Created by pinkhairedneko
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How likely is it that you will try to learn Japanese?
⅀☆☆☆☆☆Superhero: Creator
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Posted 2/28/16 , edited 3/12/16
MOVED!

This Japanese group is currently in progress, but feel free to ☆join☆ and make some suggestions!
웃♥유 Humanitarian Knight
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Posted 2/28/16 , edited 3/4/16
Lived in Japan for 4 years. Got semi-fluent and then moved back to the states. I'm currently fighting to keep my fluency up.
⅀☆☆☆☆☆Superhero: Creator
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Posted 2/28/16 , edited 2/28/16
I began learning but stopped about last month...
はじめまして、みんな!
⅀☆☆☆☆☆Superhero: Creator
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Posted 2/28/16
To be honest, speaking the language is fairly easy, but the writing is what kills you... Hiragana and Katakana only take you so far, but then there's what's know as Kanji...
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Posted 2/28/16

Kerensa wrote:

Lived in Japan for 4 years. Got semi-fluent and then moved back to the states. I'm currently fighting to keep my fluency up.


What did you do in Japan? Why did you come back?
I've been a bit wishy washy about moving to Japan, but the more I think about it, the more I'm pretty sure that I want to!

I haven't taken Japanese as a class for about two years now, so I definitely understand what you mean when you say you're fighting to keep your fluency, although I wouldn't say that I was ever fluent, but I digress....


conyete wrote:

To be honest, speaking the language is fairly easy, but the writing is what kills you... Hiragana and Katakana only take you so far, but then there's what's know as Kanji...

I LOVE kanji. My handwriting is terrible (even in Roman letters) so I have trouble with legibility, but I like kanji because I can write faster~
Plus I think it is so intriguing that characters have multiple meanings, and hilarious that they often mean totally different things in Chinese. My friend Hongji is alway trying to convince me to learn Mandarin, but I'm pretty sure I would get confused >.>

For me the hardest part of learning a new language is feeling like I am talking like a child due to my lack of vocabulary, knowledge of grammar, and ability to express my thoughts in Japanese to the extent that I am able to express them in English.


大変ですね~

☆Hero☆
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Posted 2/28/16
It's sure a tricky language to master for a westerner
☆☆Honored Hero☆☆
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Posted 2/28/16
i try and i have a service that sends me words every day. but i suck at keeping it up. if you guys want i can send the daily words over for the whole group
⅀☆☆☆☆☆Superhero: Creator
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Posted 2/28/16

C0mlink wrote:

i try and i have a service that sends me words every day. but i suck at keeping it up. if you guys want i can send the daily words over for the whole group


That's pretty cool; however,I think learning a language is easier if you know how to respond in a few basic situations, and then build from there. Getting caught up in the meaning of individual words makes learning a new language muuuuuuuch harder. At least for me~
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Posted 2/28/16

Abraham_Linkens_Sphere wrote:

It's sure a tricky language to master for a westerner


Mmmmmm I think it depends on the person. There are a lot of things about Japanese that are much easier than English for me :0
☆☆Honored Hero☆☆
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Posted 2/28/16


sure np. but the offer is open for anyone who want it.
웃♥유 Humanitarian Knight
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Posted 2/28/16

pinkhairedneko wrote:


Kerensa wrote:

Lived in Japan for 4 years. Got semi-fluent and then moved back to the states. I'm currently fighting to keep my fluency up.


What did you do in Japan? Why did you come back?
I've been a bit wishy washy about moving to Japan, but the more I think about it, the more I'm pretty sure that I want to!

I haven't taken Japanese as a class for about two years now, so I definitely understand what you mean when you say you're fighting to keep your fluency, although I wouldn't say that I was ever fluent, but I digress....



I went to Japan because I had always wanted to since my teenage years. I devoted myself to learning Japanese and to learning more about the country and culture. I stupidly majored in English with a minor in Linguistics for my undergrad thinking it would increase my chances on getting a job there (it's irrelevant, really. It helps... but... I worked in hiring teachers for the eikawa I worked at for about a year).

I loved every moment of living there, but as I increased in age my chances of finding a soulmate decreased (as a woman if you aren't married by 30, people tend to think something is wrong with you). I couldn't adapt to life as a stereotypical Japanese housewife that balances the books, cooks for hubby when he comes from work and the drinking parties. Nah, not my life. Not only that, but it's near impossible to plan for a retirement in that country as a foreigner. Most jobs don't give foreigners the legal amount of hours to be legally fulltime, so they don't have to offer you benefits (like paid vacation or personal time, a pension [equivalent of America's 401k], or more than 1 paid sick day per year). I didn't have a lot of money to do much, and my days off for 4 years stayed Sunday and Tuesday. I didn't get to go places because any day I took off from work meant I lost 10,000 yen from my monthly paycheck (you get paid once a month).

After 4 years I decided that I got tired of watching my debt form college increase due to the interest. I was getting more and more depressed, collection agencies from America found me and bugged me. I had to come home. If you have zero debt, Japan would be great. I thought I could do something I loved and get myself out of my student loan debt. I was wrong haha.

I had no qualms with being expected to fit in, understand customs, be a "woman" in the work place (make coffee, clean, etc). But it can be draining. I began getting anxiety because I felt like I was being watched because I looked different. People approached me wanting free English lessons. People would come up to me and tell me that they've always wanted to sleep with a foreigner. I loved my life there, and I wouldn't trade it for the world, but there's a lot that needs to change for foreigners there. The racism is still real.

