Post Reply Can growing too attached to a character ruin the story?
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 3/21/16
Let me know if a thread like this one exist or not.
Thanks a bunches.


Let's say your writing a story and have an idea for an amazing character. Nothing wrong with that. But let's say you give this character great development and more. Soon you come very fond of this character that the other characters don't get the same treatment as that one character. Very soon you become really fond of that character that the other characters are left out. This character becomes your everything and you've become way too attached to it. Thus the story become solely for that character and all the other characters aren't even really there. Does that ruin the story? Should writers let themselves get too involved with a character and completely ignore the others? What do you call a character like this? How can I make a good character and not get too attached to it?


Enjoy!!!
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Posted 3/21/16 , edited 3/21/16
In my younger years I used to write stories and draw comics. I always got attached to the main character and the whole story solely revolved around them. I tried to involve multiple characters stories around the main character but I often got passionate about my creation and focused too much on my main character.

Even in space odysseys my main characters ship always avoided to blow up, and would recklessly dash into the front lines in the midst of battle. The main character always won every battle. It was a bit outrageous.

I would recommend trying your best to have a lively story for all the characters who will be in the story. It doesn't have to be everyone , but bring out the emotions, personas, characteristics and lives of each of the important characters involved around the main characters.

I made the mistake of making my other characters dull, and one of my friends who read my old stuff told me that it appeared that most of the characters didn't have any souls and or emotions. If you intend for others to read your work, you have to keep the reader engaged.

Let me use Hunter X Hunter for example. It was well written, and I had a deep understanding of the main characters as well as all the supporting characters. When the anime ended, I was lusting for more. I didn't want it to end. The progression of each character had me actively engaged wondering where they would end up.
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 3/21/16

VividDreamZ wrote:

In my younger years I used to write stories and draw comics. I always got attached to the main character and the whole story solely revolved around them. I tried to involve multiple characters stories around the main character but I often got passionate about my creation and focused too much on my main character.

Even in space odysseys my main characters ship always avoided to blow up, and would recklessly dash into the front lines in the midst of battle. The main character always won every battle. It was a bit outrageous.

I would recommend trying your best to have a lively story for all the characters who will be in the story. It doesn't have to be everyone , but bring out the emotions, personas, characteristics and lives of each of the important characters involved around the main characters.

I made the mistake of making my other characters dull, and one of my friends who read my old stuff told me that it appeared that most of the charters didn't have any souls and or emotions. If you intend for others to read your work, you have to keep the reader engaged.

Let me use Hunter X Hunter for example. It was well written, and I had a deep understanding of the main characters as well as all the supporting characters. When the anime ended, I was lusting for more. I didn't want it to end. The progression of each character had me actively engaged wondering where they would end up.



Thanks so much.
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Posted 3/23/16
Not if you enjoy doing it. If you're writing for others then it probably will deteriorate the story objectively.
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 3/23/16

GrandMasterTime wrote:

Not if you enjoy doing it. If you're writing for others then it probably will deteriorate the story objectively.


Okay then.
Posted 3/23/16

qualeshia3 wrote:

Let me know if a thread like this one exist or not.
Thanks a bunches.


Let's say your writing a story and have an idea for an amazing character. Nothing wrong with that. But let's say you give this character great development and more. Soon you come very fond of this character that the other characters don't get the same treatment as that one character. Very soon you become really fond of that character that the other characters are left out. This character becomes your everything and you've become way too attached to it. Thus the story become solely for that character and all the other characters aren't even really there. Does that ruin the story? Should writers let themselves get too involved with a character and completely ignore the others? What do you call a character like this? How can I make a good character and not get too attached to it?


Enjoy!!!


I hope you liked my character on your other forum ^__^ Hehehe.
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Posted 3/23/16
Yes, it ruins the story. Writers really shouldn't ignore any character, no. Most people call them 'Mary Sue', for some reason, probably to do with some sort of fan written fictional story on the internet involving Star Trek. I guess try to write about someone else when you notice that you've given over your life to a demanding daring-doer?
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48 / M / New England, USA
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Posted 3/23/16
It's a writers job to create something his fans can grow attached to. It's not the writers job to tell fans WHAT part of their creation they should grow attached to. For some, the story will drag them in. For others, it could be a character or characters themselves or their backstories. Sometimes, it's the setting or World itself that makes me stick with a franchise.

Some examples (for me):

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson make his stories a must to read. If he used generic detectives we wouldn't get the same feel out of his stories. Agatha Christie followed this way of thinking too.

Terry Pratchett (Discworld) and Robert Lynn Asprin (Thieves' World) created their worlds full of colorful characters but more-so made their worlds themselves into characters with personalities. For some, they'd find one character to connect with in each, but for myself and my friends we all agreed the best part of both series was the worlds themselves (like what Universal has done with the World of Harry Potter at their theme parks, there's just something "magical" (no pun intended) about them.

With Stephen King or Edgar Allen Poe, it's the stories themselves I gravitate to (even when I don't find a character to connect to, specifically). It's all about the story in these cases.

All you can do is write a strong story, with strong characters, in a strong setting and give people enough to choose from.

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Posted 3/23/16
I suppose in a way it can. I'm so emotionally attached to Ciel Phantomhive from Kuroshitsuji that I really do worry where the lates story arc is going. But being that attached to the characters also makes the joy and excitement of reading/watching it so much better. As long as my darling Ciel is okay
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Hoosierville
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Posted 3/23/16
Not if done right. See gurren lagann.

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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 3/23/16

neugenx wrote:

It's a writers job to create something his fans can grow attached to. It's not the writers job to tell fans WHAT part of their creation they should grow attached to. For some, the story will drag them in. For others, it could be a character or characters themselves or their backstories. Sometimes, it's the setting or World itself that makes me stick with a franchise.

Some examples (for me):

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson make his stories a must to read. If he used generic detectives we wouldn't get the same feel out of his stories. Agatha Christie followed this way of thinking too.

Terry Pratchett (Discworld) and Robert Lynn Asprin (Thieves' World) created their worlds full of colorful characters but more-so made their worlds themselves into characters with personalities. For some, they'd find one character to connect with in each, but for myself and my friends we all agreed the best part of both series was the worlds themselves (like what Universal has done with the World of Harry Potter at their theme parks, there's just something "magical" (no pun intended) about them.

With Stephen King or Edgar Allen Poe, it's the stories themselves I gravitate to (even when I don't find a character to connect to, specifically). It's all about the story in these cases.

All you can do is write a strong story, with strong characters, in a strong setting and give people enough to choose from.



Thank you very much.
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48 / M / New England, USA
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Posted 3/23/16

qualeshia3 wrote:



Thank you very much.


Yvw .
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