Post Reply Chinese Pun Police
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Hoosierville
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Posted 7/31/16
Watch your puns or the Chinese pun police will PUNish you and imPUNson you


China bans wordplay in attempt at pun control
Officials say casual alteration of idioms risks nothing less than ‘cultural and linguistic chaos’, despite their common usage

From online discussions to adverts, Chinese culture is full of puns. But the country’s print and broadcast watchdog has ruled that there is nothing funny about them.

It has banned wordplay on the grounds that it breaches the law on standard spoken and written Chinese, makes promoting cultural heritage harder and may mislead the public – especially children.

The casual alteration of idioms risks nothing less than “cultural and linguistic chaos”, it warns.

Chinese is perfectly suited to puns because it has so many homophones. Popular sayings and even customs, as well as jokes, rely on wordplay.

But the order from the State Administration for Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television says: “Radio and television authorities at all levels must tighten up their regulations and crack down on the irregular and inaccurate use of the Chinese language, especially the misuse of idioms.”

Programmes and adverts should strictly comply with the standard spelling and use of characters, words, phrases and idioms – and avoid changing the characters, phrasing and meanings, the order said.

“Idioms are one of the great features of the Chinese language and contain profound cultural heritage and historical resources and great aesthetic, ideological and moral values,” it added.

“That’s the most ridiculous part of this: [wordplay] is so much part and parcel of Chinese heritage,” said David Moser, academic director for CET Chinese studies at Beijing Capital Normal University.

When couples marry, people will give them dates and peanuts – a reference to the wish Zaosheng guizi or “May you soon give birth to a son”. The word for dates is also zao and peanuts are huasheng.

The notice cites complaints from viewers, but the examples it gives appear utterly innocuous. In a tourism promotion campaign, tweaking the characters used in the phrase jin shan jin mei – perfection – has turned it into a slogan translated as “Shanxi, a land of splendours”. In another case, replacing a single character in ke bu rong huan has turned “brook no delay” into “coughing must not linger” for a medicine advert.

“It could just be a small group of people, or even one person, who are conservative, humourless, priggish and arbitrarily purist, so that everyone has to fall in line,” said Moser.

“But I wonder if this is not a preemptive move, an excuse to crack down for supposed ‘linguistic purity reasons’ on the cute language people use to crack jokes about the leadership or policies. It sounds too convenient.”

Internet users have been particularly inventive in finding alternative ways to discuss subjects or people whose names have been blocked by censors.

Moves to block such creativity have a long history too. Moser said Yuan Shikai, president of the Republic of China from 1912 to 1915, reportedly wanted to rename the Lantern Festival, Yuan Xiao Jie, because it sounded like “cancel Yuan day”.




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Posted 7/31/16
That's actually pretty old news at this point, and it's really just one small part of a far larger campaign the PRC's government has been waging to control the flow of information for decades. Banning representations of homosexuality, punishing people for making jokes about or speaking ill of Mao, trying to limit and control puns, censoring foreign streams under the guise of protecting people from explicit sexual content, preventing people from gathering to mourn or protest the incident at Tiananmen Square (that's actually a very old policy), blocking news feeds about the democratic protests in Hong Kong, they do this kind of thing all the time. If there is one thing the ruling party in China is aware of to a borderline obsessive degree it's just how often governments in China have been overthrown in popular uprisings, and they are visibly terrified that they're next on the chopping block.
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26 / M
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Posted 7/31/16
Oh, China.
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19 / M / east coast. Let t...
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Posted 7/31/16 , edited 7/31/16
Comm on guys. Give us a break.
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20 / Cold and High
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Posted 7/31/16
what a great pun.
Kina
how come you so yellow?
Blue and yellow?
Thats sweden for you!
but.. but all I ever wanted was to see you smiling!

Basshunter - All I Ever Wanted
https://youtu.be/F-CwAE1TCyA
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Posted 7/31/16 , edited 7/31/16
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Hoosierville
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Posted 7/31/16
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20 / M / Imoutoland!
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Posted 7/31/16
OH GOD NO! HOW WILL I SURVIVE?!
qwueri 
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Posted 8/1/16 , edited 8/1/16
No pun allowed.
Banned
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25 / M / Norway
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Posted 8/1/16
Dont really know about this
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