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Post Reply What thing did we invent that made humans look more stupid?
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Posted 4/10/16

PWRofInk wrote:

Selfie sticks, a lot of modern kid's shows, necklaces, rings, and ear rings.


^ This.
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19 / M / east coast. Let t...
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Posted 4/10/16
The ostrich pillow. It's a good idea. It just looks stupid.
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Posted 4/10/16 , edited 4/10/16
Fashion.


-humans have never looked more stupid without it...
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Posted 4/10/16 , edited 4/10/16

ZavinRoyalheart wrote:

The ostrich pillow. It's a good idea. It just looks stupid.


It's also zoologically insulting, which makes it stupid:
Ostriches don't stick their heads in the sand ("and whistle through the whole of the afternoon" - Benny Hill), like most long necked birds, they threaten enemies by snaking their heads close to the ground.
Just that ostriches have farther to go to reach the ground than geese or turkeys do.


qualeshia3 wrote:

What is the smartest thing we invented?


The iPad. Next question.
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Posted 4/10/16
selfie sticks
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Posted 4/10/16
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Posted 4/10/16
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Posted 4/10/16

scye27 wrote:

Confirmation bias and mob mentality were for sure around for millennia, but the speed with which it happens appears to have increased dramatically. It could be more the information age in general that has sped this up, but in the last decade, and even the last 5 years, it's everywhere, and with much greater frequency. Also, I feel people can still have thought provoking conversations, but it seems that there is always the distraction of the smartphone notification that pulls people away from this conversation.


This is a really strange topic to research, as well as discuss. I can't find any conclusive evidence to either substantiate or refute your claim. Meanwhile, I find myself reading articles such as this one, and I can't help but think the article is referring to itself.

http://www.theguardian.com/media-network/media-network-blog/2014/may/13/internet-confirmation-bias


However, rather than enhancing knowledge, the internet has produced an information glut or "infoxication". Indeed, online stories are to intellectual curiosity what fast food is to hunger. Most of the stories we consume online are as valuable as daytime television. Furthermore, since online content is often curated to fit our preferences, interests and personality, the internet can even enhance our existing biases and undermine our motivation to learn new things.


And then I find myself questioning whether I have fallen victim to confirmation bias myself by taking the information that corroborates my beliefs and then dismissing articles such as this one. Still, I'm not sure how one would go about measuring the frequency of confirmation bias and mob mentality over time. With no data to go on, all one can do is speculate and pick a side, but that in itself feels just like mob mentality. This whole topic seems very ironic and meta.

In conclusion, all I can really say is that I'm still unconvinced. If anything, I believe information technology has made it easier to propagate misinformation in a believable way, and that probably does a lot to facilitate people who engage in confirmation bias, but to say that it stifles their critical thinking skills is a bit of a stretch. I'd be more inclined to believe that such a person either didn't have critical thinking skills in the first place or are otherwise unwilling to engage in critical thinking on a particular subject, and making information less accessible would make no real difference. However, I will make no attempt to mask the fact that my belief in this case is based entirely on my own personal bias. Take it or leave it.
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Posted 4/10/16 , edited 4/12/16
Every "As Seen On TV" item ever
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21 / M / U.S.A.
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Posted 4/10/16
Hah. The internet.
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Posted 4/10/16
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Posted 4/10/16

SparkleDeath wrote:

Every "As Seen On TV" item ever


No, just the Informercial itself, which soon made all form of local station programming and syndicated movie and reruns extinct.
And having thus devoured local stations, went after cable.
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Posted 4/10/16

staphen wrote:


scye27 wrote:

Confirmation bias and mob mentality were for sure around for millennia, but the speed with which it happens appears to have increased dramatically. It could be more the information age in general that has sped this up, but in the last decade, and even the last 5 years, it's everywhere, and with much greater frequency. Also, I feel people can still have thought provoking conversations, but it seems that there is always the distraction of the smartphone notification that pulls people away from this conversation.


This is a really strange topic to research, as well as discuss. I can't find any conclusive evidence to either substantiate or refute your claim. Meanwhile, I find myself reading articles such as this one, and I can't help but think the article is referring to itself.

http://www.theguardian.com/media-network/media-network-blog/2014/may/13/internet-confirmation-bias


However, rather than enhancing knowledge, the internet has produced an information glut or "infoxication". Indeed, online stories are to intellectual curiosity what fast food is to hunger. Most of the stories we consume online are as valuable as daytime television. Furthermore, since online content is often curated to fit our preferences, interests and personality, the internet can even enhance our existing biases and undermine our motivation to learn new things.


And then I find myself questioning whether I have fallen victim to confirmation bias myself by taking the information that corroborates my beliefs and then dismissing articles such as this one. Still, I'm not sure how one would go about measuring the frequency of confirmation bias and mob mentality over time. With no data to go on, all one can do is speculate and pick a side, but that in itself feels just like mob mentality. This whole topic seems very ironic and meta.

In conclusion, all I can really say is that I'm still unconvinced. If anything, I believe information technology has made it easier to propagate misinformation in a believable way, and that probably does a lot to facilitate people who engage in confirmation bias, but to say that it stifles their critical thinking skills is a bit of a stretch. I'd be more inclined to believe that such a person either didn't have critical thinking skills in the first place or are otherwise unwilling to engage in critical thinking on a particular subject, and making information less accessible would make no real difference. However, I will make no attempt to mask the fact that my belief in this case is based entirely on my own personal bias. Take it or leave it.


I think the internet increases your knowledge / intelligence overall. I learned stuff they didn't teach in school (the universe being "round"). I'm constantly updated on new health research. I learned about Trans today thanks to forum arguments. I learned more about many scientific and psychological stuff.

I guess even if you mindlessly use the net for porn, anime, gaming, tabloid news sites, kkk or other discrimination sites, and social media you'll still be exposed to new things you weren't aware of before via posts or ads or comments
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Posted 4/10/16

GayAsianBoy wrote:

virgin sacrifices


Well I guess someones not invited to my Bar Mitzvah. lel
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