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Post Reply what are your thoughts on prepping?
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Posted 9/2/16
do any of you do it?
and im not talking about like the people on that doomsday show
but just storing a month worth or more of food and water in case of an emergency, whatever it may be

maybe a weapon or two or whatever
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Posted 9/2/16 , edited 9/2/16
That's an excellent plan.

Maintaining a buffer of essentials will pay off. It isn't a matter of if, but when. Knowing that you're not going to starve or dehydrate takes the pressure off of a sudden loss of income, or even housing.
qwueri 
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Posted 9/2/16
It's a good idea if you have the storage space. Never hurts to be prepared for disasters.
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Posted 9/2/16

gornotck wrote:

That's an excellent plan.

Maintaining a buffer of essentials will pay off. It isn't a matter of if, but when. Knowing that you're not going to starve or dehydrate takes the pressure off of a sudden loss of income, or even housing.


my grandparents are the kind of people who say "the government will take care of us" "we can just go to wal mart" when hurricane issabelle hit, and my mother and I were stuck at their house because all the trees and power lines were down on that private road and we couldn't get out, the mayor had to come and help
needless to say, because of being Mormon and being taught how to prep, we had food, if we didn't bring our supplies over we wouldn't have had food, because my grandparents let things expire , -they have shit in their house that is 5 years old, and still eat it
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Posted 9/2/16 , edited 9/2/16
If I had the time and space, I'd probably be closer to the 'doomsday' preparation end. When it comes to weapons, you need some way to maintain them. I think having a blacksmith shop, a machining shop, and a wood shop would pay dividends towards being prepared for the worst.

Indoor hydroponics farms interest me, as do these pebble bed modular nuclear reactors I've heard so much about.


redokami wrote:


gornotck wrote:

That's an excellent plan.

Maintaining a buffer of essentials will pay off. It isn't a matter of if, but when. Knowing that you're not going to starve or dehydrate takes the pressure off of a sudden loss of income, or even housing.


my grandparents are the kind of people who say "the government will take care of us" "we can just go to wal mart" when hurricane issabelle hit, and my mother and I were stuck at their house because all the trees and power lines were down on that private road and we couldn't get out, the mayor had to come and help
needless to say, because of being Mormon and being taught how to prep, we had food, if we didn't bring our supplies over we wouldn't have had food, because my grandparents let things expire , -they have shit in their house that is 5 years old, and still eat it


Not as crazy as it seems, because you can get some massive preservation from canning, jarring, and maintaining proper temperature control. Granted, after awhile I hear it has a terrible texture.

My grandparents... don't expect the government to take care of them. My grandmother was raised by her grandmother who maintained both a garden and livestock, produced an excess, and still kept a rotating store of preserved foods. She has a refrigerator sized freezer of prepared foods, as well as a refrigerator/freezer of daily foods. Probably has a pantry of canned foods beyond the pantry of dry goods I know about, but she might have backed off on that.
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Posted 9/2/16
I've been through a number of situations where I was glad that I had supplies for more than a few days on hand. Probably the one most of you would recognize was when I survived Hurricane Katrina. The hurricane itself was bad, but it was the aftermath that was really awful. There were so many trees down across roads and whatnot that no supplies could get shipped in. There were a lot of people in my town who had evacuated from further south so we had more than the average number of people in town - and that's not counting every hotel being full of the electric company guys who'd been stationed there to head into what was supposed to have been the storm zone.

Basically with so many trees down, nobody was going anywhere until the trees were cleared. The gas was being used up rapidly in people's chainsaws and generators. Everyone was using generators because the falling trees took the power lines out. The electric company guys couldn't go anywhere till the trees were out of the roads. The gas ran out and the only people going anywhere were farmers who had their own diesel fuel stored at their farms. The electric company guys got power working in our town but couldn't get out because the roads were still closed, the roads couldn't be cleared because there was no gas, gas couldn't be shipped in because the roads were closed...it was a cycle feeding on itself.

Anyway, I don't necessarily advocate keeping a ridiculous amount of supplies. Just what the CDC recommends in case of emergencies. Enjoy the CDC's Zombie Apocalypse page: http://www.cdc.gov/phpr/zombies.htm
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Posted 9/2/16

gornotck wrote:

If I had the time and space, I'd probably be closer to the 'doomsday' preparation end. When it comes to weapons, you need some way to maintain them. I think having a blacksmith shop, a machining shop, and a wood shop would pay dividends towards being prepared for the worst.

Indoor hydroponics farms interest me, as do these pebble bed modular nuclear reactors I've heard so much about.


redokami wrote:


gornotck wrote:

That's an excellent plan.

