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Post Reply Why don't people like to have conversations these days?
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Posted 6/18/16
I think the basic premise of this thread is flawed, as proven by the same.
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18 / M / The Mothership
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Posted 6/18/16

electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Hrafna wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Hail_King_Kakao wrote:

I love talking to people.
It's a shame that a lot of people are boring. Including me.


stop being boring, and start being interesting. Here is a tip to be interesting. Tip 1, take up radical politics. Tip 2, listen to rage against the machine to confirm your radical political beliefs



Or just listen to Rage Against because the beat is ok.


What do you mean the beat? Rage isn't techno. It doesn't have that boots n cats type beat on loop for 4 minutes. Nah. It is an experience. there are multiple beats via the bass, drums, and whatever strange noise tom morello decides to do on his guitar at that particular moment. The rage does not come from the beat, it comes from within. If it was just the beat, the group would just be machine instead of rage against the machine. It is a symbiotic relationship of sorts.


Chill listen to some P-Funk man.


George Clinton is the man, man. I do dabble in some p-funk and other funk sub-genres. I dabble in some sly stone, earth wind and fire, ohio players, red hot chili peppers, and at the far end of the spectrum: primus.


You and I both know he is and it's always good to meet a brother under the Funk. All very good Funk bands and not too many people know that Funk more specifically George Clinton produced RHCP.


but if you want to know a huge influence on RHCP, then look up a band called Gang of Four. Look up some tracks from their 1979 album entertainment. Each song has some crazy nice bass lines and the guitarist Andy Gill is unique to say the least. Funkiest band from Britain that I have ever heard

If it's Funk I will I'm a student of Funk and it always brings joy to me when I find someone who is a Funkateer. There are some English bands I really enjoy like Art Of Noise or Loose Ends and this group is Scottish, Average White Band. You probably know 2 out of 3 of those bands.
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Posted 6/18/16

Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Hrafna wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Hail_King_Kakao wrote:

I love talking to people.
It's a shame that a lot of people are boring. Including me.


stop being boring, and start being interesting. Here is a tip to be interesting. Tip 1, take up radical politics. Tip 2, listen to rage against the machine to confirm your radical political beliefs



Or just listen to Rage Against because the beat is ok.


What do you mean the beat? Rage isn't techno. It doesn't have that boots n cats type beat on loop for 4 minutes. Nah. It is an experience. there are multiple beats via the bass, drums, and whatever strange noise tom morello decides to do on his guitar at that particular moment. The rage does not come from the beat, it comes from within. If it was just the beat, the group would just be machine instead of rage against the machine. It is a symbiotic relationship of sorts.


Chill listen to some P-Funk man.


George Clinton is the man, man. I do dabble in some p-funk and other funk sub-genres. I dabble in some sly stone, earth wind and fire, ohio players, red hot chili peppers, and at the far end of the spectrum: primus.


You and I both know he is and it's always good to meet a brother under the Funk. All very good Funk bands and not too many people know that Funk more specifically George Clinton produced RHCP.


but if you want to know a huge influence on RHCP, then look up a band called Gang of Four. Look up some tracks from their 1979 album entertainment. Each song has some crazy nice bass lines and the guitarist Andy Gill is unique to say the least. Funkiest band from Britain that I have ever heard

If it's Funk I will I'm a student of Funk and it always brings joy to me when I find someone who is a Funkateer. There are some English bands I really enjoy like Art Of Noise or Loose Ends and this group is Scottish, Average White Band. You probably know 2 out of 3 of those bands.


I'd describe gang of four as funk-punk, similar to red hot chili peppers. And yeah, I know average white band. When I was getting into funk, I wanted to get into both funkadelic and parliament. Ironically, funkadelic sounded more psychedelic than funk in most cases. Whereas parliament was funk all the way. If you know funk, I will ask you a question that you probably know. Who is famous for starting the style of slap-bass playing and what band was he in?
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Posted 6/18/16 , edited 6/18/16

electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Hrafna wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Hail_King_Kakao wrote:

I love talking to people.
It's a shame that a lot of people are boring. Including me.


stop being boring, and start being interesting. Here is a tip to be interesting. Tip 1, take up radical politics. Tip 2, listen to rage against the machine to confirm your radical political beliefs



Or just listen to Rage Against because the beat is ok.


