First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
Post Reply Post-College Life Advice
2432 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / KY
Offline
Posted 7/18/16
This is kind of a personal post, if you're not into that sort of thing, TL;DR.. I understand.

Anyway,

I finished my degree in May of 2014, got a good job that was 3 time zones away from my folks back home. Stayed there for a year before I realized I needed a change. Plane tickets and constant driving across the country over holidays got old. I moved back home and got another good job that I had until very recently, when I was let go.

I still do not know why, as I only got a call at 6 AM just saying not to come in. It was a contract job, with really low benefits... but good pay.

I've been unemployed for about a month and have been looking for more jobs, but it seems very difficult to get one that isn't just a minimum wage job, especially when I have a good amount of money saved up.

My options are to either

1. Wait for an application to stick somewhere for that next job

2. Take a long trip somewhere (Like Japan!) and just enjoy myself

3. Go back to school for a Master's Degree.

I'm terrible at this adulting thing, and it's laughable that i'd go to an anime forum to ask for opinions, but I really do not know what to do at this point. Thankfully, I'm only 24 so I have some time to figure shit out, but lately i've been extremely depressed. Anime has been my solace moreso than usual.

To any of you who read all of this, thank you very much. If you're not interested, that's fine too. Some people don't care about anyone's problems but their own and that is completely fine.

If you were in my shoes, what would you do? How do you adult?

TL;DR I need adult advice since I suck at it.
18767 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M / London
Offline
Posted 7/18/16
Well, about to start College/Uni here so I'll probably be of no use but getting a masters degree wouldn't really be that worth it unless your career really needs it of for any personal gain. I'd say take a nice holiday somewhere and try to find a job after it. Spoil yourself abit, its kind of annoying getting left off a job so I guess some stress would've built up. Just don't overspend on your savings and make sure you can pay rent, etc for a month or two before you find your new job.
3268 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / Somewhere...
Offline
Posted 7/18/16
For what it's worth, you only have this life. What do you want? Do you want to travel? Do you want a career? Do you want a family some day? You can have all of that, because the fact is you're young. There is no waste in seeing the world. The experience of that alone garners more insight of how the world and the people in it work.

Budget well, take some time to travel, and thoughtfully assess your situation. Weigh the pros and cons of more schooling and whether it will be truly advantageous to expanding your horizons and potential career opportunities.

"Adulting" never gets easier, trust me. But it sounds like you've got it down pretty good thus far.
11700 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
35 / M / UK
Offline
Posted 7/18/16
One key thing is that you don't leave any unexplainable gaps in your resume. Short time periods are okay when you are between jobs but big gaps make future employers wary. You can explain some gaps as a once-in-a-lifetime travel experience or caring for a sick relative but again the more "excuses" you have to put down the weaker your resume.

If you can afford it I'd suggest taking an internship or doing voluntary work for a while if you don't want to get the minimum wage stuff. Working for no or low money will at least show future employers that you aren't lazy and you can always abandon the pittance job once a better prospect pans out.
2432 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / KY
Offline
Posted 7/18/16

Akane1984 wrote:

For what it's worth, you only have this life. What do you want? Do you want to travel? Do you want a career? Do you want a family some day? You can have all of that, because the fact is you're young. There is no waste in seeing the world. The experience of that alone garners more insight of how the world and the people in it work.

Budget well, take some time to travel, and thoughtfully assess your situation. Weigh the pros and cons of more schooling and whether it will be truly advantageous to expanding your horizons and potential career opportunities.

"Adulting" never gets easier, trust me. But it sounds like you've got it down pretty good thus far.





Hey, thanks

It would be nice to travel somewhere. I've been sending out lots of applications lately and haven't gotten very far, so the extra education may help in that regard.

Also, to the other guy who commented, I appreciate it a lot. You may not be done with college yet, but it helps to see things from all perspectives. I've just never been put in a position where I've had to make hard decisions for myself until now.
3268 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / Somewhere...
Offline
Posted 7/18/16
I can definitely understand that. I have no doubt you'll do well!

I second the internship recommendation. Not knowing what it is that you've gotten a degree in, this can still really work to your advantage and take care of those gaps in work history.
2432 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / KY
Offline
Posted 7/18/16

Akane1984 wrote:

I can definitely understand that. I have no doubt you'll do well!