Maintaining a buffer of essentials will pay off. It isn't a matter of if, but when. Knowing that you're not going to starve or dehydrate takes the pressure off of a sudden loss of income, or even housing.


my grandparents are the kind of people who say "the government will take care of us" "we can just go to wal mart" when hurricane issabelle hit, and my mother and I were stuck at their house because all the trees and power lines were down on that private road and we couldn't get out, the mayor had to come and help
needless to say, because of being Mormon and being taught how to prep, we had food, if we didn't bring our supplies over we wouldn't have had food, because my grandparents let things expire , -they have shit in their house that is 5 years old, and still eat it


Not as crazy as it seems, because you can get some massive preservation from canning, jarring, and maintaining proper temperature control. Granted, after awhile I hear it has a terrible texture.

My grandparents... don't expect the government to take care of them. My grandmother was raised by her grandmother who maintained both a garden and livestock, produced an excess, and still kept a rotating store of preserved foods. She has a refrigerator sized freezer of prepared foods, as well as a refrigerator/freezer of daily foods. Probably has a pantry of canned foods beyond the pantry of dry goods I know about, but she might have backed off on that.


so obviously you have experience with this, needless to say I live in an apartment, do you have any ideas on how I can make the most with my storage space? and what weapons I don't want a gun, I have pepper spray and a knife
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Posted 9/2/16 , edited 9/2/16
Storing food frozen can help so long its sealed in it can be good for a while or canned, depends on what and longer it stays it can be more toxic as the cans aren't exactly "clean".

prepper spray can be good and bad so long nobody gets blinded for "no reason", as it might be easier to use against someone.
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Posted 9/2/16 , edited 9/2/16

GooseMcDucks wrote:

Storing food frozen can help so long its sealed in it can be good for a while or canned, depends on what and longer it stays it can be more toxic as the cans aren't exactly "clean".

prepper spray can be good and bad so long nobody gets blinded for "no reason", as it might be easier to use against someone.


I would never carry pepper spray without a kinetic weapon (gun, cudgel, bladed weapon or the like) to go to if/ when it fails. Pepper spray is all well and good for controlling unruly drunks, but it's really not *that* effective. It is painful, but does nothing to physically stop an assailant from continuing an attack- it relies almost completely on pain compliance. If you have someone that *really* wants to do you harm, it's just going to piss them off. Also, some people are naturally more-or-less immune to it (though I don't know of anyone naturally fully immune the way some are to CS tear gas, where it just doesn't affect them at *all*).

I don't know I'd call any of this "prepping", though. It's just common sense to keep a week or two of food, water, and basic medical supplies around the house. Keeping at least a first aid kit, blanket, raincoat, and couple gallons of water in the car is a good idea too, in case you break down or are otherwise stranded for an extended period.

I don't think it counts as "prepping" until you start talking about gas masks and fallout shelters and multiple months of supplies. It's a loaded term.

Oh, and the term "canning" generally is accepted to also include preserving through hot-sealing of goods in glass jars, too. No worries of leaching metals into the food like with cans then.
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Posted 9/2/16

redokami wrote:

so obviously you have experience with this, needless to say I live in an apartment, do you have any ideas on how I can make the most with my storage space? and what weapons I don't want a gun, I have pepper spray and a knife


I have less experience than it seems, but.. I looked at that CDC site, and they actually have a fairly decent list. Searching the internet turns up various disaster preparation plans, too.

But, let's just guess.

Let's just assume that you have the space for one month (30 days) of emergency supplies. A lot can happen in a month, but usually disasters either don't last that long or you get out of Dodge before then. We will also assume that you're alone.

You will need about 30 gallons of water to drink. That takes up a ton of space, so milk crates are you friend there. Milk crate holds 6 gallons, so that's 5 crates of water.
You will need about 30 days of food, in a mixture of cans, dry goods, and jars. Assuming cans, I think a milk crate holds about... 60ish cans, depending on size? Let's call it two milk crates of stew, soup, or the similar.
You'd of course need to keep a supply of whatever medicines you need to take, painkillers, antibiotics, bandages, sterile gauze, and other first aid supplies. Let's assume one milk crate.

Now, personally, I'd probably keep camping supplies. A camp stove, and enough propane/kerosene to keep it going for a month of heavy use. Camping lanterns, and even more propane/kerosene. Batteries of all sizes.

Pepper spray will incapacitate you, and may not be entirely effective against an opponent. You blow that stuff indoors, and you won't be able to live in that room for a month or more.

A taser may or may not work. I've heard mixed reports. Plus, you have to be fairly close to use them. And they require batteries.

A good knife is always good to have, as it's a useful tool. I understand it generally doesn't intimidate an attacker, though, and requires a relatively high level of skill to use effectively. Plus you have to be fairly close.
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Posted 9/2/16
I consider storing food for a week or so to be just part of the normal things most people do in life.

I haven't got a chest freezer or the room in my kitchen for one so I use the freezer part of my fridge and that's enough for me.

