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Post Reply Those with bad grammar aren't intelligent?
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Posted 5/15/16 , edited 5/15/16
Grammar mistakes when you know how to do it correctly is sloppy. I've been guilty of doing this too when in a hurry.

I love this clip

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAfKFKBlZbM

In this satire of Life of Brian, a man writing graffiti gets caught except the Roman soldier was more horrified at his bad grammar than the act of graffiti. He punished the man by making him write the correct phrase of "Romans go home in Latin" numerous times on the wall.
Sogno- 
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Posted 5/15/16 , edited 5/15/16
well i'll be honest i get irked when i see "your" and "you're" mixed up as well as other homonyms but i mean?? i get people aren't good with grammar, they may be like math wizards or something lol. it doesn't show lack of intelligence, just a lack of understanding of grammar. and then of course even the best editors/writers make mistakes. it happens

just... if you're not good with grammar, have someone check over your papers before you turn them in
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Posted 5/15/16 , edited 5/15/16

Schmooples wrote:Your constant use of run-on sentences (the only punctuation being the rare period or misused ellipsis) makes reading anything you type a major chore for me, and so I will often not read what you say. I'm not trying to be mean by any stretch, but you have to see where people are coming from when they try to enforce certain grammatical rules. It makes a major difference. People have a reason for pushing these rules, and they are valid so long as it isn't stretched into territory it doesn't belong.


One's sentences, especially when taking the time to type them out, give the people impression from grammar in posts the old observation that 9 times out of 10, "Posters think like they type".
Random misspelled words, run-on sentence fragments joined together, "lol" and other personal editorials in the middle of it...These are the pitfalls that distinguish actual Internet conversation from "Series of brainfart-impulse synapses somehow cybernetically linked to a keyboard".

Which causes posters to wonder about the condition of the poster, and said brain, when posting. Judgmental, yes, but such is the outside world and its obligations thereto.
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 5/15/16
To be honest, I hate terrible grammar when it comes to myself. But the fact that I am getting older and a little forgetful makes me angry. I actually like Grammar Nazis because they know how important grammar is. I rather have good grammar than bad. I don't care about everyone else's grammar and is only concern with my grammar. Grammar is important to me since I aim to be a good writer.
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20 / M / Eng Land
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Posted 5/15/16 , edited 5/15/16
I appreciate good grammar, and I think there's a cut-off point where someone's grammar actually can be considered a representation of their intelligence if it's just 'that bad', but at the same time it's not the only indicator of intelligence. We all have our own strengths and weaknesses, and to claim that someone's language skills solely determine their mental ability in every aspect is a very broad and uneducated accusation to make. I wanted to be an author when I was younger so I made sure to keep my spelling and grammar standards up to snuff, but that doesn't mean I'm incredibly intelligent just because I perform adequately in that one area. Good grammar can come with intelligence as a lot of smart people do their best to exercise it, but it's not the only thing that counts. That being said, it never hurts to make sure you're conveying yourself as accurately as possible, and if you're in a professional setting then yeah, proofread that shit.
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Posted 5/15/16
The common insult of calling someone stupid because they have bad grammar or spelling is unjustifiable, but occasionally useful. I reserve it for people who are being rude and insulting others' intelligence while simultaneously posting poorly-written, error-ridden comments. Also, although bad grammar is not indicative of low intelligence, I would discourage it since more conventional grammar and spelling makes communication easier between groups of people who, although speakers of the same language, talk very differently from each other.
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22 / F / Wisconsin
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Posted 5/17/16 , edited 5/17/16
its because people are stupid and think the best way to win an argument is to point out people's bad grammar. People are also stupid and don't realize this is the internet, when texting lingo and various other vernacular is acceptable. Yes if you are trying to make a proper point its good to make sure to use complete sentences and not shorten every word or use an emoji in place of a word BUT some people just like to nit pick.

I sometimes don't use the proper "your vs youre" because if i'm really fired up and typing fast, I don't give a shit about proper grammar to be quite honest.
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20 / M / Bundaberg, Queens...
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Posted 5/17/16
Really impressed with the comments hear and can agree with them.

Just goes to show that a lot of us aren't like that and can understand.
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27 / F / The Ivory Tower
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Posted 5/17/16
I'm not a linguist, so I may not be using the right terms here.

Standards have their reasons for existing - often because they're useful in some sense. (Though useful isn't the same as good; the Marxist would say that many standards function primarily to suppress the lower classes.) Grammar does more than keep conversations understandable; it also signals to the audience that the person speaking has a certain training corresponding to a standard type of language game. The moral guides of this game are clarity, respect for the audience, and accessibility: by taking the time to follow a set of rules, the speaker evinces a respect for the people listening - because it's easier for people to listen and respond to words organized by a grammar.