I second the internship recommendation. Not knowing what it is that you've gotten a degree in, this can still really work to your advantage and take care of those gaps in work history.



Geographic Information Systems. It's in the realm of IT and is a growing field that is also highly competitive. What would you consider too long? Since I finished school, 4 months was the longest I was unemployed, I try not to keep it longer than 3 if I can help it.

I didn't expect this many responses to be honest.
3268 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / Somewhere...
Offline
Posted 7/18/16
Ha, well, as someone who has helped with the family business, if a few months can be explained reasonably, I don't think about it too much. When a year passes without so much as a part time job, volunteer work, or something of that nature- red flags everywhere.

You are in a great field with lots of opportunity, and it will take a lot of tenacity to outdo the competition. Don't get burnt out in the meantime. Easier said than done, I'm sure, but you've got a really good attitude. Some of my friends who were in the same place you were several years ago are now very successful in the growing IT community. Just keep at it.
2432 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / KY
Offline
Posted 7/18/16 , edited 7/18/16

Akane1984 wrote:

Ha, well, as someone who has helped with the family business, if a few months can be explained reasonably, I don't think about it too much. When a year passes without so much as a part time job, volunteer work, or something of that nature- red flags everywhere.

You are in a great field with lots of opportunity, and it will take a lot of tenacity to outdo the competition. Don't get burnt out in the meantime. Easier said than done, I'm sure, but you've got a really good attitude. Some of my friends who were in the same place you were several years ago are now very successful in the growing IT community. Just keep at it.



From what I hear those first few years out of college are always pretty rough. I've tried to stay as positive as I can, and hopefully I get some interviews this week.
11700 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
35 / M / UK
Offline
Posted 7/19/16
As you are in the IT field another thing you can do is practice with systems you haven't used before or expand your knowledge on those you are familiar with. This will help with your resume as some companies may be looking for a GIS developer familiar with Software-X but your resume says you have only used Software-Z. In cases like that your resume would go to the bottom of the pile.

This also helps fill those gaps in your resume. Rather than say a gap was for job-hunting you can say you were training on new GIS programmes. As with taking an internship this demonstrates to employers that you are spending your time productively.

Esri's ArcGIS software has a 60 day free trial and a Google search brings back several options for Free GIS software.

In this case I'd advise against getting that Master's Degree in the short term (unless employers are specifically asking for it). I've found in the IT market that practical experience almost always trumps academic qualifications. You could spend all that time and money getting an extra qualification and find your job prospects are not much better than they are now.
Posted 7/19/16
I also graduated last 2014. We are somewhat in the same situation. To rid negativity from my life and keep myself occupied, I did volunteer work and did the things I always wanted to do while I suddenly had the time to do them. If you like travelling, travel while you still have the time. But don't stay idle for too long. If you enjoy studying, a Master's Degree isn't a bad idea. Though I'm not sure if the marginal benefit of getting a master's is large in IT. Many of my friends are taking their master's right now, leading to PhD but it's Economics so I'm not sure about IT.
18912 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
46 / F / Reston, VA, USA
Offline
Posted 7/19/16
I thought that getting my Masters in Computer Systems Management would open up a lot of jobs that I was unable to access with my Bachelors in English. It turned out that unless I lived in a big city - that assumption was wrong. In fact, I found it HARDER to find work in smaller towns because everywhere I applied told me I was "overqualified" for the entry level positions but the upper level positions they only promote people into who already work for the company.

My suggestion is to accept even a volunteer or minimum wage job, it provides a certain amount of structure to your days that isn't there when you aren't working. I've also discovered that it is a lot easier to find work if you already have a job because it provides current references about whether or not you're reliable, show up every day on time and that kind of stuff. Plus it can give you pocket change that can be used to improve your interview outfit, etc. Now obviously it helps if there is even a remote connection between the gap filler job and what you really WANT to do and are trained to do. Like maybe you could teach at ITT Technical Institute or work in the computer lab at a local college.

Your best bet is to reach out to all your friends, family and anyone else you know and start asking if they've heard of any jobs you might be capable of. Networking among friends got me more interviews more rapidly than other methods. Due to my ex-husband's job we moved multiple times to various states across the USA and every time I had to start job searching from ground zero because I didn't know anyone in town, or much about what jobs might even be available in the town.

