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Post Reply What sort of school did you go to?
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19 / M / east coast. Let t...
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Posted 5/24/16
What was it like?
I went to public school with all the other brats. I can't really complain too much about it because I don't know what other schools are like except for one.

For one year of High school I went to the Crossroads Center.
It was a school for people with bad grades and who were problem kids. A requirement to get in was that you had to be suspended at least once. We wore uniforms and I really didn't mind it too much. It was one fancy school. You got up pretty late for school and you got off a little later than regular school. You had one group of classmates. It never alternated so you knew everyone in your class by name. We had a paper we carried with us that kept track of our behavior. I was very well behaved so I was almost always on the "independent" stage. Every Wednesday was a field trip for those who behaved and a study and make up day for those who didn't and it was always a half day. We just had a goof-off day once a week because we'd just go on a field trip to like some place where the police would hang out and play video games or play basketball and we didn't have to wear our uniforms on those days. The school was extremely laid back. I mentioned make up days before. That meant we could take assignments we did poorly on and do them again and if we did better we would receive that grade instead. It was meant to improve us as people and it really worked too. Many of us improved our grades spectacularly. The teachers were really cool too. About that good behavior of mine. The only reason I actually made it into the school is because we had my middle school principal mark down that I had been suspended so I could get in. They always asked me what I was in for and I could never tell them. The truth is that I made it in because of falsified documents. Hahaha
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24 / F / United States, DE
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Posted 5/24/16
I went to a public high school, which was just what you'd expect. There were plenty of kids there who made it obvious that they had no interest in public education.

I was pretty quiet, and only kept to my group of friends, so I never attracted much attention.

As far as what it was like, the only real structural requirement besides for core classes was that we had to pick electives all four years that followed a 'career pathway'. I chose animal science as mine.

College was a lot better imo.
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27 / F / Nirn
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Posted 5/24/16 , edited 5/24/16
I went to a rough middle school on the bad side of town. Me and two others were the only different ethnic groups from the entire school. So I endured a lot of racism, but it was never a violent kind. Teachers hardly taught, they would get overwhelmed by students and didn't even bother when that happened. I got high marks in my classes, which was often a result to bullying. I even represented the school with a gold medal in Science, and met our governor to discuss the educational conditions of children from bad homes. It wasn't all bad. Despite all that, I met some really nice people. My skills in artistry grew, the school had one of the best art and theater programs around. I was in an art group of eight that painted a mural for 9/11. I grew up too fast in that school but it prepared me for a lot of things in life. It was also a hard time at home. My father left and my mother went through surgery that took a lot out of her check at the beginning. So we were forced to move in that kind of environment. We never lived off the government though, and my mother never took any handouts. I also kept my morals intact, and had a good head on my shoulders from how I was raised. I took up violin and drums here, it was a means of escape at the time but I'm glad I chose to study music.

High school was different. I didn't like it much. It was a private school and most of the students were a bit snobbish. My dad came back and we built a business, so the income was great. Yet we were a humble family by nature, and didn't really fit in with the scene. I had three really good friends that weren't so out of touch with reality. Here I furthered my art. Painting, sculpting- etc. But it was a lonely time. Even my introvertedness was a target for some. I got told "I guess you think you're too good for us?" a lot. I have no idea why they wasted time on me to be honest. I was clearly just different from everyone. I also dated two jerks in my process of trying to find a place there. Eventually I was glad that I stayed rooted to myself. My life could have been very different if I strayed, into the crowd.

College was great! I finally met a social group that was preparing for adulthood and everything in-between. I miss my college days the most.
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19 / M / Fukang, Xinjiang,...
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Posted 5/24/16 , edited 5/24/16
Went to a Royal Grammar School. Don't have to pay a penny but we end up with much better grades etc than those who go to private schools and pay absurd amounts of money each year...

The Royal bit doesn't mean much (if anything) today, but the school is very old, so received charters to educate students from Henry VIII and Elizabeth I back in the 1500s. Grammar school just refers to the fact that it is selective - no attention is really paid to location or how rich or poor you are, but to get in you take a test aged 11. The top 100 or so who take the test get places.