Broadly, grammar can refer to any type of rule for organizing communication - so that I could speak of the grammar of texts or anime forums. We routinely drop capitalization and punctuation in texts, because they don't really matter there. Texts aren't how our civilization records its knowledge or investigates deep questions; they're how we remind someone to pick up bananas at the store. Thinking this way, it's easy to see that grammar nazis are fundamentally wrongheaded: grammatical rules don't exist for their own sake, but rather to facilitate understanding, and more than one set of rules can do that. Humans made the rules, after all; they're not derivable from the universe. But break the rules too much and people won't understand you - and not only that, they'll get the impression you don't care about being understood.

The latter may sound unfair, but I think it isn't. Because even if I'm speaking for my own selfish reasons, I'm speaking to other people - and more than that, expecting them to listen. All normal communication comes with that assumption. So if I ignore following the rules designed to help people listen to and understand what I'm saying, it's easy to wonder if I care about those people at all.

As always, the internet is the weird and difficult case: it's so democratic (once you're on it) and so easy to communicate on it that nothing really keeps people following any one set of rules. So conversations that might normally benefit from strict grammar don't have it and become confusing. Further, the structure of the internet does very little to remind people of the respect they ought to have for their audiences. And then there are trolls...

So I think the best thing we can do is think about who we're talking/posting to as we make posts and adjust accordingly. Primarily that'll function to make us less asshole-y, but it'll also make us more understandable.
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21 / M / U.S.A.
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Posted 5/17/16 , edited 5/17/16
My comma placement was abysmal when I started posting here. Pretty much kept going to improve my written speech more. Although I still make mistakes from time to time. Still improving on syntax and word usage which is especially a problem since I typically keep my sentences concise and near devoid of context.

Why is this relevant? Because intelligence is relative, and at the very least I can reasonably assume that I'm not stupid, but I make mistakes all the time.

Stupidity is bred from close-mindedness or an unwillingness or inability to learn, and just because people make mistakes doesn't mean that they won't have something of merit to contribute to any given conversation.
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Posted 5/17/16
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27 / F / The Ivory Tower
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Posted 5/17/16 , edited 5/17/16
Oh, I went on and rambled and forgot the original question.

Good grammar is less about intelligence and more about "learnedness". You can be a quick fellow and understand a lot without possessing a lot of factual or structural knowledge, and you can also be a dim-witted fellow with a lot of information in your head. By teaching grammar, formal instruction tends to instill in students the motions of grammar - which provide clarity, respect, and accessibility - even as it neglects to say that those are the values behind grammar. I definitely was never taught that grammar exists to help people, but I was initiated into grammar so that I played the game properly. As a result, I learned that grammar was annoying - and thus a tool with which to annoy others. Hence the grammar nazi. I myself knew better than to be a grammar nazi, but still I felt superior to other people for my knowledge. And it's hard to shake that.

So I tend not to think that people with bad grammar are unintelligent. Not everyone is great at being trained, and the internet makes it easy to slacken one's standards. But I do tend to think that people who know grammar and yet use poor grammar when talking about complicated things - where poor grammar causes confusion - are just as bad as grammar nazis (and maybe worse, as at least you can understand grammar nazis). Because both show they don't really care about what communication is for: conveying ideas to other people.
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Posted 5/17/16 , edited 5/17/16
For me it depends on the situation. If I'm just browsing the internet and people use bad grammar I'm like "Whatever it is the internet, it doesn't really matter." I don't expect proper grammar online since most people just type fast and hit submit. I honestly hate the people that will post a reply of just *you're" if you type youre or any other sort of grammatical error.

However, if it is an important document like a paper/application, I am very critical of it. There have been times where I haven't hired someone because of grammatical mistakes/misspelling regardless of their qualifications since it makes it seem like said person doesn't care. It doesn't make them look unintelligent but it does make them look lazy. Which to me automatically disqualifies you from a job.

In summary- If it's the internet who cares about grammar. If it's any sort of document then it is 100% important and should always be correct since every single program has a spell/grammar check.
Posted 5/20/16

I come from a family that has horrible grammar. I guess it just comes with the package of growing up in certain areas. I used to correct them all the time but it wouldn't work. I wouldn't say it makes them unintelligent. I'd say its just a learned habit/dialect. Sure, anyone can pick up a book and learn proper English. I think it's more of a conditioned response than anything else. The way people speak is up to them.

They'll say "warsher" for washer and speak in double negatives. Nowadays that shows that you can't do something. Now they teach you exactly how to write to make it in a career. So the people who speak differently are harassed for it. I've learned many things from my mom and shes usually right.

I would like to point out on my own behalf that I constantly spell the same things wrong. It gets really annoying but everyone has that one thing they struggle with if you aren't born a genius. I'd say a genius wouldn't forget small things like that. I know I can't hold information as well as others and in some prospects that can easily put me in a bad position whenever I want to explain something. I get information mixed up as well. I know my weaknesses but there are things people can do to condition themselves away from any bad habit or thing. So if that were the case then the way we speak is completely by choice.
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Posted 5/20/16
I actually completely agree with you. When I'm typing or writing i dont always use the best grammar until its necessarily needed. I'm not a boring english teacher or anything of that sort. I rather show character in my writing/typing not intelligence 24/7, doesnt mean its not there in me.
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