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Post Reply Learning Japanese
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Posted 9/2/16
Rosetta Stone Course has really helped me but it is really expensive
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Ajures
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Posted 9/2/16
You can, print off or write the names of everyday objects with Japanese names and post them to it
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25 / M / Sweden
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Posted 9/3/16
Ive been using flashcards to learn chinese for a couple of years and that works really well for me. Maybe you can find a similar tool if you are interested in learning the kanji too.
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25 / M / UK
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Posted 9/9/16
Im in the process of learning Japanese as well and I found Japanese music very helpful. It helped a lot with pronunciation and it was fun to do it that way as well.

Learning a language can be a pain sometimes so you need to do it in as fun a way as possible, such as with music.

When you start is the hardest time, but when you get past that barrier and get into the swing of it, you'll find it much easier.
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Posted 1/20/17 , edited 1/20/17
Use memrise.com

In my experience you want to use more English towards the beginning, learning grammar etc.

Eventually you want to move into cultural aspects too, because this is a big part of learning the language is understanding the culture because that'll tell you WHY PEOPLE DO THINGS.

Check out 4FriendsNihongo.com - that site really helps memorize things and also for learning things outside of memorization.

Learn Hiragana and Katakana thru memrise. Honestly if you learn lots of vocabulary you can kind of guess what Japanese people are saying in shows, especially if you have subtitles because then you can use the Traditional Chinese trackpad in order to look up any kanji you don't know on your phone - just download a dictionary app or something and input everything into there. After you get a little foundation going and a lot of vocab words memorized, you want to watch anime or drama (anything with subtitles) so that you can apply what you learned to realtime conversation. Try and watch shows that are more realistic when learning Japanese so you don't memorize unnecessary vocab and also you get to learn things that are actually said on a daily basis.
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Posted 1/21/17 , edited 1/21/17

InkyOtter wrote:

What do you guys thinks the best method to go by when learning a new language??
Memorising the symbols and how they're pronounced first or word association and building sentences before learning to write it out.. or any other method you've been taught!



Dedication


you can learn a new language in 6 months or 10+ years and still don't know how to read and write

for the anime/manga fanatics who want to learn Japanese just because they like anime/manga ..

you will not see most of them after 102


101-- they will use romanji.. but when you going to 102 and up it's all Japanese -- and this is where you will see people dropping out since they can't read the kanji, hiragana and katakana


learning a few words or phrases from your favorite anime series is nothing like learning the language

so the only thing you will need is dedication.. of which most anime/manga fans don't have

anyway.. good luck.
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Posted 1/22/17 , edited 1/22/17
how to get great articulation:
https://www.kandagaigo.ac.jp/kuis/about/bulletin/jp/026/pdf/012.pdf
to learn more about IPA and intonation/rhythm in L2, look up idahosa ness for a training guide and compare IPA differences between en/jp.look up tofugu/JP IPA vids too.
if you can work machines/spectrograms to test your pronunciation, thats guddo. your voice is different in recordins than what u hear after all

how to not quit the process:
account for your own human nature. if you focus on boring and efficient plans over what you find interesting/meaningful, you burn out like the rabbit vs the turtle. flashcards are not for everyone for example. the learning process(emphasis on learning, not studying) is extremely flexible.

content n stages n stuff:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGK2KZ1TNRY&t=2025s
ajatt and jalup google searches will tell u more

tools:
get plugins like rikaikun and texthooker for non-webpages. if you have an iphone with dictionaries like from japanesepod101(has voices) or jisho.org, that works too
CaelK 
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Posted 1/22/17 , edited 1/22/17

AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:

Dedication



Can't agree with this enough. I don't know about you, but when I was 10, I still wasn't talking very well in my native language. When you start learning Japanese, guess what? It's like going through that all over again. So it ain't strange if it takes years.

Personally, I value knowing grammar over knowing words. If all you need is a dictionary to translate, then you're doing pretty good - vocabulary is largely memorization, and anyone can memorize words. You did it when you learned your native language, after all.

The inverse however... knowing words without knowing how they relate to each other kinda sucks and leads to a lot of wrong translations. Honestly, knowing the bulk of Japanese grammar is easier than memorizing all of the words you need to be fluent. Once you know how the language ticks, you can easily get back a forgotten word with the interwebs.

That being said, once you have to start kicking it up, raw memorization will be involved. Nothing you can do but power through it. Strange as it might sound as well, talking to yourself in Japanese can also help. Even if you're not conversing with anyone, it gets your muscles used to saying certain things, and your brain thinking about how to line up (and conjugate) words on the spot.
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26 / M / San Diego, CA
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/24/17
At school they start you off with hiragana. The book we used was GENKI second edition published by The Japan times.

I can't speak the language very well but I understand enough incase I got into trouble. It definitely helped when I went to Japan last April, I knew enough to have simple conversations or correct my buddies and the shop keepers/bar tenders misunderstandings. It's surprising how easy it is to learn a language when you consume media you really enjoy and are subject to the same words over and over. I watch anime, watch foreing movies and like listening to some Japanese rap. After a couple of years enough stuck to where it made class easier but it's not always the same for everyone.
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