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Why do you think people today have become so sensitive?
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104 / M
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Posted 5/9/16 , edited 5/9/16
most people are cowards now, and we talk way to much, and with people who do not respect our views or have a open mind. and why are we having conversations with women that are clearly biased and prejudice towards men?
Sogno- 
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Posted 5/9/16
everyone is a special snowflake
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Posted 5/9/16
http://www.algemeiner.com/2015/01/22/the-decline-and-fall-of-modern-civilization-8-simple-steps-to-squandering-it-all/
This explains it quite well, I believe.
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Posted 5/9/16
isnt it just on the internet? we think about ourselves more than twice as often on the internet as opposed to face-to-face

ppl prob just became spoiled cuz its so easy n quick to do things that pleases us on the internet
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37 / M / SW Ontario, Canada
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Posted 5/9/16
Because too many people got too high on being able to say whatever they wanted without ever having to think twice about how it might impact others because "it's just the internet, man" or "get a thicker skin, dude" or "it doesn't bother me so it shouldn't bother anyone." This led to the inevitable push back from the opposite perspective and now the pendulum has swung perhaps too far back in the other direction.
runec 
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Posted 5/9/16

Yume_Mirai wrote:
Its obvious. But I'd like to hear in your own words How did it happen and What can be done about it. Thank you.^^


Are people today really more sensitive or have offensive things become less acceptable leading to more complaints that people are more sensitive today? Or has the internet just given everyone the optimum vehicle to gang up and yell at each other about who is being sensitive and who is being offensive? -.-

American culture has been asking the question "Why is x so sensitive?" for decades. I hesitate to say people are more sensitive or more offensive. We just have lightning fast access to more examples of both sides than we've ever had before combined with the ability to immediately start yelling at other people about it as soon as we see said examples.

I can't track down any real research on the subject either way so I'm leaning towards this being a problem of perception stemming from the unprecedented increases in access to information we've had over the past 15-20 years.


Kelif 
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24 / M / Everywhere and no...
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Posted 5/9/16 , edited 5/9/16
I am sure there are many factors that play into the reality or the perception of a more sensitive society. I am reading many great theories and ideas. It may not be too far fetched to believe that people in sans-internet societies can't really afford to shelter themselves from personal jabs as much as an average person from a well-off country such as the US.
At the same time, you can say that the romantic themes seen today have been around in history, well since the romantic era: Hamlet is a prime example of a 16th century emo. He was also not the least bit concerned about his finances as much as his love life.
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21 / M / U.S.A.
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Posted 5/9/16 , edited 5/9/16

RedExodus wrote:

isnt it just on the internet? we think about ourselves more than twice as often on the internet as opposed to face-to-face

No.


ppl prob just became spoiled cuz its so easy n quick to do things that pleases us on the internet

Of course the things we have nowadays that are taken for granted are a large cause of it.
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Posted 5/9/16 , edited 5/9/16
http://www.npr.org/2011/03/02/134196209/study-most-plastics-leach-hormone-like-chemicals



Most plastic products, from sippy cups to food wraps, can release chemicals that act like the sex hormone estrogen, according to a study in Environmental Health Perspectives.

The study found these chemicals even in products that didn't contain BPA, a compound in certain plastics that's been widely criticized because it mimics estrogen.

Many plastic products are now marketed as BPA-free, and manufacturers have begun substituting other chemicals whose effects aren't as well known.

But it's still unclear whether people are being harmed by BPA or any other so-called estrogenic chemicals in plastics. Most studies of health effects have been done in mice and rats.

The new study doesn't look at health risks. It simply asks whether common plastic products release estrogen-like chemicals other than BPA.

The researchers bought more than 450 plastic items from stores including Walmart and Whole Foods. They chose products designed to come in contact with food — things like baby bottles, deli packaging and flexible bags, says George Bittner, one of the study's authors and a professor of biology at the University of Texas, Austin.

Then CertiChem, a testing company founded by Bittner, chopped up pieces of each product and soaked them in either saltwater or alcohol to see what came out.

The testing showed that more than 70 percent of the products released chemicals that acted like estrogen. And that was before they exposed the stuff to real-world conditions: simulated sunlight, dishwashing and microwaving, Bittner says.
To Fear Or Not To Fear Plastics?

Exactly how BPA affects humans, and how serious its effects are, are still very much up for debate. The U.S. government generally advocates caution and more research, but agencies have issued a range of hesitant warnings. The National Toxicology Program, a division of the National Institutes of Health, says it has "some concern" about potential BPA exposures to the brains and prostate glands of fetuses, infants and children. Other agencies say they have lingering, unresolved "questions" about the chemical.

Those questions largely circle around how prolonged exposure to the chemical in childhood or adulthood could affect reproduction and growth; how low-dose exposure at sensitive developmental stages could affect children and babies later in life; and how parental exposure could affect the next generation. Studies have shown links between BPA and cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and a host of other illnesses.

One major sticking point for scientists is the challenge of drawing conclusions from hundreds of studies, each using different animals (mice and rats among them), doses, and routes of exposure. As the Environmental Protection Agency has noted, "there is controversy about whether effects seen at lower doses in animals are meaningful and relevant to humans." And scientists have also wondered whether rodents are more sensitive to the chemical than us because they metabolize it differently.

Last year, the NIH launched a new round of studies, all with the same methodology, designed to answer the some of the niggling questions and help the government provide clearer guidance than it's been able to so far.

— Eliza Barclay

"Then, you greatly increase the probability that you're going to get chemicals having estrogenic activity released," he says, adding that more than 95 percent of the products tested positive after undergoing this sort of stress.
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21 / M / Merica'
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Posted 5/9/16
A lack of Freedom. *Eagle sound*
Posted 5/9/16 , edited 5/9/16
I blame Obama.
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21 / M / U.S.A.
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Posted 5/9/16

Seacactus wrote:

I blame Obama.

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F
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Posted 5/9/16
the lot of kids are raised with spoons in their mouths and never told 'no', thus they grow up to become little brats who expect to be treated specially.
Posted 5/9/16 , edited 5/9/16
We don't work with people in real life like the old days. We are all online. We solve problems with the keyboard.
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8500 / F / Apollo...
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Posted 5/9/16 , edited 5/9/16
People haven't mentally been beaten to a pulp of nothingness. They're sensitive because they want to find something to be a victim of. Their level of suffering reflects their sensitivity. Thick skin hasn't grown or formed.

First world problems.
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