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Post Reply Fellow CR's, Who's a Programmer & What do you usually do?
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Rabbit Horse
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Posted 4/28/16 , edited 4/28/16

bronzefoot wrote:
Thanks for that. to be a pain is it possible to break it down even further. Is there a service that would take on the job?


it doesn't seem to have an option to show it in binary. only hex, decimal and octal


though if you really wanted, you could copy the hex data and use some other program that converts octal / hex to binary.
might take a while though, for obvious reasons. this particular program has some other features, like checksum, split, concatenate, statistics, find / replace, export to several programming languages, or as 16/20/32 hex file. and also some option regarding ram.
btw, not sure why you'd need binary when you can manipulate it using hex.
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53 / M
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Posted 4/28/16 , edited 4/28/16

namealreadytaken wrote:


bronzefoot wrote:
Thanks for that. to be a pain is it possible to break it down even further. Is there a service that would take on the job?


it doesn't seem to have an option to show it in binary. only hex, decimal and octal


though if you really wanted, you could copy the hex data and use some other program that converts octal / hex to binary.
might take a while though, for obvious reasons. this particular program has some other features, like checksum, split, concatenate, statistics, find / replace, export to several programming languages, or as 16/20/32 hex file. and also some option regarding ram.
btw, not sure why you'd need binary when you can manipulate it using hex.


It's not about manipulation, rather an 'arty' deconstruction of memory. e.g. a family photo (emotion) now displayed in binders now as pure information removed from context. It's how my brain works. Thanks again for your help, much appreciated.
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Posted 4/28/16 , edited 4/28/16
I design computer hardware.

The only times I deal with programming is when I have to modify codes used to verify circuit designs.

I design stuff all of you use
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19 / M / east coast. Let t...
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Posted 4/28/16 , edited 4/28/16
I'm not a programmer but you can sort of look like one. Just press f11 for full screen.
http://hackertyper.net/
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20 / M / Sweden
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Posted 4/28/16 , edited 4/28/16
I have worked in Java, HTML, python, C#, PHP and a few other lang. But aren't really doing that any more, however I am trying to learn 3D and smart 3D design for game development right now
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38 / M
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Posted 4/28/16 , edited 4/28/16
I currently work as a Senior Programmer/Analyst. I don't typically use standard programming languages, though. I wouldn't claim to know them, actually. I've worked some with HTML/Java, and more with SQL. I used to code in VBA at another job years ago. I currently work with querying software suite called Powerhouse Tools and make processes out of that. I also utilize awk/sed in some processes and some proprietary scripting that is in a process scheduling application.
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30 / M / WA, USA
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Posted 5/1/16

bronzefoot wrote:


namealreadytaken wrote:



though if you really wanted, you could copy the hex data and use some other program that converts octal / hex to binary.
might take a while though, for obvious reasons. this particular program has some other features, like checksum, split, concatenate, statistics, find / replace, export to several programming languages, or as 16/20/32 hex file. and also some option regarding ram.
btw, not sure why you'd need binary when you can manipulate it using hex.


It's not about manipulation, rather an 'arty' deconstruction of memory. e.g. a family photo (emotion) now displayed in binders now as pure information removed from context. It's how my brain works. Thanks again for your help, much appreciated.


So I found this to be an interesting idea, so I took it a little further. Instead of just dumping the binary output of that PNG file, I setup a process to decode the image to raw RGBA (red, green, blue, alpha) samples, and then display the value of each pixel in binary, one pixel per line.

Note that the output this way is VERY large. PNG, GIF, and JPEG files are all compressed.* Raw data tends to be pretty large, and even bigger if you represent it as binary text.

I put some links in the spoiler below, to prevent people from accidentally loading such large files.



If you know someone who's handy with the linux or mac command line and has ImageMagick installed, you can generate it yourself with the following command line:

convert FILE-NAME-HERE RGBA:- | xxd -b -c 4 | cut -d ' ' -f2,3,4,5 > TEXT-FILE-OUTPUT-HERE.txt

Explanation: ImageMagick converts the image to a stream of RGBA samples, xxd converts it to binary and outputs 4 columns, then cut is used to remove the position and ASCII representation columns, so you're just left with the binary RGBA data on each line.

Now that I'm in full-nerd mode after taking an hour to make that: You know what might be interesting? Setting up a process to convert images to sound. Maybe later though. Just sticking a WAV header in front of the RGBA data would work, but I have a feeling it would mostly sound like static. It would probably take some processing to make the picture sound interesting.

* Interesting aside to note there: the actual image scanlines in PNG files are stored with deflate encoding inside of the IDAT chunk(s), so you can actually spot where the image data starts in that HxD screenshot on the previous page by looking for IDAT on the right.
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16 / M
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Posted 5/1/16 , edited 5/1/16
I'm a really shitty C++ programmer, though none of my projects have ever been in any way commercial. I tend to just come up with an idea and try to implement it, or make things out of necessity. I tend to only program in C++, but I do know Ruby pretty well and a little ASM.
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Posted 5/1/16

evilpuffball wrote:


bronzefoot wrote:


namealreadytaken wrote:



though if you really wanted, you could copy the hex data and use some other program that converts octal / hex to binary.
might take a while though, for obvious reasons. this particular program has some other features, like checksum, split, concatenate, statistics, find / replace, export to several programming languages, or as 16/20/32 hex file. and also some option regarding ram.
btw, not sure why you'd need binary when you can manipulate it using hex.


