Post Reply Giant Telecoms Are At It Again
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Posted 3/14/16
Here we go again. If we don't do something, then businesses like Crunchyroll will have to pay higher rates to the ISPs so that they can stream anime to us around the world. Plus you know, that like all businesses, that eventually those increased costs will be passed on to US, the anime fans.

If you want to do something about it, then click on the link on the bottom of my post to send a message to the FCC, and to leave a message to your elected representative.

This is a United States problem, but I know it will affect you folks overseas. Sorry that you can't help... However, if your telecom companies in your country is trying to pull the same stunt, maybe you could find a way to do something about it over there...


The FCC is deciding right now whether or not to let Comcast, Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile undermine net neutrality with total impunity.

These companies are trying to see if they can break the law in plain sight and get away with it. If they win, it will endanger the open Internet forever. But the FCC won’t act unless they see an overwhelming public response — help us submit 100,000 comments to the FCC in the next week.

Tell the FCC: Zero-Rating schemes violate Net Neutrality and threaten the open Internet. Don't let Comcast, Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile get away with breaking the law.

Net neutrality is the basic guiding principle that has made the Internet what it is today. It keeps powerful interests from slowing down or censoring content, and it’s what guarantees us access to the expanse of knowledge that makes the Internet revolutionary.

Last year, the FCC passed the strongest-ever protections for the open Internet, and it happened with such overwhelming public support that companies like Comcast and Verizon can’t publicly oppose net neutrality the way they used to.

Now, Comcast, Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile are trying to work around the rules by doing something called Zero-Rating, even though last year’s net neutrality rules already ban it as a discriminatory pricing model.

The problem is the FCC decided to deal with zero rating on a, "case by case basis," which so far has meant that the FCC hasn’t done a thing. [1]

Companies are using the FCC’s slow response to their advantage, hoping to spread enough propaganda about the programs that the FCC won't ban them. The reality is, though, the FCC will only act quickly if enough of us speak out and demand that they do the right thing.

Tell the FCC: protect net neutrality and stop Comcast, Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile from undermining the open Internet.

While each company’s Zero-Rating scheme is a little different, they all functionally work the same way. They all claim to offer consumers something for free, when in reality they use arbitrary data caps to gouge customers for more money while striking special deals that let them manipulate the way we all use the Internet.

Internet experts, academics, and free speech advocates agree that these types of practices are harmful to Internet users and undermine our rights. Wired put it pretty succinctly: Net Neutrality is in More Danger than Ever. [2]

The good news is that asking the FCC to stop this is not unprecedented. Not only is Zero-Rating already against the new rules, just last month, India’s telecom regulator banned Zero-Rating schemes based on the danger they pose to free speech and equal access to information.

But that victory in India only came after millions of people spoke out. We need to do the same thing here, and fast.

Tell the FCC: protect the open Internet and ban Zero-Rating. Don’t let Comcast, Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile undermine net neutrality.

Thanks for all you do,

Charlie

1. http://www.theverge.com/2016/1/19/10789522/verizon-freebee-sponsored-data-net-neutrality

2. http://www.wired.com/2016/03/despite-fcc-net-neutrality-danger-ever/


https://www.battleforthenet.com/#zero-rating?can_id=&source=email-comcast-and-verizon-are-violating-net-neutrality-8&email_referrer=comcast-and-verizon-are-violating-net-neutrality-8&email_subject=comcast-and-verizon-are-violating-net-neutrality&link_id=1
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22 / M / Germany
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Posted 3/14/16
TL;DR- Version anyone?
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Posted 3/14/16

ComboChrist wrote:

TL;DR- Version anyone?


What are you going to do if you CR sub get's increased, because you didn't want to take a minute to do something about it? What if not only you had a CR sub, but what if you have a Funi sub, a hulu sub, a Netflix sub, etc. All of their rates will go up, and if you've got subs for any of those, will you be able to keep paying the increased costs?

That's just part of the problem. The real problem is that Americans worked hard and got the FCC to make rules to protect net neutrality, and the big telecoms are ignoring those government regulations, and are doing violating net neutrality anyway. Meanwhile the FCC is dragging their feet about it instead of dragging the telecoms to the carpet to explain themselves.
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Posted 3/14/16

DeadlyOats wrote:


ComboChrist wrote:

TL;DR- Version anyone?


What are you going to do if you CR sub get's increased, because you didn't want to take a minute to do something about it? What if not only you had a CR sub, but what if you have a Funi sub, a hulu sub, a Netflix sub, etc. All of their rates will go up, and if you've got subs for any of those, will you be able to keep paying the increased costs?

That's just part of the problem. The real problem is that Americans worked hard and got the FCC to make rules to protect net neutrality, and the big telecoms are ignoring those government regulations, and are doing violating net neutrality anyway. Meanwhile the FCC is dragging their feet about it instead of dragging the telecoms to the carpet to explain themselves.


Yes. In fact I wouldn't even mind if I had to pay 20€ every month. Still a good price. That aside; Funi or Hulu aren't options for me.
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Posted 3/14/16

DeadlyOats wrote:

Here we go again.


Truer words were never spoken by the One-Post Pony.
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Posted 3/14/16
No one else have anything to say about this? If those telecoms are permitted to get away with this kind of behavior, they'll go to the next step and really start throttling the Internet, then charge us even more for faster speeds.
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26 / M / Houma
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Posted 3/14/16
I'm going to contact my senators once again. I'm expecting the bullshit non-answer pedophilia referencing deflection yet again. Yay politics
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40 / M / USA
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Posted 3/15/16
I've lost track of how many times both corporations and lawmakers have tried to do this. Eventually it's bound to get through. They've already done it like... maybe half a dozen times or more? I've stopped counting.
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29 / M / Rin Matsuoka
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Posted 3/15/16
good thing i do not live in the u.s.a
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26 / M / Houma
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Posted 3/19/16
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20160204/05121433515/states-wake-up-realize-att-lobbyists-have-been-writing-awful-protectionist-state-broadband-laws.shtml

While not completely on the topic at hand I feel this is relevant enough to be posted.


AT&T's response to Tennessee's sudden realization that the company has actively worked to ensure the state remains a broadband backwater? Give a lecture on how taxpayer money is fine to throw at AT&T, but is wasteful to use on delivering broadband to areas AT&T refuses to serve or upgrade:

AT&T spokesman Daniel Hayes said in an email "it is incorrect to equate the common practice of government providing incentives to encourage private-sector behavior with the concept of direct government competition."..."Generating significant amounts of public debt to sustain municipal networks is a different animal," Hayes added. "Taxpayer money should not be used to over-build or compete with the private sector, which has a proven history of funding, building, operating and upgrading broadband networks. Policies that discourage private-sector investment put at risk the world-class broadband infrastructure American consumers deserve and enjoy today."

The problem with that argument: that "proven history" isn't real. Companies like AT&T and Verizon have taken billions in subsidies over the years from federal and local governments, then failed repeatedly to meet deployment obligations. Companies like AT&T are now focusing all their attention on wireless and, outside of high-end development communities, have frozen deployment of fixed-line broadband. In fact, these companies are looking to disconnect millions of DSL customers they don't want to upgrade, potentially resulting in greater broadband gaps than ever before. Yet here the company is, still lecturing locals desperately looking for better connectivity on how only AT&T has the solution for what ails them.


lmfao world-class? What a joke.
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