Post Reply SAO NerveGear Work-Around?
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21 / M / Somewhere in Kansas
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Posted 2/29/16 , edited 3/1/16
Alright guys, time to break out the science!

Whether you liked it or not, you've probably seen a little of Sword Art Online. If not, this won't spoil anything because it's all introduced in the first episode. In SAO there is the notorious NerveGear, which is said to send off a large magnetic pulse into the brain, frying it, if you try to take it off or disconnect it from the internet. Surely there's no way around it, right? I think not. Here is my idea to tear down the plot of the first arc of the show:

NerveGear works by sending and receiving microwave signals to the brain. Microwaves are just a different form of light, so they can be absorbed, reflected, refracted, etc. My idea is find a microwave-transparent, but diamagnetic (blocks magnetic fields) material, and slip it between the helmet and the user. Normal features of the NerveGear would be able to function still and wouldn't be able to detect that there is something in between the person and the helmet because (supposedly) most of its features, including checking what's under the helmet, rely on microwaves, but once the thing is removed its magnetic pulse would fail to reach the person, rendering it harmless.

What do you guys think?
xxJing 
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32 / M / Duckburg
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Posted 2/29/16 , edited 12/4/17

pi_memorizer wrote:

Alright guys, time to break out the science!

Whether you liked it or not, you've probably seen a little of Sword Art Online. If not, this won't spoil anything because it's all introduced in the first episode. In SAO there is the notorious NerveGear, which is said to send off a large magnetic pulse into the brain, frying it, if you try to take it off or disconnect it from the internet. Surely there's no way around it, right? I think not. Here is my idea to tear down the plot of the first arc of the show:

NerveGear works by sending and receiving microwave signals to the brain. Microwaves are just a different form of light, so they can be absorbed, reflected, refracted, etc. My idea is find a microwave-transparent, but diamagnetic (blocks magnetic fields) material, and slip it between the helmet and the user. Normal features of the NerveGear would be able to function still and wouldn't be able to detect that there is something in between the person and the helmet because (supposedly) most of its features, including checking what's under the helmet, rely on microwaves, but once the thing is removed its magnetic pulse would fail to reach the person, rendering it harmless.

What do you guys think?


I think you are trying to smash a paper thin plot with an industrial strength sledgehammer.
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27 / M / This Dying World
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Posted 2/29/16 , edited 3/1/16
That is the same thing as taking off the helmet.

I thought it was the electrical discharge that killed the person.
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21 / M / Somewhere in Kansas
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Posted 2/29/16 , edited 3/1/16
@xxJing That's what makes it fun!

@AnimeKami I made sure to look it up, it's a "powerful electromagnet" that does the killing. Plus, because the material would be transparent to microwaves, the system that detects the removal would be unable to detect it.
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Posted 12/4/17 , edited 12/4/17
Maybe you could just add some kind of electromagnetic resistor... That way, it could still send signals to your brain about what's happening in the game, since it uses lower power microwaves into the brain in order fro it to function, so completely blocking the signals wouldn't allow it to fully work, right? ( You probably know more than me, I'm just guessing on that. ) But the microwave is going to to have to be decently powerful to completely fry your brain. Smaller microwaves like the ones used in the normal transmissions won't kill you, assuming their about the same signal strength as a smart-phone. I know that there is research that that radiation is bad, but if it were lethal bad, around 70% of the world would be dead because of phones. At least, this is what i think.

PS: Thanks for creating this thread. i love these kinds of science discussions on fictional stuff. It's always fun!
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29 / M
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Posted 12/4/17 , edited 12/5/17
Or mod the device, as many PC gamers do, sometimes for a competitive edge. Create a sort of kill switch or time delay trigger controlled by a 3rd party overlay program you can access from any VR game where you could just instantly cut all power to the NerveGear and thus not get killed by it. Could be a secondary feature of a mod designed to alter the timing to give you faster reactions in any given game.
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Posted 12/4/17 , edited 12/5/17
Really, the NervGear should not have been able to do anything at all. Microwaving takes time, much more than the time needed to remove the device. A damaging field would kill the battery almost instantly, and would trip circuit breakers from a draw source. The equipment is not large enough to house equipment that would fry your brain.

So the people who "died" had their equipment removed with an axe, chainsaw, sledgehammer, or other equipment. Not some tricked out MRI.
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Posted 12/4/17 , edited 12/5/17

xxJing wrote:


pi_memorizer wrote:

...

NerveGear works by sending and receiving microwave signals to the brain. Microwaves are just a different form of light, so they can be absorbed, reflected, refracted, etc. My idea is find a microwave-transparent, but diamagnetic (blocks magnetic fields) material, and slip it between the helmet and the user. Normal features of the NerveGear would be able to function still and wouldn't be able to detect that there is something in between the person and the helmet because (supposedly) most of its features, including checking what's under the helmet, rely on microwaves, but once the thing is removed its magnetic pulse would fail to reach the person, rendering it harmless.

What do you guys think?


I think you are trying to smash a paper thin plot with an industrial strength sledgehammer.


TBF, that sledgehammer is also literally paper thin.

My take would be to rely on expected latency in transmissions. Remove the NG immediately after packets are sent, while the NG is still listening for returns. (Moving them to hospitals might actually prove fatal, since they'd be out offline for many minutes.)
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Posted 12/4/17 , edited 12/5/17
I thought is was the microwaves that killed in the nervegear. Also microwaves constantly being used to scan the brain as well. So the microwaves were constantly there while the nervegear was on and in use(so the kill switch would probably be activated by any tampering of disruption to the scanning).

Also the microwave pulse used to kill doesn't have to fry the entire brain. Just one part for instant death or not even fry it just cause the electrical activity to be disrupted long enough for death to occur.

Think of the size of microwaves but with all the energy released in one spot. All the energy of say cooking an egg but focused to pinpoint accuracy all in one location(which the nervegiear is capable of because it scan brain activity in real time). Say one small part of the brain brought to boiling point. Or just the incoming blood heated, or the cerebral spinal fluid(then you are thinking about what it takes to heat water).

Brains are very fragile things, a small temperature change is enough to cause damage.If a vital part is disrupted death is instantaneous or near enough to it.

Nervegear also had internal batteries(future batteries anyone read speculation of the storage capacity of batteries in development). All the stored energy released in one go. Say the energy to run a home microwave for an hour used in an instant.

The entire brain does not have be targeted for the brain to be destroyed.

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Posted 12/4/17 , edited 12/5/17
Well you could also potentially jury-rig a connection from the nerve gear to a slightly less advanced VR system or control framework and not even put the nervegear on your head, instead using it by proxy via the other device. Some potential disadvantages and maybe even some advantages to that approach. Would also require some engineering and potential programming knowledge to pull off.
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Posted 12/7/17 , edited 12/8/17
Well, you could just take it apart, and install resistors in wherever it send the pulses, so then it can't make a super-strong pulse. That, or, uy an Amusphere, It's lighter, safer, and probably cheaper too.
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Posted 12/18/17 , edited 12/18/17
Did this thread just recently get made again?
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