Be sure to clean up your online presence. A lot of employers look at your social media these days. Also, they will check your credit report because it can be an indicator of whether or not you're likely to steal from them. So make sure you check that there are no bad reports on there.

11813 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
47 / M / Auburn, Washington
Offline
Posted 7/19/16

DubiousBro wrote:
I've been unemployed for about a month and have been looking for more jobs, but it seems very difficult to get one that isn't just a minimum wage job, especially when I have a good amount of money saved up.


Advice number one: reduce your expenses as much as possible so the money will last longer.

Advice number two: start investing some serious thought and self-reflection in what kind of job you REALLY want.

Advice number three: continue seeking employment that you really want. Don't apply for any job that doesn't pay enough or that you don't want to do. As you make progress on #2, stop applying for jobs you only just realised you don't want.

I mean, this is kind of obvious, but nobody ever says it out loud: if you apply for jobs you don't want, you might get one. If you apply for jobs that don't pay enough, you might get one. That's how people get jobs they don't want that don't pay enough and then go around complaining that they have a college degree but have to work at this terrible job.

Nobody MADE them take it. When someone offers you a job you don't want that doesn't pay enough, say no. And as a matter of courtesy, if nothing else, don't go around asking for one.



I'm terrible at this adulting thing, and it's laughable that i'd go to an anime forum to ask for opinions, but I really do not know what to do at this point.


We're ALL terrible at this adulting thing. Even when you know how to do it, and I actually coach people on the subject, that doesn't mean you'll do what you know damn well needs to be done. Depression is pretty counterproductive on that, too.

I don't know why you watch anime when you're depressed, but I know why I do: because I don't have the life I want, and watching someone else live a life I would like better makes me slightly less miserable.

I don't have the luxury of hanging out with friends and going places, because I live in the middle of nowhere and have no transportation, plus every friend I have lives at least two hours drive away. It's not like I can call someone and say "hey, let's hang out" when that means a four hour round trip.

When I watch slice-of-life anime where friends actually hang out in the same place and do stuff, I can take some vicarious pleasure in that for about half an hour, but then I have to turn around and realise I still live in a shitty basement apartment with no car.

Trouble is, watching the anime doesn't get me ANY closer to fixing the problem. I know this. But it's just so much easier than trying to generate the several thousand dollars I need to pay off my traffic tickets, reinstate my licence, buy a car, and get insurance. That's an overwhelming problem that I can't solve right now.

It's not that I don't have the tools, either. I'm a performance and success coach. Isn't that funny? I teach people to have better performance and be more successful, but I'm not exactly living the life of Riley here. I was, not all that long ago, because when you charge people $500 to talk to you on the phone for an hour... you don't have to do a lot of work.

But I'm currently having a crisis of conscience. See, almost all of those calls amount to someone saying "I know what to do, but I don't want to do it" and then I say "do it anyway." There's a lot of happy horseshit packed around it so they feel good about it and think something brilliant happened, but it really is that simple: people know what to do, they just don't want to. And for some reason, "it's the right thing" isn't good enough. They need someone to TELL them to do it. It's like a mental illness or something.

Which is all well and good. I'm fine with taking someone's money and doing an easy job. But the repeat calls are bugging me. People will come back and pay me another $500 to talk for another hour, and they say "hey, that thing you told me to do... I didn't do it, and things got worse." And then I have to pack a bunch of happy horseshit around "GO DO IT" for an hour.

Maybe a third of the people who talk to me even TRY to do what I told them, which they already knew they needed to do. And maybe a third of THOSE actually finish doing it. That's like, just over ten percent. I don't like that number. Do I just suck at this or something? Why do people who know what to do and pay me $500 to tell them to do it... not do it? Do they just like throwing away $500? Is that their idea of fun?

I have trouble believing that. Some part of me is insisting that I could do a better job and get more people to do what they already know they ought to be doing. But I don't know how.

Of course, the obvious solution to this is just to not care. Take the money and give the advice and if they keep calling back with the same problem then just keep taking the money and giving the same advice.

I did that, for a while, and then I got a series of calls from a guy who had started a charity. He knew what to do and didn't want to do it. He called me six times, not wanting to do it, and then not doing it. Then his charity went bankrupt. I did a little digging and found that not long after he called me the first time, he lost his house and his wife left him and his life basically fell apart. Because he was sinking all of his money into the charity. Which ultimately went bankrupt. Because he wouldn't do what he knew he needed to do.