What do you mean the beat? Rage isn't techno. It doesn't have that boots n cats type beat on loop for 4 minutes. Nah. It is an experience. there are multiple beats via the bass, drums, and whatever strange noise tom morello decides to do on his guitar at that particular moment. The rage does not come from the beat, it comes from within. If it was just the beat, the group would just be machine instead of rage against the machine. It is a symbiotic relationship of sorts.


Chill listen to some P-Funk man.


George Clinton is the man, man. I do dabble in some p-funk and other funk sub-genres. I dabble in some sly stone, earth wind and fire, ohio players, red hot chili peppers, and at the far end of the spectrum: primus.


You and I both know he is and it's always good to meet a brother under the Funk. All very good Funk bands and not too many people know that Funk more specifically George Clinton produced RHCP.


but if you want to know a huge influence on RHCP, then look up a band called Gang of Four. Look up some tracks from their 1979 album entertainment. Each song has some crazy nice bass lines and the guitarist Andy Gill is unique to say the least. Funkiest band from Britain that I have ever heard

If it's Funk I will I'm a student of Funk and it always brings joy to me when I find someone who is a Funkateer. There are some English bands I really enjoy like Art Of Noise or Loose Ends and this group is Scottish, Average White Band. You probably know 2 out of 3 of those bands.


I'd describe gang of four as funk-punk, similar to red hot chili peppers. And yeah, I know average white band. When I was getting into funk, I wanted to get into both funkadelic and parliament. Ironically, funkadelic sounded more psychedelic than funk in most cases. Whereas parliament was funk all the way. If you know funk, I will ask you a question that you probably know. Who is famous for starting the style of slap-bass playing and what band was he in?


Larry Graham of Sly & The Family Stone but Flea and Bootsy Collins use it a lot and the great thing about Funk is it's not one genre, but multiple genres Parliament-Funkadelic proved this because they switched up a lot one moment they were a Rock band another moment they're playing Reggae or straight up Funk.
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Posted 6/18/16 , edited 6/18/16

Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Hrafna wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Hail_King_Kakao wrote:

I love talking to people.
It's a shame that a lot of people are boring. Including me.


stop being boring, and start being interesting. Here is a tip to be interesting. Tip 1, take up radical politics. Tip 2, listen to rage against the machine to confirm your radical political beliefs



Or just listen to Rage Against because the beat is ok.


What do you mean the beat? Rage isn't techno. It doesn't have that boots n cats type beat on loop for 4 minutes. Nah. It is an experience. there are multiple beats via the bass, drums, and whatever strange noise tom morello decides to do on his guitar at that particular moment. The rage does not come from the beat, it comes from within. If it was just the beat, the group would just be machine instead of rage against the machine. It is a symbiotic relationship of sorts.


Chill listen to some P-Funk man.


George Clinton is the man, man. I do dabble in some p-funk and other funk sub-genres. I dabble in some sly stone, earth wind and fire, ohio players, red hot chili peppers, and at the far end of the spectrum: primus.


You and I both know he is and it's always good to meet a brother under the Funk. All very good Funk bands and not too many people know that Funk more specifically George Clinton produced RHCP.


but if you want to know a huge influence on RHCP, then look up a band called Gang of Four. Look up some tracks from their 1979 album entertainment. Each song has some crazy nice bass lines and the guitarist Andy Gill is unique to say the least. Funkiest band from Britain that I have ever heard

If it's Funk I will I'm a student of Funk and it always brings joy to me when I find someone who is a Funkateer. There are some English bands I really enjoy like Art Of Noise or Loose Ends and this group is Scottish, Average White Band. You probably know 2 out of 3 of those bands.


