Post Reply Is it me or were Older games more commonly Sand Box games?
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Posted 4/26/16
If I think about it, and I'm kinda pooped at the moment but when I think about like Super Nintendo games, most of the Nintendo games were Sandbox like like Super Mario World or Super Metroid or like N64 Super Mario 64 or the Gamecube Sunshine or Luigi's Mansion or sh*t, like Super Mario Bros 3 NES.
Metroid games, Donkey Kong country, Banjo Kazooie games, Legends of Zelda games.

Am I naming off just the Sand box like games or is there something to this? o.o
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Posted 4/26/16
what is a sand box game imma confused? can you explain
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Posted 4/26/16 , edited 4/28/16
Super Mario World is a sandbox game? Wha?? Sure it has "World" in the title, but it's not really an open-world game, it has a rather clear-cut level progression system. Same with Donkey Kong country as I recall.


Metroid's debatable, I guess, since most of the map is completely inaccessible until you beat the bosses in a rather specific order.

When I think of early sandbox games I typically think of things like Elder Scrolls, Grand Theft Auto or Ultima.
Posted 4/26/16 , edited 4/28/16

sah36ila wrote:

what is a sand box game imma confused? can you explain




A sandbox is a style of game in which minimal character limitations are placed on the gamer, allowing the gamer to roam and change a virtual world at will. In contrast to a progression-style game, a sandbox game emphasizes roaming and allows a gamer to select tasks. Instead of featuring segmented areas or numbered levels, a sandbox game usually occurs in a “world” to which the gamer has full access from start to finish.

A sandbox game is also known as an open-world or free-roaming game.
--Technopedia

Also known as open world these days.

Super Mario World is very linear, you have pretty limited choice where to go, and progression is
enforced with timers for individual levels which you must clear open other areas of the map. Super Mario Bros. 3 has similar systems.

Mario 64 etc while slightly more open are still pretty rigorous in their progression mechanics. For example, in Mario 64 you can choose from several levels but once you choose a level you must declare the task you are going to complete and the game holds you to it. You either get the star, fail, or exit.
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Posted 4/26/16 , edited 4/28/16
in Super Mario World, users have the option to take the shortcut, so there's some degree of freedom, though not by much.

edit:
as for Mario 64, while you need to gather stars to unlock the next levels, each subworld can give up to 10 different stars, and you only need a small amount of them to unlock the next levels. for example, getting 3 stars in Bob-omb Battlefield is enough to unlock the subworlds
Whomp's Fortress, Jolly Roger Bay and Cool, Cool Mountain. the amount of stars needed was likely kept low to allow players some freedom in how they acquire the stars.
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