And I'm sitting there with $3,000 of this guy's money after he went bankrupt. If he was some rich arsehole playing at being a business owner, I wouldn't care, but this was a regular blue-collar guy who started a charity for kids. If anyone deserved to succeed, it was him. He didn't deserve to lose everything and go bankrupt. And if he'd just taken my damn advice, he wouldn't have.

But did I do everything I could?

Did I fuck up, somehow?

I tried my best. Or at least, I think I did. Did I? My brain keeps running back over everything. Yeah, he should have done what I told him. Why didn't he? Was there something I didn't know? Something I maybe SHOULD have known?

Is this my fault?

Almost a year later, I'm sitting here watching anime and playing video games and the money is running out with no income to replenish it.

But I've taken advice #1 from that initial list, reducing all my expenses, and it won't run out completely for another year or three. I'm hoping I'll be done with #2 long before then.

Now, #3 is a weird one for me, because I work for myself - "seeking employment that you really want," in my case, is just putting a pitch for what I want to do in front of people who need it done and are willing to pay for it. (Which is why I can comfortably and confidently take a few years off without worrying about the gap in my resume.)

So once I know the answer to #2, I just have to whack record on my video camera and tell people what I do and how much it costs. I've been doing that for years and I'm really good at it, so my only real blockage is the part where I figure out what I really want.

Now, what's the point of all that? Why did I even tell you all this?

Because I'm twice your age and I still don't have it all figured out. I'm terrible at adulting, too, but most other people are worse. The key is to try. Don't give up and stop even trying to adult. Keep doing it. You'll get better.

Most people's greatest failure is that because they can only do a little, they do nothing. But the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. Take it. Then take another. Keep taking steps, and you'll get there.

Stop, and you'll get nowhere. It's all well and good to watch some anime and take care of your mental state by alleviating your misery here and there. But keep sending out resumes. Keep thinking about where you want to send them. And keep refining the process, so you don't end up with a job you don't want that doesn't pay enough.

Maybe give some thought to whether you want a job at all. I mean, I'm biased, because I've spent more than half my adult life working for myself... and it's worked out at least as well as my friends with jobs. Sometimes I have no work and make no money, but it's usually because I decided to take a break, and when I do have work and make money it's generally less work and more money than my employed friends.
2432 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / M / KY
Offline
Posted 7/19/16

cdarklock wrote:


DubiousBro wrote:
I've been unemployed for about a month and have been looking for more jobs, but it seems very difficult to get one that isn't just a minimum wage job, especially when I have a good amount of money saved up.


Advice number one: reduce your expenses as much as possible so the money will last longer.

Advice number two: start investing some serious thought and self-reflection in what kind of job you REALLY want.

Advice number three: continue seeking employment that you really want. Don't apply for any job that doesn't pay enough or that you don't want to do. As you make progress on #2, stop applying for jobs you only just realised you don't want.

I mean, this is kind of obvious, but nobody ever says it out loud: if you apply for jobs you don't want, you might get one. If you apply for jobs that don't pay enough, you might get one. That's how people get jobs they don't want that don't pay enough and then go around complaining that they have a college degree but have to work at this terrible job.

Nobody MADE them take it. When someone offers you a job you don't want that doesn't pay enough, say no. And as a matter of courtesy, if nothing else, don't go around asking for one.



I'm terrible at this adulting thing, and it's laughable that i'd go to an anime forum to ask for opinions, but I really do not know what to do at this point.


We're ALL terrible at this adulting thing. Even when you know how to do it, and I actually coach people on the subject, that doesn't mean you'll do what you know damn well needs to be done. Depression is pretty counterproductive on that, too.

I don't know why you watch anime when you're depressed, but I know why I do: because I don't have the life I want, and watching someone else live a life I would like better makes me slightly less miserable.

I don't have the luxury of hanging out with friends and going places, because I live in the middle of nowhere and have no transportation, plus every friend I have lives at least two hours drive away. It's not like I can call someone and say "hey, let's hang out" when that means a four hour round trip.

When I watch slice-of-life anime where friends actually hang out in the same place and do stuff, I can take some vicarious pleasure in that for about half an hour, but then I have to turn around and realise I still live in a shitty basement apartment with no car.