I'd describe gang of four as funk-punk, similar to red hot chili peppers. And yeah, I know average white band. When I was getting into funk, I wanted to get into both funkadelic and parliament. Ironically, funkadelic sounded more psychedelic than funk in most cases. Whereas parliament was funk all the way. If you know funk, I will ask you a question that you probably know. Who is famous for starting the style of slap-bass playing and what band was he in?


Larry Graham of Sly & The Family Stone but Flea and Bootsy Collins use it a lot and the great thing about Funk is it's not one genre, but multiple genres Parliament-Funkadelic proved this because they switched up a lot one moment they were a Rock band another moment they're playing Reggae or straight up Funk.

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Posted 6/18/16
you do know your stuff. I think in a lot of cases, funk as a whole kind of delves into other genres too such as soul and R&B. Disco was an obvious ripoff of funk too, although people such as George Clinton gave disco considerable criticism. I've noticed that in practically every genre that their core beginnings are rooted in or popularized by black culture. Genres such as funk and rap make sense due to the fact that most of the participants in the genre happen to be black. But, you can look at genres such as rock n roll that had famous performers such as chuck berry making records and performing before acts like Elvis Presley got most of the credit. Also, rock n roll is credited with being a sort of sub-genre of blues and jazz, two genres filled and popularized by black performers. dance music in general needs to give credit to genres such as funk. Genres such as funk and jazz were the original types of dance music. Where would EDM and even pop music as a whole exist without it. Even punk rock needs to give credit to black people. There was a band that was unknown for years called death that would have had a hand in its overall direction. Also, one of the first hardcore punk bands called bad brains. Plus, funk might as well popularized the playing of the bass and blues popularized the use of the guitar. Music history is interesting overall.
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Posted 6/18/16

electricdoomfire wrote:

you do know your stuff. I think in a lot of cases, funk as a whole kind of delves into other genres too such as soul and R&B. Disco was an obvious ripoff of funk too, although people such as George Clinton gave disco considerable criticism. I've noticed that in practically every genre that their core beginnings are rooted in or popularized by black culture. Genres such as funk and rap make sense due to the fact that most of the participants in the genre happen to be black. But, you can look at genres such as rock n roll that had famous performers such as chuck berry making records and performing before acts like Elvis Presley got most of the credit. Also, rock n roll is credited with being a sort of sub-genre of blues and jazz, two genres filled and popularized by black performers. dance music in general needs to give credit to genres such as funk. Genres such as funk and jazz were the original types of dance music. Where would EDM and even pop music as a whole exist without it. Even punk rock needs to give credit to black people. There was a band that was unknown for years called death that would have had a hand in its overall direction. Also, one of the first hardcore punk bands called bad brains. Plus, funk might as well popularized the playing of the bass and blues popularized the use of the guitar. Music history is interesting overall.


It's always a pleasure to meet another musichead like myself and yes even during the British Invasion you could hear Black music in there but the groups wouldn't tell you they were plagiarizing and not crediting and Funk has so far had a everlasting effect on music and to your point Disco tried to imitate Funk but everything in it sounded the same. That's why Funk is still around today and Disco died out and Disco was the whole basis for Parliament's Funkentelechy Vs. The Placebo Syndrome.
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Posted 6/18/16
I always kind of disliked how a ton of bands had bass guitar just act as the bottom sound while the electric guitar took all the sound. Sometimes when I listen to certain bands, I can't even hear bass. That gets me because bass guitar has such great sound. I'm always like "Turn it up!". I do like to hear some good electric guitar most of the time, but I would prefer a sound where the bass and lead are played interchangeably. That is what I love about gang of four. ironically, most of my favorite bassists aren't from funk. I prefer to look into underrated bassists for the most part. I know technicality is a part of it, but I just like bass that I can hear and sounds good. I like to look into bassists from the rock genre. For me, my favorite bassists are Dennis Dunnaway, the original Alice cooper bassist back when they were a band instead of just one person. I also love Peter Hook from Joy Division, his bass his just so ominous and smooth. The bassists for Aerosmith and Interpol are great too. Tony Levin from king crimson is extremely unique too. Who are your favorite bassists? I'm going to guess that one of them is bootsy Collins.
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Posted 6/18/16 , edited 6/18/16

electricdoomfire wrote:

