class would fail, but I would get it right anyway. Then she asked me to tutor people in the class, and I was like git fucked.
Posted 2/15/16
I love mathematics. I also like the way various cultures come to their concluded resolutions. I found that the way the Japanese study math is very simple and something I personally understand more than the ways I was taught where I come from.

All you need to do is study, but it can also help to find a more personal way to problem solve. Like the equations and questionnaires themselves, their are multiple ways to answer and solve.
6155 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M / Darkest Africa
Offline
Posted 2/15/16

ZiggyPlayedGuitar wrote:
I found that the way the Japanese study math is very simple and something I personally understand more than the ways I was taught where I come from.

Care to elaborate?
Posted 2/15/16

loremipsumdolor wrote:


ZiggyPlayedGuitar wrote:
I found that the way the Japanese study math is very simple and something I personally understand more than the ways I was taught where I come from.

Care to elaborate?


You can find Japanese mathematics tips everywhere. Most especially on YouTube. Quickest way I got through math in secondary school.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-P5RGdjICo
31119 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M
Offline
Posted 2/15/16
Bleh, I took four years of math in college. Physics was always way cooler; even (especially?) the complicated, three-page-long-equation stuff that breaks my brain.

Anyway, as others have pointed out, it's mostly just practice. Sometimes a different approach can help as well.. Most problems can be solved in more than one way, and where one approach just isn't working for you, another may click inside your head right away.
15742 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M
Offline
Posted 2/15/16
Practice. Practice. Practice. And more practice.
3234 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / F / Everywhere
Offline
Posted 2/15/16
There was a study somewhere that showed how people who were naturally good at math used a different part of their brain when solving math problems, so those "math genius" people who never need to study actually just have brains that are wired a bit differently. There's no changing something like that, so my best advice is to practice and ask the teacher for clarification on anything that doesn't make sense.
First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.