It's not about manipulation, rather an 'arty' deconstruction of memory. e.g. a family photo (emotion) now displayed in binders now as pure information removed from context. It's how my brain works. Thanks again for your help, much appreciated.


So I found this to be an interesting idea, so I took it a little further. Instead of just dumping the binary output of that PNG file, I setup a process to decode the image to raw RGBA (red, green, blue, alpha) samples, and then display the value of each pixel in binary, one pixel per line.

Note that the output this way is VERY large. PNG, GIF, and JPEG files are all compressed.* Raw data tends to be pretty large, and even bigger if you represent it as binary text.

I put some links in the spoiler below, to prevent people from accidentally loading such large files.



If you know someone who's handy with the linux or mac command line and has ImageMagick installed, you can generate it yourself with the following command line:

convert FILE-NAME-HERE RGBA:- | xxd -b -c 4 | cut -d ' ' -f2,3,4,5 > TEXT-FILE-OUTPUT-HERE.txt

Explanation: ImageMagick converts the image to a stream of RGBA samples, xxd converts it to binary and outputs 4 columns, then cut is used to remove the position and ASCII representation columns, so you're just left with the binary RGBA data on each line.

Now that I'm in full-nerd mode after taking an hour to make that: You know what might be interesting? Setting up a process to convert images to sound. Maybe later though. Just sticking a WAV header in front of the RGBA data would work, but I have a feeling it would mostly sound like static. It would probably take some processing to make the picture sound interesting.

* Interesting aside to note there: the actual image scanlines in PNG files are stored with deflate encoding inside of the IDAT chunk(s), so you can actually spot where the image data starts in that HxD screenshot on the previous page by looking for IDAT on the right.

Looking at this, you're taking an uncompressed bitmap, then representing 4 8 bit channels as 8 bit ascii. Insanity.
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F / Colorado
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Posted 5/1/16
Currently in the web development arena both front and back-end. Do have language skills in C, C++, assembly, ect.
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53 / M
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Posted 5/2/16

evilpuffball wrote:


bronzefoot wrote:


namealreadytaken wrote:



though if you really wanted, you could copy the hex data and use some other program that converts octal / hex to binary.
might take a while though, for obvious reasons. this particular program has some other features, like checksum, split, concatenate, statistics, find / replace, export to several programming languages, or as 16/20/32 hex file. and also some option regarding ram.
btw, not sure why you'd need binary when you can manipulate it using hex.


It's not about manipulation, rather an 'arty' deconstruction of memory. e.g. a family photo (emotion) now displayed in binders now as pure information removed from context. It's how my brain works. Thanks again for your help, much appreciated.


So I found this to be an interesting idea, so I took it a little further. Instead of just dumping the binary output of that PNG file, I setup a process to decode the image to raw RGBA (red, green, blue, alpha) samples, and then display the value of each pixel in binary, one pixel per line.

Note that the output this way is VERY large. PNG, GIF, and JPEG files are all compressed.* Raw data tends to be pretty large, and even bigger if you represent it as binary text.

I put some links in the spoiler below, to prevent people from accidentally loading such large files.



If you know someone who's handy with the linux or mac command line and has ImageMagick installed, you can generate it yourself with the following command line:

convert FILE-NAME-HERE RGBA:- | xxd -b -c 4 | cut -d ' ' -f2,3,4,5 > TEXT-FILE-OUTPUT-HERE.txt

Explanation: ImageMagick converts the image to a stream of RGBA samples, xxd converts it to binary and outputs 4 columns, then cut is used to remove the position and ASCII representation columns, so you're just left with the binary RGBA data on each line.

Now that I'm in full-nerd mode after taking an hour to make that: You know what might be interesting? Setting up a process to convert images to sound. Maybe later though. Just sticking a WAV header in front of the RGBA data would work, but I have a feeling it would mostly sound like static. It would probably take some processing to make the picture sound interesting.

* Interesting aside to note there: the actual image scanlines in PNG files are stored with deflate encoding inside of the IDAT chunk(s), so you can actually spot where the image data starts in that HxD screenshot on the previous page by looking for IDAT on the right.


You are a legend
Art and science together is something I seem to come back to a lot.
When I get around to this project I'll give you a special mention in the blurb.
Again thanks.
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21 / F / USA
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Posted 5/3/16
I have taken a few programming classes since middle school covering Visual Basic, C++, and html. Been playing around with Python on my own. I am looking at engineering, possibly computer hardware or software so that would be useful there. Usually though I just use it to play around with modding some games I play. I had an idea for an android app so I have been looking at realizing that this summer.
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