I always kind of disliked how a ton of bands had bass guitar just act as the bottom sound while the electric guitar took all the sound. Sometimes when I listen to certain bands, I can't even hear bass. That gets me because bass guitar has such great sound. I'm always like "Turn it up!". I do like to hear some good electric guitar most of the time, but I would prefer a sound where the bass and lead are played interchangeably. That is what I love about gang of four. ironically, most of my favorite bassists aren't from funk. I prefer to look into underrated bassists for the most part. I know technicality is a part of it, but I just like bass that I can hear and sounds good. I like to look into bassists from the rock genre. For me, my favorite bassists are Dennis Dunnaway, the original Alice cooper bassist back when they were a band instead of just one person. I also love Peter Hook from Joy Division, his bass his just so ominous and smooth. The bassists for Aerosmith and Interpol are great too. Tony Levin from king crimson is extremely unique too. Who are your favorite bassists? I'm going to guess that one of them is bootsy Collins.


You're right one of them is Bootsy Collins in fact he is my most favorite Bass player and in the words of George Clinton that man was/is too talented to be just another player in the band so that's how Bootsy's Rubber Band came about and since then Bootsy has worked with many artists like Buckethead. Another one is also a P-Funk product, Billy" Bass" Nelson and on guitars I love Jimi Hendrix, he inspired Bootsy and 2 other P-Funk products in Eddie Hazel and Mike Hampton there's a lot to it.
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Posted 6/18/16

Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:

I always kind of disliked how a ton of bands had bass guitar just act as the bottom sound while the electric guitar took all the sound. Sometimes when I listen to certain bands, I can't even hear bass. That gets me because bass guitar has such great sound. I'm always like "Turn it up!". I do like to hear some good electric guitar most of the time, but I would prefer a sound where the bass and lead are played interchangeably. That is what I love about gang of four. ironically, most of my favorite bassists aren't from funk. I prefer to look into underrated bassists for the most part. I know technicality is a part of it, but I just like bass that I can hear and sounds good. I like to look into bassists from the rock genre. For me, my favorite bassists are Dennis Dunnaway, the original Alice cooper bassist back when they were a band instead of just one person. I also love Peter Hook from Joy Division, his bass his just so ominous and smooth. The bassists for Aerosmith and Interpol are great too. Tony Levin from king crimson is extremely unique too. Who are your favorite bassists? I'm going to guess that one of them is bootsy Collins.


You're right one of them is Bootsy Collins in fact he is my most favorite Bass player and in the words of George Clinton that man was/is too talented to be just another player in the band so that's how Bootsy's Rubber Band came about and since then Bootsy has worked with many artists like Buckethead. Another one is also a P-Funk product, Billy" Bass" Nelson and on guitars I love Jimi Hendrix, he inspired Bootsy and 2 other P-Funk products in Eddie Hazel and Mike Hampton there's a lot to it.


Any other bassists in some other genres, perhaps some that you might considered obviously influenced by funk?

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Posted 6/18/16
Too many crazy people.......I rest my case.
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Posted 6/18/16

VZ68 wrote:

Too many crazy people.......I rest my case.


What case? Case of what? What's in the case? Maybe it is a box. WHAT'S IN THE BOX?