Trouble is, watching the anime doesn't get me ANY closer to fixing the problem. I know this. But it's just so much easier than trying to generate the several thousand dollars I need to pay off my traffic tickets, reinstate my licence, buy a car, and get insurance. That's an overwhelming problem that I can't solve right now.

It's not that I don't have the tools, either. I'm a performance and success coach. Isn't that funny? I teach people to have better performance and be more successful, but I'm not exactly living the life of Riley here. I was, not all that long ago, because when you charge people $500 to talk to you on the phone for an hour... you don't have to do a lot of work.

But I'm currently having a crisis of conscience. See, almost all of those calls amount to someone saying "I know what to do, but I don't want to do it" and then I say "do it anyway." There's a lot of happy horseshit packed around it so they feel good about it and think something brilliant happened, but it really is that simple: people know what to do, they just don't want to. And for some reason, "it's the right thing" isn't good enough. They need someone to TELL them to do it. It's like a mental illness or something.

Which is all well and good. I'm fine with taking someone's money and doing an easy job. But the repeat calls are bugging me. People will come back and pay me another $500 to talk for another hour, and they say "hey, that thing you told me to do... I didn't do it, and things got worse." And then I have to pack a bunch of happy horseshit around "GO DO IT" for an hour.

Maybe a third of the people who talk to me even TRY to do what I told them, which they already knew they needed to do. And maybe a third of THOSE actually finish doing it. That's like, just over ten percent. I don't like that number. Do I just suck at this or something? Why do people who know what to do and pay me $500 to tell them to do it... not do it? Do they just like throwing away $500? Is that their idea of fun?

I have trouble believing that. Some part of me is insisting that I could do a better job and get more people to do what they already know they ought to be doing. But I don't know how.

Of course, the obvious solution to this is just to not care. Take the money and give the advice and if they keep calling back with the same problem then just keep taking the money and giving the same advice.

I did that, for a while, and then I got a series of calls from a guy who had started a charity. He knew what to do and didn't want to do it. He called me six times, not wanting to do it, and then not doing it. Then his charity went bankrupt. I did a little digging and found that not long after he called me the first time, he lost his house and his wife left him and his life basically fell apart. Because he was sinking all of his money into the charity. Which ultimately went bankrupt. Because he wouldn't do what he knew he needed to do.

And I'm sitting there with $3,000 of this guy's money after he went bankrupt. If he was some rich arsehole playing at being a business owner, I wouldn't care, but this was a regular blue-collar guy who started a charity for kids. If anyone deserved to succeed, it was him. He didn't deserve to lose everything and go bankrupt. And if he'd just taken my damn advice, he wouldn't have.

But did I do everything I could?

Did I fuck up, somehow?

I tried my best. Or at least, I think I did. Did I? My brain keeps running back over everything. Yeah, he should have done what I told him. Why didn't he? Was there something I didn't know? Something I maybe SHOULD have known?

Is this my fault?

Almost a year later, I'm sitting here watching anime and playing video games and the money is running out with no income to replenish it.

But I've taken advice #1 from that initial list, reducing all my expenses, and it won't run out completely for another year or three. I'm hoping I'll be done with #2 long before then.

Now, #3 is a weird one for me, because I work for myself - "seeking employment that you really want," in my case, is just putting a pitch for what I want to do in front of people who need it done and are willing to pay for it. (Which is why I can comfortably and confidently take a few years off without worrying about the gap in my resume.)

So once I know the answer to #2, I just have to whack record on my video camera and tell people what I do and how much it costs. I've been doing that for years and I'm really good at it, so my only real blockage is the part where I figure out what I really want.

Now, what's the point of all that? Why did I even tell you all this?

Because I'm twice your age and I still don't have it all figured out. I'm terrible at adulting, too, but most other people are worse. The key is to try. Don't give up and stop even trying to adult. Keep doing it. You'll get better.

Most people's greatest failure is that because they can only do a little, they do nothing. But the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. Take it. Then take another. Keep taking steps, and you'll get there.

Stop, and you'll get nowhere. It's all well and good to watch some anime and take care of your mental state by alleviating your misery here and there. But keep sending out resumes. Keep thinking about where you want to send them. And keep refining the process, so you don't end up with a job you don't want that doesn't pay enough.

Maybe give some thought to whether you want a job at all. I mean, I'm biased, because I've spent more than half my adult life working for myself... and it's worked out at least as well as my friends with jobs. Sometimes I have no work and make no money, but it's usually because I decided to take a break, and when I do have work and make money it's generally less work and more money than my employed friends.




