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Post Reply 12yr old girl facing criminal charges for using certain emojis
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Posted 3/1/16 , edited 3/1/16

Freddy96NO wrote:


Morbidhanson wrote: Instead of reading books, they go online and read intellectual garbage full of leaps of logic and bad spelling and get all kinds of ideas about independence and not following societal norms.
or like me that has a hard time with such ;_; and others even though some is "gained" through screens and time used infront of it and what it does both physical and mentally for learning or thinking.



There's plenty of good stuff on line, but also a massive amount of complete drivel. People don't learn ideas just from good books. They also learn it from the garbage that is widely available online. And then there's social media full of inexperienced people trying to teach inexperienced people. Like blind people trying to tell each other where to go. More and more kids are going to school but they don't seem any more educated or sensible for it.
Posted 3/1/16

FruitPunchSamurai987 wrote:

I'm not going out without a fight!


I've got your back!

My opinion: The girl had no priors so she's not a criminal first of all. Social media is involved in everything so you can not just single out this case that's being ignorant. A smart officer would know by his judgement if this expression was a valid threat or not instead of just yell out threat threat bomb bomb. Finally, many threats have been ignored again because they have no basis or value to be considered a real threat. So, this teenage girl should not be an example made to all when she did nothing to call for such debasement.
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Posted 3/1/16

Dariamus wrote:


DeadlyOats wrote:

That's why "poisoned" was in quotes.

Even if crushed red chili peppers are not poisonous, she had hatred and vengeance in her heart when she did it. According to that article, she was already on a roll, doing acts of vengeance like that. Who knows how far she would have gone if the cycle had not been cut like it was?

There are more appropriate, misdemeanor level, charges that could be brought.

A felony level charge can still result in considerable time in a juvenile facility, which imposes a considerable hardship on the parents and does little for the juvenile save give them training and contacts with the truly criminal. I've seen first hand now negative this can be to a twelve year old. My brother spent almost a year in a facility at this age, and came out much worse than he was before going in. My mother, who was making barely enough to buy food, spent years paying off the fines assessed.



Whatever, she was a bad egg, and was becoming increasingly worse. Let this be a lesson to her. What you're describing is a broken institutional system. Needs to be fixed. That doesn't take away from the fact that the three girls needed to face the consequences for their actions, especially the ring-leader.

As for the thing with the emoji.... It seems she not only sent a message making a terrorist threat, but she tried to do so while impersonating another student.... Seems to me she wanted to cause trouble for the other student, but instead ended up in legal trouble herself. I don't know if impersonating someone else while committing a crime is also a crime, but damn....

If it turns out she was just trying to pull a prank on the other student, I hope it's all cleared up for her.... And let THAT be a lesson to her, too.

People! There used to be a time when we could say inappropriate things and rant with impunity. Back then, people knew they could take what you said with a grain of salt, and move on. However, this is the age of terrorism. We can't say such things anymore without triggering an anti-terror unit deployment.

Can you imagine it? Not just local law enforcement agencies were involved, but probably the FBI, as well. They probably did a totally, leave-no-stone-unturned investigation, looking through her computer, phone call logs with her carrier, emails, Instafacetwitterbook accounts, etc., AS WELL AS HER FAMILY AND FRIENDS' ACCOUNTS.

Sogno- 
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Posted 3/1/16
we should change all emojis to lasagna
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Posted 3/1/16

Sogno- wrote:

we should change all emojis to lasagna


Lasagna? That reminds me, I need to go buy some beers....
runec 
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Posted 3/1/16

DeadlyOats wrote:
Whatever, she was a bad egg, and was becoming increasingly worse. Let this be a lesson to her. What you're describing is a broken institutional system. Needs to be fixed. That doesn't take away from the fact that the three girls needed to face the consequences for their actions, especially the ring-leader.


They need consequences, sure. But raising what is essentially a malicious prank to the level of a felony based on stretching the letter of the law is certainly questionable. Especially if you realize there's a broken system involved her that will in all likelihood make her a worst person on the way out rather than a better one.



DeadlyOats wrote: I don't know if impersonating someone else while committing a crime is also a crime, but damn....


The second charge she faces is computer harassment, so yeah she's getting charged on that. I gather the person's name she posted under is the one that was bullying her though.



DeadlyOats wrote:People! There used to be a time when we could say inappropriate things and rant with impunity. Back then, people knew they could take what you said with a grain of salt, and move on. However, this is the age of terrorism.


Eh, you could never rant with impunity. Making threats has always been a crime. Sure, you could rant with impunity to your friends. But making a threat in any sort of public forum would certainly raise the ears of your local law enforcement. The main difference these days is social media gives it a faster turn around time and half the people using social media don't realize they're effectively speaking in public.

People who know you may take what you say with a grain of salt, but strangers don't know you thus don't have any reason to believe you are or are not serious. Nor are the authorities. They have to treat it seriously because regardless of how slim the chance may seem to be they can't take that chance.



DeadlyOats wrote:
They probably did a totally, leave-no-stone-unturned investigation, looking through her computer, phone call logs with her carrier, emails, Instafacetwitterbook accounts, etc., AS WELL AS HER FAMILY AND FRIENDS' ACCOUNTS.


.....Or they just tracked her down by IP address, got a search warrant, went to her house and asked wtf? To which she confessed. -.-


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Posted 3/1/16
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Posted 3/1/16

runec wrote:
They need consequences, sure. But raising what is essentially a malicious prank to the level of a felony based on stretching the letter of the law is certainly questionable. Especially if you realize there's a broken system involved her that will in all likelihood make her a worst person on the way out rather than a better one.

