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Post Reply If the Sun went dark would all life on Earth eventually end?
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27 / M
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Posted 4/10/16 , edited 4/10/16
Temperatures would rapidly plummet, all sorts of animals and plants would die out, and that would cause a chain reaction, killing whatever creatures that depend on those for survival. The world of living creatures would collapse.

We probably would not be able to react quickly enough to survive the sudden temperature drop.

Some creatures might be able to hold out for a little while, but the drop in temperature would eventually freeze everything. It would probably take less than a week for the oceans to become so cold that everything dies.
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18 / M / Crimson Mage Village
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Posted 4/10/16
This is all based on the assumption that life one Earth would still even exist.

And, mind you, there's no way to predict what could happen that far into the unknown, so there isn't really much point into worrying. After all, if there's one thing humans excel at, it's procrastination -- we'll get it done somehow if we still exist.



-one thing's for sure though: if the sun went dark, the solar system's energy bill wouldn't have as many holes in it...
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Posted 4/10/16
All plant life would die due to lack of photosynthesis and decreasing temperatures, leading to the death of all animals dependent on plants for sustenance. Even if humans could withstand dropping temperatures, there would be no further oxygen production. What remained of life would deplete oxygen supplies rapidly. Dropping temperatures would eventually cause the top layers of our oceans to freeze over as well. It would be unrealistic to believe that even the most intelligent of humankind could survive very long at all. This is not even taking into account the the sun keeps our planet in orbit. It is a truly terrifying thought!
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Posted 4/11/16 , edited 4/11/16
I liked the point about the sun going dark would cause it to collapse and then throw the entire plant out of its orbit. It might collide with another planet eventually but without the sun the Earth's orbit is no longer relevant anyway. So in the meantime humans are scrambling for survival. Whether by some extraordinary feat of technological development humans manage some sort of functional shelter for a handful of people, yes their eventual demise is very likely imminent. But I do think some organisms will continue to survive.

Even though Earth's atmosphere would collapse after being frozen and nothing to replenish it, perhaps due the increased cosmic radiation filtering in through the ice to produce a sort of a greenhouse effect in the ocean, I think a significant portion of the Earth's water will remain unfrozen. Add to that the energy from inside the planet, it will probably remain liquid for at least several million years. As long as there's liquid water there will probably be life somewhere.

I made this thread with the idea that we are able to build habitable space stations. So if the Earth effectively became a giant space station but everything we need (except the sun) is already right here, could use that to keep it habitable? I have pretty strong doubts, just because of the absolute chaos that would result from this scenario. Would prevent anything productive enough from getting done.

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Posted 4/11/16
Most likely.
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Posted 4/11/16

bronzefoot wrote:

Ah, you young kids and your 'oh no, the sun has gone out and we'll all freeze".
When I was your age the sun would only come on maybe 1 day out of 7 if you were lucky. I spent the other days walking through the snow to the hydrogen forests to get enough fuel for the rest of the week.


Through snow? Luxury! We had to trudge through rivers of liquid nitrogen, uphill, both ways!
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Posted 4/11/16

JustineKo2 wrote:
Even though Earth's atmosphere would collapse after being frozen and nothing to replenish it, perhaps due the increased cosmic radiation filtering in through the ice to produce a sort of a greenhouse effect in the ocean, I think a significant portion of the Earth's water will remain unfrozen. Add to that the energy from inside the planet, it will probably remain liquid for at least several million years. As long as there's liquid water there will probably be life somewhere.


Water bears. Water bears would survive. Those bastards can survive anything.

The initial freezing over of the oceans would insulate the remaining water for quite some time. Several hundred thousand years even. But they would eventually freeze. Still, some microorganisms would undoubtedly survive. Rest of us would be screwed. So life itself would not be completely snuffed out. However, it would never evolve to any complex forms again under the conditions Earth would be left in.



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Posted 4/11/16

RebRebel wrote:


bronzefoot wrote:

Ah, you young kids and your 'oh no, the sun has gone out and we'll all freeze".
When I was your age the sun would only come on maybe 1 day out of 7 if you were lucky. I spent the other days walking through the snow to the hydrogen forests to get enough fuel for the rest of the week.


Through snow? Luxury! We had to trudge through rivers of liquid nitrogen, uphill, both ways!



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Posted 4/11/16

runec wrote:


JustineKo2 wrote:
Even though Earth's atmosphere would collapse after being frozen and nothing to replenish it, perhaps due the increased cosmic radiation filtering in through the ice to produce a sort of a greenhouse effect in the ocean, I think a significant portion of the Earth's water will remain unfrozen. Add to that the energy from inside the planet, it will probably remain liquid for at least several million years. As long as there's liquid water there will probably be life somewhere.


Water bears. Water bears would survive. Those bastards can survive anything.

The initial freezing over of the oceans would insulate the remaining water for quite some time. Several hundred thousand years even. But they would eventually freeze. Still, some microorganisms would undoubtedly survive. Rest of us would be screwed. So life itself would not be completely snuffed out. However, it would never evolve to any complex forms again under the conditions Earth would be left in.





Dude! ! I was so into them when I saw them on the news!

They froze one for like 30 years and it thawed just fine and started eating and laying eggs!

They even survived in outer space!!

Tbh, as long as earth doesn't get smashed to bits or scorched by an exploding sun, lots of organisms would lay dormant until an alien race thawed them out in an ideal environment
Sogno- 
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Posted 4/11/16
yes i personally would die like like 6 seconds

i cannot bear the cold
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Posted 4/11/16

namealreadytaken wrote:


lambofgenesis wrote:


namealreadytaken wrote:


lambofgenesis wrote:


DrNope wrote:

I don't believe all life would end if the Sun went out. A lot of life lives in deep oceans that never see the sun light. But live near thermal vents and feed off nutrients and minerals from those vents. Bacteria would more than likely survive long after humanity died out due to lack of Sun too.


Wait but the real question is would the thermal vents be hot enough to keep the water around it liquid? With the sun cold, you'd be talking about temperatures colder than pluto

remember that the layer of ice would insulate the ocean, so it wouldn't be as bad.


Without an actual heat source, all that heat will dissipate eventually. I mean you can keep warm soup in a thermos but it'll get cold eventually


the earth itself is the heat source.


This.

The radioactive decay occurring in the Earth's core and the density of the Earth's core are partly responsible for the shifting of plate tectonics, which create volcanoes and thermal vents(convection).
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Posted 4/11/16
Yes. There would be no more life on earth. Vulcanos aren't enough to keep the oceans warm. It's likely that the earth was "frozen" once even though the sun was shining and even with the sun it wasn't for sure that the ice would melt again. Without the sun the ice would be extremely thick. The pressure would be extraordinary high therefore it's likely that the water underneath the ice wouldn't be liquid anymore. And even if you could still find liquid water, with all the changes the water wouldn't be the same as today. I doubt that any life form would be able to evolve that fast.
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Posted 4/12/16
Would humans survive? Absolutely not. But I do think something out there will adapt and remain alive.
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Posted 4/12/16 , edited 4/12/16
Photo synthisis would be impossible so plants couldn't produce oxygen meaning we'd all suffocate... So no, we'd all die...becuase I have to spell it out for some of you.
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Posted 4/12/16

52infinity wrote:

Photo synthisis would be impossible so plants couldn't produce oxygen meaning we'd all suffocate... So no, we'd all die...becuase I have to spell it out for some of you.


So glad you can spell photosynthesis. /sarcasm.
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