Lots of good advice here. From you, and from the others above. For starters, I will say that teaching yourself a new programming language or software system (ESRI, ERDAS, Smallworld, Microstation, etc...) is great, but most employers these days want verified experience (being paid...) using those systems. I've dealt with that issue in the past.

Ideally, I would like a job, yes. I have not had a vacation in a very long time, and ended up using the PTO from my last job for an extra paycheck rather than take a trip somewhere. My ideal job would be working for a city government. Very good benefits, stable, usually great pay. However, I find myself being turned down for these jobs, so all of my work has been in private corporations or companies.

In this case, I am not sure what I need to do. You say that most people know, but they choose not to do. I've been applying to city jobs all over the country the past month, continuing to do so. I am in a somewhat stable situation for the moment, and have enough money to last me through the end of September.. at least. Thankfully I didn't buy a car like I had planned, or i'd probably be homeless at the moment.

I really appreciate everyone's responses here. You have restored my faith in humanity a little bit. I always was a great student, very good grades, and I see people I graduated with who got 2.6 GPA overall making $50-60K a year right out of the gates and not having these kinds of issues. It's so weird to me. There's a lot that doesn't make sense in life, i've discovered.

I am limited in minimum wage jobs, because, i'll be honest... I lack the skills to work fast food. I have poor manual dexterity, and do not multi-task extremely well. I could probably pull off retail or waiting tables.... maybe..

For now i'm just waiting on applications and responses. 26 applications sent out so far, 3 no's at the moment. If I do not find something good by September, I will probably go back to school. I mainly watch anime when I am depressed because it is an escape mechanism to me. It takes my mind off of myself and onto something else, much like a book or video game would. I've been using my downtime to hang out with friends I have not seen in years, have been having a great time lately, until I get my bills and then I get worried again. Hopefully this will all work itself out, but taking a job that isn't in your field, actually hurts your chances at getting a job in your field in the future... from what I have heard.

Thanks again for all of the posts and replies. Much appreciated. Another reason why I love CR.
11813 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
47 / M / Auburn, Washington
Offline
Posted 7/20/16

DubiousBro wrote:

26 applications sent out so far


Well, THERE'S your problem. ;)

It has always taken me two to three hundred resumes and four to six interviews to get a job offer. Basically, about 2% of my resumes produced an interview, and about 20% of those interviews produced an offer. I have also found that my prospects are dramatically improved if I receive multiple job offers in a short enough time frame that I can play them off one another. I like to get at least three.

That's about a thousand resumes. If I send out fifty a day, I can do that in a month (taking weekends off), and then it's relatively easy to schedule all my initial interviews - 15 or so - in the same week. Almost everyone will give you a week or two to consider the offer, so I usually end up with three or four job offers to toss back and forth until someone offers me what I want.

Now, realistically, most people I know only send out a couple hundred. They take about four months to do it, usually getting an interview each month. And they take the first offer they get. That's not too far off from what you're doing, but their results aren't that great. And it matches what I see myself: send out fifty resumes, get one interview, five interviews will get you an offer.

Statistically, this looks like what the employment department in my state expects, too: unemployment insurance lasts six months, and during that six months you are expected to make three employment contacts per workday or 15 per week. That's a total of 390 contacts, which will give a conscientious and honest applicant roughly a 90% certainty of landing a job - and about half of them will land one in three months.

Now, it stands to reason that if you want to get more offers, you have to do more interviews - and if you want to get more interviews, you have to send out more resumes. A lot of people will say "just write better resumes," or "just do better interviews," but think about that for a moment.

Don't you already write the best resumes AND do the best interviews that you can?

Chances are good that you CAN'T do better. So in the absence of better, do more. You already know how to send a resume. Just do more of it. More is almost always easier than better.

Don't get me wrong, ANYTHING IS BETTER THAN NOTHING. If you are too depressed and unmotivated to send out fifty resumes, or ten, or even one, THAT IS OKAY. Do what you can do. It is not "this or nothing." It is "as close to this as you can get." More, if you can manage - if you're motivated enough to send out three hundred resumes in a single day, hell, GO FOR IT. Can't hurt, right?

And if you're at all normal, you are currently wondering why they didn't teach you this in school. I wondered that, too.
First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.