This.
This is the same paranoid mentality that leads to crowded prisons and personally something has to give.
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Posted 3/1/16

redokami wrote:

how about they spend their time on real fucking threats, not a 12 year old girl for fuck sake, what the fuck


I think the whole country is sensitive to school shootings, but charging criminal charges is how u mess someone up for something like this. It shoulda been mandatory psycho therapy to see what was up.

But I mean this shit isn't new, for like decades now, people who post shit on fb or whatever, and if it sounds serious, you can get charged for it.
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Posted 3/1/16

lambofgenesis wrote:


redokami wrote:

how about they spend their time on real fucking threats, not a 12 year old girl for fuck sake, what the fuck


I think the whole country is sensitive to school shootings, but charging criminal charges is how u mess someone up for something like this. It shoulda been mandatory psycho therapy to see what was up.

But I mean this shit isn't new, for like decades now, people who post shit on fb or whatever, and if it sounds serious, you can get charged for it.


except there is a hell of a lot of threats and bullying that still is ignored and ppl are killed or kill them selves
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Posted 3/1/16

runec wrote:


DeadlyOats wrote:
Whatever, she was a bad egg, and was becoming increasingly worse. Let this be a lesson to her. What you're describing is a broken institutional system. Needs to be fixed. That doesn't take away from the fact that the three girls needed to face the consequences for their actions, especially the ring-leader.


They need consequences, sure. But raising what is essentially a malicious prank to the level of a felony based on stretching the letter of the law is certainly questionable. Especially if you realize there's a broken system involved her that will in all likelihood make her a worst person on the way out rather than a better one.



DeadlyOats wrote: I don't know if impersonating someone else while committing a crime is also a crime, but damn....


The second charge she faces is computer harassment, so yeah she's getting charged on that. I gather the person's name she posted under is the one that was bullying her though.



DeadlyOats wrote:People! There used to be a time when we could say inappropriate things and rant with impunity. Back then, people knew they could take what you said with a grain of salt, and move on. However, this is the age of terrorism.


Eh, you could never rant with impunity. Making threats has always been a crime. Sure, you could rant with impunity to your friends. But making a threat in any sort of public forum would certainly raise the ears of your local law enforcement. The main difference these days is social media gives it a faster turn around time and half the people using social media don't realize they're effectively speaking in public.

People who know you may take what you say with a grain of salt, but strangers don't know you thus don't have any reason to believe you are or are not serious. Nor are the authorities. They have to treat it seriously because regardless of how slim the chance may seem to be they can't take that chance.



DeadlyOats wrote:
They probably did a totally, leave-no-stone-unturned investigation, looking through her computer, phone call logs with her carrier, emails, Instafacetwitterbook accounts, etc., AS WELL AS HER FAMILY AND FRIENDS' ACCOUNTS.


.....Or they just tracked her down by IP address, got a search warrant, went to her house and asked wtf? To which she confessed. -.-




No. That's not what I meant. Sure, they tracked her down quick, but I mean afterword. To see if she had been radicalized by ISIS or if she had contacts that had contacts of contacts of ISIS or some such....

That's going to have to be a matter for her attorney to show, but I got a feeling that the charge of poisoning is going to stick. She "altered" someone's drink. Apparently, in Florida anyway, it doesn't matter what the substance is. It could be vitamin C, and if it was done without permission and without the knowledge of the other, it seems that too would be considered "poisoning." Maybe her attorney could get the judge to sentence her to probation.

Starting with the beginning of the Patriot Act and the establishment of the Homeland Security Department, yeah. However, before then, teens could talk all kinds of smack and say all kinds of things, and nothing other than counseling in the Principle's office would result from it, maybe even a phone call to your parents to have a meeting with the teacher, principle, and the mouthy teen. Then 9/11 happened. Everything changed after that.
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Posted 3/1/16

Dariamus wrote:


DeadlyOats wrote:
and then there was that 12 year old girl that "poisoned" her teacher,


Yes, because we all know crushed red pepper is highly toxic. We should sue the grocery store for selling toxic substances to a minor. Or did the school cafeteria have the nerve to make such a dangerous substance readily available to students?



Except it was implied by the article that the teacher had an allergy to red pepper. Due to that fact poisoned would be a correct term.


From Merriam-Webster
Poison
: a substance that can cause people or animals to die or to become very sick if it gets into their bodies especially by being swallowed


Which if the leader of the three girls knew of this allergy, it could be considered an attempted murder.
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Posted 3/1/16
Maybe she was playing a game of Clue?
runec 
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Posted 3/1/16

DeadlyOats wrote:
No. That's not what I meant. Sure, they tracked her down quick, but I mean afterword. To see if she had been radicalized by ISIS or if she had contacts that had contacts of contacts of ISIS or some such....


Well, there's no evidence of this having occurred. The FBI don't appear to be involved and they didn't serve another docket to Apple so. >.>



DeadlyOats wrote:However, before then, teens could talk all kinds of smack and say all kinds of things, and nothing other than counseling in the Principle's office would result from it, maybe even a phone call to your parents to have a meeting with the teacher, principle, and the mouthy teen. Then 9/11 happened. Everything changed after that.


Ehh, not really no. School shootings predate 9/11. They predate the Internet as well. In fact they go back a rather alarming ways all things considered. They were putting metal detectors in schools in response to shootings as far back as 94 or so. Which in and of itself was the result of a federal mandate that was an attempt to reduce the amount of violence occurring in American schools.




runec 
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Posted 3/1/16

ZenZaku wrote:
Except it was implied by the article that the teacher had an allergy to red pepper. Due to that fact poisoned would be a correct term.


That appears to be the teacher being melodramatic. Anyone would have suffered those symptoms downing a bunch of red pepper flakes. If she had an real actual allergy to red peppers she would not have made it to that second sip.
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