Example:
[Me and some guys who talk kinda like Yakuza waiting for the light to change at the crosswalk]
Guy 1: Hey, Aniki, I bet that girl can't even understand what we're saying.
Guy 2: Probably not.
Me: *Glances over* I most certainly do.
(silence)
Guy 2 ("Aniki"): Hey, sorry for this idiot here (referring to his underling person). Hey, do you live here? (suddenly using polite Japanese)
Me: *rides away on my bike* Yes. Sorry, I gotta go. Bye.
⅀☆☆☆☆☆Superhero: Creator
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Posted 2/28/16 , edited 2/29/16


Oooooohhhh that would piss me off. Shit like that happens here as well though.
I actually think being a shufu could be kinda fun, except that I have no intention of getting married. Especially not before 30 >.> But I kinda knew most of that stuff since I used to talk to my Japanese Sensei during lunch. I don't have any debt, but I also don't want a "real" job by any means.
I'm studying lighting design for theatre, but I really just want to be a roadie~
I can pretty much do that anywhere that has bands, so I don't know that I would really stay in Japan for a long time. The retirement thing is a bit much. I don't want to work forever >.>

I kind of stalk a lot of ex-pats who live in Korea on Youtube hehe. I don't know why I haven't bothered to look for people who live in Japan.
In all honesty, I'm more concerned about having tattoos(none yet, but I want some) and super short hair than anything else.

On that note, I have been watching too much anime because as of 4 hours ago, I would like to work at a bookstore in Japan. #ihavenolife
웃♥유 Humanitarian Knight
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Posted 2/28/16 , edited 2/28/16

pinkhairedneko wrote:

Oooooohhhh that would piss me off. Shit like that happens here as well though.
I actually think being a shufu could be kinda fun, except that I have no intention of getting married. Especially not before 30 >.> But I kinda knew most of that stuff since I used to talk to my Japanese Sensei during lunch. I don't have any debt, but I also don't want a "real" job by any means.
I'm studying lighting design for theatre, but I really just want to be a roadie~
I can pretty much do that anywhere that has bands, so I don't know that I would really stay in Japan for a long time. The retirement thing is a bit much. I don't want to work forever >.>

I kind of stalk a lot of ex-pats who live in Korea on Youtube hehe. I don't know why I haven't bothered to look for people who live in Japan.
In all honesty, I'm more concerned about having tattoos(none yet, but I want some) and super short hair than anything else.

On that note, I have been watching too much anime because as of 4 hours ago, I would like to work at a bookstore in Japan. #ihavenolife


The one thing to keep in mind is that if you want to legally work in Japan, you need to have a minimum of a Bachelor's degree to be able to obtain sponsorship through a place of employment. Even if you are fluent in Japanese (N1 level, and you've passed all your kanji exams to prove you can read at a native level) you still will not find sponsorship if you're looking for a job outside of the educator role. The reason for this is you must be able to perform you can do that job better than a Japanese citizen, which is very hard to do for a foreigner unless it's in English as a second language education. The only way you could potentially work as a lighting engineer in Japan is if you could find a company in the country you live in that wanted to send you to Japan to work in that area of expertise. However, I'm all about breaking the mode, so if you can find a company to sponsor you for it DO IT. :D

Throughout my 20's I just kinda floated around. I took my time in college and I wasted time in Japan hah. I was hoping I'd get to see the country, and I did over the course of 4 years... but not nearly as much as I had wanted to. Just no time outside of work. The work ethic is pretty rigid. I'd go to work at 10AM for classes and leave work at 9:10PM. I didn't work the whole time, but the time in between classes wasn't long enough for me to go home. :(

I hate feeling like a party pooper when it comes to living in Japan because I LOVED it. It's just a little unbalanced for foreigners. I made about 2,000 dollars a month and the majority of it went to rent and taxes and insurance. I was spending more in taxes (city taxes) and insurance than I was for my rent haha. My rent was about 460 USD, my city taxes (that I had to pay separately at the conbini) were about 200 USD a month by the time I left and my insurance was about 260 USD a month by the time I left. National taxes were already removed from my monthly paycheck, and were at about 150 USD. Electric was about 40-60USD, gas was about 30 USD... Actually, I bet I still have my excel sheets for how much money I spent and how much I could spend "for fun" monthly if anyone is interested--and I was one of the few individuals who made more than a lot of the others who worked eikaiwa. XD
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Posted 2/29/16 , edited 2/29/16


I'm working on my bachelor's degree in design, it's just not what I plan on doing. It's boring >.<

I kind of live with a lack of money are free time anyway~ because most of the work I do is free and we call it "volunteering". (It's not really volunteering - it's a departmental requirement. Such is the life of a theatre major haha. I'm on campus for around twelve hours most days.

I don't think you're being a party pooper. It's good to know what to expect when traveling to other countries, whether you plan to live there or not ^.^
I'd actually love to see them if you wouldn't mind- I'm already on a pretty tight budget, and I live in a tiny town with very few activities free or otherwise. Actually part of the reason that I want to be a lighting technician is that it is a really fun job for me, and I occasionally skip classes on account of lighting needing help :sweatingbullets:

No matter what kind of day I am having, it is always so awesome to go up in the catwalks and stare down at the stage, hang lights, etc. I LOVE IT <333333333333333333333
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Posted 2/29/16

C0mlink wrote:



sure np. but the offer is open for anyone who want it.


C0mlink, I would love it if you were to send the whole family New Japanese words everyday. In fact, pm me on how do you think we can get this going!
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