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addressing people!
Posted 2/25/16
Ok this my first topic so go easy on me?
>Here's my question about addressing people?
first example > I go to grocery store and the boy at counter does not know me? I pay for my things he say's to me thank you hunny?? know first of all i am not his honey? or thanks hun.

other example i go to 7-11 again i get called np -sweety? calling me by these terms to me is not ok?
what every happen to thank you miss or just thank you very much?
*so here is my question have manners just gone to hell what are they teaching kids today?*
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29 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 2/25/16 , edited 2/25/16
I don't know depends on where you are. I visited the South once. And I seemed to notice these terms of endearment seem to be the standard greetings and partings regardless of the gender of the parties involved.

Etiquette is a funny thing and changes from place to place. Expecting a country like the Untied States which is a melting pot of international cultures to adhere to a standardized version of it...is frankly foolish ya dig.
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23 / M / Aberystwyth, Wale...
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Posted 2/25/16
A shop assistant addressing a stranger as "honey" or "sweetie" doesn't seem like poor manners, it seems like a cultural idiosyncrasy. Is this a feminist thing?
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20 / Cold and High
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Posted 2/25/16 , edited 2/25/16
We all need a drop of your honey bby!

but yeah maybe it was a bit of a joke (depends on how things went and maybe he was a bit nervous if he thought you was looking great so tried to use something "sweet"? also those who stand there all day can get lonely)
agian really depends on how things went, and you never know what calling another or name could be triggering... etc..
Posted 2/25/16
I've been called that too except I didn't think much of it

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25 / London, England
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Posted 2/25/16 , edited 2/25/16
It depends on the situation and locations, similar to what Ranwolf said.
I am not really offended by such things unless it was aimed to be rude... but even then I find I have better stuff to worry about than to get too annoyed about it.

Nice manners is lovely to see and hear but a bit of casualness doesn't hurt, we're all human at the end of the day...Well, some of us.
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46 / F / Reston, VA, USA
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Posted 2/25/16 , edited 2/25/16
Sorry, but I find the old fashioned terms of endearment sweet.

Here in the Baltimore, MD, area it's common to hear some people call everyone "Hon." So much so that we hold Honfest every year so we can laugh at ourselves about it. http://honfest.net/

In the Deep South, strangers call me Honey, Sugar, Sweetheart, etc.

Up North I have been called Sweetums, and Puddin'.

Out West, Darlin' was more common.

I've been called "Ma'am" more times than I can count in all parts of the country.

Now it all depends upon the intonation and the context, but 90% of the people who do this don't mean anything by it except a compliment. The other 10% are trying to get too friendly. If someone is giving me the elevator eyeballs or being creepy about it, I'll tell them to cut it out and call me Ma'am because I'm not their ANYTHING. But most of the time I just let it roll off and enjoy the local colloquialisms.
Posted 2/25/16 , edited 2/25/16
I get mixed up for being a female quite often due to the length of my hair.

Tho other than that I've never really heard anyone call me a weird name.

I just ignore them even if they did.
Posted 2/25/16
I feel sweety and honey words i save for my husband something special but, hearing it from unknown store clerks or others just does not sit well with me.
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Posted 2/25/16

ck1west wrote:

I feel sweety and honey words i save for my husband something special but, hearing it from unknown store clerks or others just does not sit well with me.


Come up with more personal nicknames for ya loved ones, instead of using the most widely used ones. My Girlfriend calls me Doodle.
Posted 2/25/16 , edited 2/25/16

ck1west wrote:

I feel sweety and honey words i save for my husband something special but, hearing it from unknown store clerks or others just does not sit well with me.


You're taking it too seriously. A majority of those people that say that stuff are just trying to be nice. Take the compliment and be on with your day.
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20 / Cold and High
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Posted 2/25/16 , edited 2/25/16

stars201 wrote:
I've been called that too except I didn't think much of it
aawh honey don't you atleast take the time for my words?
After you hearing my voice it will clang right into your memory forever!

Razor_Girl wrote:
In the Deep South, strangers call me Honey, Sugar, Sweetheart, etc.
Out West, Darlin' was more common.
I've been called "Ma'am" more times than I can count in all parts of the country.
oh dear, a madam like you would allways be a real sugarbun now take a seat, please


Alix_rose wrote:
My Girlfriend calls me Doodle.
Can I call you Nudle?

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46 / F / Reston, VA, USA
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Posted 2/25/16
This thread reminds me of an old comedy routine - "You can call me..." which could go on and on frequently ending in something like "Just don't call me late for dinner!" Here's a link to the most basic version of it: https://youtu.be/qoYsfbq3vMc

It is important for us to know name preferences of our friends, co-workers, and clients. If Richard prefers to be called by his middle name of Doug instead of the nickname Dick, and you insist on using the nickname, he won't be your client for long. If Bob prefers to be called Robert you should pay attention to the preference.

That being said, people in public places don't know your name and although etiquette would indicate that calling you Mr. or Ms. (last name) or Sir or Ma'am is the correct thing to do when one doesn't know the name of the individual they're dealing with - many people find that too impersonal. Additionally many people hate being called Ma'am - it makes them feel like they're viewed as an old woman, men don't like being "Mr. (last name)" because to them "That's my father, just call me George." So in many places people come up with a friendly term that will hopefully offend the least number of people but is more personal than Sir or Ma'am.
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40 / M / USA
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Posted 2/25/16 , edited 2/25/16

ck1west wrote:

Ok this my first topic so go easy on me?
>Here's my question about addressing people?
first example > I go to grocery store and the boy at counter does not know me? I pay for my things he say's to me thank you hunny?? know first of all i am not his honey? or thanks hun.

other example i go to 7-11 again i get called np -sweety? calling me by these terms to me is not ok?
what every happen to thank you miss or just thank you very much?
*so here is my question have manners just gone to hell what are they teaching kids today?*


I'm not sure about Los Angeles but in the southern states that would be perfectly normal. Either way, he wasn't being disrespectful. Maybe not appropriate, but certainly not disrespectful.
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16 / F
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Posted 2/25/16
I've been cat called a lot of times, and I've heard unpleasant words not even you want to hear.

I always try to be respectful to everyone, "treat others the same way they want to treat you".
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