I know a lot of people with many different schooling background from the UK alone, and my experience was very different from many people. For the first five years (aged 11-16) the school only accepts boys (there is a similar school about 1km away only for girls), so there is a real competitiveness in EVERYTHING - grades, art, and especially sports. Sports were competitive both within the school and against other local schools, often weekly rugby (winter) and cricket (summer) fixtures. Did the vast majority of us good to be honest...
People weren't made fun of for being clever. A fair few teachers were either former students or had been there for years - they don't get paid any more that teachers at any other school though I believe. There was also a big sense of school pride that I haven't seen in other places.

Aged 16, when we finish GCSEs and start studying our selected A-Levels for getting into University, another 80-90 students are admitted, with admission being open at this point to all genders, rather than just boys. At GCSE the school is a good performer, but for the last ten years we ended up top in the UK for A-Level results, by one measure or another.

Most in the UK go to secondary school aged 11-16 and then sixth form from age 16-18, unlike in the US, but at my school you enter age 11 and spend your whole school career in the same place - from 11-18.


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30 / M
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Posted 5/24/16
Seems this is mostly referring to high school, so I'll stick with that.

I went to a public high school, a very tiny one. My graduating class was only about 80-100 people, so even if I wasn't the most popular guy in school I knew absolutely everybody to at least some degree.

I also spent a lot of time going to the tech/career school attached to our high school. Took things like construction trades, etc. but most of all I spent years in the engineering program there, which gave me a leg up on many of my peers when I went to college for it.

Only detention I ever had was from flirting with a girl during a free period when the teacher was in a foul mood. I actually got picked up by the cops once with a friend during school hours and I talked our way out of it with no punishment, so I suppose they were fairly laid back about discipline overall. That officer.. she was so pissed.
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20 / M / Indiana
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Posted 5/24/16 , edited 5/24/16
attended a public high school full of sneakerheads, weight lifters and juggalos. Not to mention the group of kids who wore tails. Needless to say it was a very gay time
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46 / F / Reston, VA, USA
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Posted 5/24/16
My parents sent me to private church run schools from 1st grade through college. Kindergarten was the only time I was in a public school. Also, since my mother was a teacher herself, they moved me around to different schools several times to put me in classes where my mom thought the teacher was the best for that grade. This meant that I was perpetually the new kid in class, because in our area for the most part if you go to these church schools everyone starts together and the class stays together till graduation and very few parents change their kids school unless they move totally out of the area, for instance to be missionaries.

Being the new kid all the time meant I got my share of bullying and teasing. I just ignored it for the most part. I found that it irritated the bullies more if I did not react than if I did.

So for high school, my first two years were in a local private school, and I'd been there a year or so already but didn't really have any close friends because everyone had already been in cliques when I transferred in there. My junior and senior years I was finally able to convince my parents to send me to a boarding school. Most of the kids there felt like the school rules were way too harsh and like they were in a prison. To me it was like being free for the first time in my life, because I was so sick of my parents hovering and sticking their noses into everything. As long as I didn't break the rules, I was free to do a lot of stuff I'd never have been allowed at home. So those were actually two of the best years I can remember. Even though I was the new kid because I came in halfway through high school and most of the kids were 4 year seniors and got medals for it, I made a lot of good friends. I was sort of outside all the cliques, but had friends in most of them, and among those who were more invisible/outcast types. We had our 25th class reunion 2 years ago and it was cool. It's funny how when you go back for reunions a lot of the people who were jacka$$es to you come back and try to apologize. I guess people eventually really do grow up and mature.
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42 / M
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Posted 5/24/16 , edited 5/24/16


Okay it wasn't that bad but I grew up in the city and then moved to a really small country town. There was a bit of a culture shock and all the girls had been dating their boyfriends since the second grade so there wasn't many available options for dating. Not that it would have mattered much since I was so antisocial but the thought of having a chance would have been nice lol.

It actually wasn't that bad. School in the city sucked too. Me and high school just didn't get along. I just don't like being told when I can and cannot go take a leak. Don't tell me we're all adults now and that I should act like one and then make me raise my hand to go potty. It sends mixed signals. I was always getting written up for leaving class without permission. Eventually my teachers got tired of writing me up and knew I was just going to the restroom so they stopped. I think by that point they were just glad I was still showing up occassionally. I eventually quit and got a GED. That was one of the best decisions I'd ever made. I did like my typing and computer teacher though. She was pretty awesome and taught me how to type 120wpm. I still couldn't beat her speed.