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Posted 6/18/16 , edited 6/18/16

electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:

I always kind of disliked how a ton of bands had bass guitar just act as the bottom sound while the electric guitar took all the sound. Sometimes when I listen to certain bands, I can't even hear bass. That gets me because bass guitar has such great sound. I'm always like "Turn it up!". I do like to hear some good electric guitar most of the time, but I would prefer a sound where the bass and lead are played interchangeably. That is what I love about gang of four. ironically, most of my favorite bassists aren't from funk. I prefer to look into underrated bassists for the most part. I know technicality is a part of it, but I just like bass that I can hear and sounds good. I like to look into bassists from the rock genre. For me, my favorite bassists are Dennis Dunnaway, the original Alice cooper bassist back when they were a band instead of just one person. I also love Peter Hook from Joy Division, his bass his just so ominous and smooth. The bassists for Aerosmith and Interpol are great too. Tony Levin from king crimson is extremely unique too. Who are your favorite bassists? I'm going to guess that one of them is bootsy Collins.


You're right one of them is Bootsy Collins in fact he is my most favorite Bass player and in the words of George Clinton that man was/is too talented to be just another player in the band so that's how Bootsy's Rubber Band came about and since then Bootsy has worked with many artists like Buckethead. Another one is also a P-Funk product, Billy" Bass" Nelson and on guitars I love Jimi Hendrix, he inspired Bootsy and 2 other P-Funk products in Eddie Hazel and Mike Hampton there's a lot to it.


Any other bassists in some other genres, perhaps some that you might considered obviously influenced by funk?



Can't think of any off the top of my head right now but there are artists that I can think of that was influenced by Funk like Vulfpeck, Prince, Outkast, and Daft-Punk.
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Posted 6/18/16 , edited 6/18/16
I talk to enough people during the course of work and school that in my free time I'd rather just do my own thing. The exception is my boyfriend, who I'm in consistent (albeit intermittent) contact pretty much all the time.

So, yay, I'm that awkward person who'll go to a coffee shop and sit in the corner reading this book or playing his DS because he can.
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Posted 6/18/16

Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:


Markest1 wrote:


electricdoomfire wrote:

I always kind of disliked how a ton of bands had bass guitar just act as the bottom sound while the electric guitar took all the sound. Sometimes when I listen to certain bands, I can't even hear bass. That gets me because bass guitar has such great sound. I'm always like "Turn it up!". I do like to hear some good electric guitar most of the time, but I would prefer a sound where the bass and lead are played interchangeably. That is what I love about gang of four. ironically, most of my favorite bassists aren't from funk. I prefer to look into underrated bassists for the most part. I know technicality is a part of it, but I just like bass that I can hear and sounds good. I like to look into bassists from the rock genre. For me, my favorite bassists are Dennis Dunnaway, the original Alice cooper bassist back when they were a band instead of just one person. I also love Peter Hook from Joy Division, his bass his just so ominous and smooth. The bassists for Aerosmith and Interpol are great too. Tony Levin from king crimson is extremely unique too. Who are your favorite bassists? I'm going to guess that one of them is bootsy Collins.


You're right one of them is Bootsy Collins in fact he is my most favorite Bass player and in the words of George Clinton that man was/is too talented to be just another player in the band so that's how Bootsy's Rubber Band came about and since then Bootsy has worked with many artists like Buckethead. Another one is also a P-Funk product, Billy" Bass" Nelson and on guitars I love Jimi Hendrix, he inspired Bootsy and 2 other P-Funk products in Eddie Hazel and Mike Hampton there's a lot to it.


Any other bassists in some other genres, perhaps some that you might considered obviously influenced by funk?



Can't think of any off the top of my head right now but there are artists that I can think of that was influenced by Funk like Vulfpeck, Prince, Outkast, and Daft-Punk.


yeah, I like outkast and daft punk well enough. In fact, outkast might be the only rap I really like. Daft punk is awesome too. It is nice when artists had different beats and groves to their sound instead of looping a simplistic beat over and over again. Also, trap beats are so lame. And I can't understand why certain songs have those kind of trap beats that sound all ominous and creepy. Puts me on edge, music shouldn't do that.
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