Post Reply What does wild boar taste like
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53 / M
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Posted 7/22/16 , edited 7/22/16
Is is like domesticated pork?

Just curious
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29 / M / Washington State
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Posted 7/22/16
Can't help ya there are no wild boar in WA state
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24 / F / Johnstown, PA, USA
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Posted 7/23/16 , edited 7/23/16
A gamey version of domesticated hogs, pretty much. Like deer and elk, the meat is leaner than domesticated animals', and you can sometimes detect a "grassy" taste. It more easily becomes dry and tough when cooked, because of a low fat content and tighter muscle grain. Visually, it's darker than domesticated pork, too. Some think it tastes a bit beefy.
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36 / M / Alberta, Canada
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Posted 7/23/16
I'd describe it as a bit of a 'double down' on it's 'porkness'. It's not going to disappear as little rando meat chunks in a stir fry or something like that. Far easier to get boar to stand alone on a plate. As mentioned it does need to be prepped a little differently because it's leaner and occasionally tougher. Slow cooked over a long time works well. Boar round in slow cooker with enchilada sauce for 4 hours (6-8?) pull it apart with a fork, fire it into taco/burrito/bun/hands/face. It'll be tasty like standard pork would, but stand out more rather than ending up tomato flavored meat textured filling. Boar will concentrate more into a strong umami flavor as well, make a richer stock/demi. You'll need to be more careful how to develop the product so you end up with rich over funky.
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Posted 7/23/16
Agreed with the above - it's a powerful flavor, so slow cooking is really the best way of dealing with it. A friend recently gave me quite a bit of boar, which had been hunted, and I'm told that can increase the flavor "punch" even more if it was running when killed. Not sure how true that is, but when I tried fixing some, it needed a lot of stuff to mild it down. Kind of like.. imagine cured ham. Compress a cured ham quantity of flavor into a small pork chop. Have been able to get it quite tender with a crock pot, or foil wrapped in the oven on low heat for a few hours.

(I have some in the slow cooker right now, in fact, for several hundred servings of loaded mashed potatoes)
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