I prefer being in the country now. It was just boring when I was younger. Now boring isn't so bad. It's preferable to having a high crime rate and once you're old enough to drive it's a lot better.
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20 / M / North Carolina
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Posted 5/24/16
Public school for all of it.
In a bit of a small town, so it wasn't particularly great, but it was okay.

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26 / F / hell's grave
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Posted 5/24/16
For high school, I went to the rough school. The ghetto school, the "school where bad kids go to." My high school was seen as the worst in the county. Which made me terrified of going. But it was not that bad. I mean if you stayed out of trouble there were fights everyday of every lunch period. Bomb threats, stabbings, death threats, you name it. Bunch of kids tried to bring in knifes or guns. My school didn't have a metal detector, so they were able to get away with bringing whatever . However you always see bunch of cops in front of the school during school hours. I entered with about 1k-2k students. Only about 700 graduated. Teachers weren't that great either, since a lot of the students didn't really care. And "advanced" classes really weren't that advanced, since a lot of the time kids who didn't care ended up there. Once I was even accused of cheating. And like three of my teachers were def not on my side. Some jealous jerk, hated me and made up some serious shit. I almost got suspended, but I proved them jerks of teachers wrong. The girl ended up being suspended. I also had a guidance counselor who told me I have no future because I was from this school and part Hispanic. I LOL'd so hard. It's sad though, that's why a lot of the kids never took school seriously.

I met some cool people when I enrolled into the ROTC program. That's where I found my two former best friends. I think that was the best part of my high school years. We all stuck together, those who were in the program. Although bunch of drama happened it was still cool.
I had a bunch of enemies though. A lot of people knew who I was before I even knew who they were. People tried to fight me, say racist shit. Because my school was 99% majority of blacks and Hispanics, the Caucasian mistreated a lot of us. And no joke some teachers as well. Don't even get me started how the teachers treated the special Ed kids.

But yea high school, I wouldn't want to relive that .
Posted 5/24/16
I went to a school that sold crack I had teachers that smoked weed serious no joke! I just basicly did my time
never got messed up in the drugs.. The good stuff thinking? Oh yeh, we had surfers it was a beach town some a few my friends made it to pro surfing others well lets just say a early grave they hit to much cocaine
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M / An Island off the...
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Posted 5/24/16 , edited 5/24/16
Here in the UK we have to wear school uniforms but i think its less strict. My high school especially helped people who had problems (Don't worry i didn't have any metal problems, the school was good at handling situations) Luckily my school was in a "good area" and didn't have many thugs going to it xD
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27 / F / The Ivory Tower
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Posted 5/24/16
Homeschooled.
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21 / M / Shinjuku, Tokyo
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Posted 5/24/16
Private Christian school.
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UK
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Posted 5/24/16 , edited 5/24/16
Well my family moved countries so I had to move schools. I started out in a state school but that school was rough with low standards and all the other good schools had long waiting lists and or were Catholic. I'm not Catholic they wouldn't take me or my siblings. That left private school so that's what my parents went for. For secondary education I went to a girls' grammar type school. They stream in the Caribbean. You take an exam at age 11. In a way it reminds me of the old 11+ exam that some still take in the UK to go to elite old style grammar schools which may be private or state or religious with some state funding. Those that take this exam in the UK usually are from private schools or had private tutors after state school hours one year or more before the exam. The UK exam is not compulsory and most do no take it. In the Caribbean it is compulsory to take the exam and it's a national exam. The top schools in the Caribbean take all the A students, B schools get average students and C schools get what's left. Those that failed exams may have a school or centre for them to attend but provision isn't so good for this. My school was a top school. Many parents send their children to after school tutors/classes a year or more before the exam at 11 then again in time for national exams at ages 16 and 18. At 16 we moved back to the UK days after I had sat my national exams. In fact the whole family went on ahead to the UK without me the previous month because I had to finish exams. I stayed with my grandparents sat my last exam and was on the plane the next day. I spent my last year in a state school in the UK then moved to a college.
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