I did grow up with grandparents who always had water stored and non mains lighting because in the Caribbean water and electricity can get cut without any prior warning day or night. This happened less and less as the years went by but everyone always prepares for that. Even though shops are open more often most of my grandparents generation and even my mother's generation are used to cooking from scratch. They're aware of the possibility of shops not being able to stay open in a crisis or there being a problem with goods getting restocked. I've never had to make it but I do know how to make coconut oil. I can make my own clothing if I wish. I bake my own bread at holiday times because that is the tradition I grew up with. It's true that now it's getting more and more reliant on exports and expecting that things will always be convenient but the older generations are still there to let us know that it helps to be prepared.
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Posted 9/2/16

gornotck wrote:


redokami wrote:

so obviously you have experience with this, needless to say I live in an apartment, do you have any ideas on how I can make the most with my storage space? and what weapons I don't want a gun, I have pepper spray and a knife


I have less experience than it seems, but.. I looked at that CDC site, and they actually have a fairly decent list. Searching the internet turns up various disaster preparation plans, too.

But, let's just guess.

Let's just assume that you have the space for one month (30 days) of emergency supplies. A lot can happen in a month, but usually disasters either don't last that long or you get out of Dodge before then. We will also assume that you're alone.

You will need about 30 gallons of water to drink. That takes up a ton of space, so milk crates are you friend there. Milk crate holds 6 gallons, so that's 5 crates of water.
You will need about 30 days of food, in a mixture of cans, dry goods, and jars. Assuming cans, I think a milk crate holds about... 60ish cans, depending on size? Let's call it two milk crates of stew, soup, or the similar.
You'd of course need to keep a supply of whatever medicines you need to take, painkillers, antibiotics, bandages, sterile gauze, and other first aid supplies. Let's assume one milk crate.

Now, personally, I'd probably keep camping supplies. A camp stove, and enough propane/kerosene to keep it going for a month of heavy use. Camping lanterns, and even more propane/kerosene. Batteries of all sizes.

Pepper spray will incapacitate you, and may not be entirely effective against an opponent. You blow that stuff indoors, and you won't be able to live in that room for a month or more.

A taser may or may not work. I've heard mixed reports. Plus, you have to be fairly close to use them. And they require batteries.

A good knife is always good to have, as it's a useful tool. I understand it generally doesn't intimidate an attacker, though, and requires a relatively high level of skill to use effectively. Plus you have to be fairly close.

ok so I have been storing water in cleaned out 2 liter bottles PETE , without bleach because I don't trust that shit,is that ok
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Posted 9/2/16

gornotck wrote:


redokami wrote:

so obviously you have experience with this, needless to say I live in an apartment, do you have any ideas on how I can make the most with my storage space? and what weapons I don't want a gun, I have pepper spray and a knife


I have less experience than it seems, but.. I looked at that CDC site, and they actually have a fairly decent list. Searching the internet turns up various disaster preparation plans, too.

But, let's just guess.

Let's just assume that you have the space for one month (30 days) of emergency supplies. A lot can happen in a month, but usually disasters either don't last that long or you get out of Dodge before then. We will also assume that you're alone.

You will need about 30 gallons of water to drink. That takes up a ton of space, so milk crates are you friend there. Milk crate holds 6 gallons, so that's 5 crates of water.
You will need about 30 days of food, in a mixture of cans, dry goods, and jars. Assuming cans, I think a milk crate holds about... 60ish cans, depending on size? Let's call it two milk crates of stew, soup, or the similar.
You'd of course need to keep a supply of whatever medicines you need to take, painkillers, antibiotics, bandages, sterile gauze, and other first aid supplies. Let's assume one milk crate.

Now, personally, I'd probably keep camping supplies. A camp stove, and enough propane/kerosene to keep it going for a month of heavy use. Camping lanterns, and even more propane/kerosene. Batteries of all sizes.

Pepper spray will incapacitate you, and may not be entirely effective against an opponent. You blow that stuff indoors, and you won't be able to live in that room for a month or more.

A taser may or may not work. I've heard mixed reports. Plus, you have to be fairly close to use them. And they require batteries.

A good knife is always good to have, as it's a useful tool. I understand it generally doesn't intimidate an attacker, though, and requires a relatively high level of skill to use effectively. Plus you have to be fairly close.


https://www.amazon.com/VIPERTEK-VTS-880-Rechargeable-Flashlight-Black/dp/B01F4E2YI2/ref=sr_1_2?s=hunting-fishing&ie=UTF8&qid=1472829883&sr=1-2&keywords=tazer
so like this, how long would you hold the button down? cuz I mean you don't want to kill em
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Posted 9/2/16 , edited 9/2/16

redokami wrote:

ok so I have been storing water in cleaned out 2 liter bottles PETE , without bleach because I don't trust that shit,is that ok


I honestly don't know. I've never tried that.

I understand that the bleach is to kill the bacteria left after cleaning, which can and will contaminate the water, but I've always been leery of bleach myself.

https://jvwcd.org/water/emergency
http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/water/drought/how-to-store-water-for-drinking-or-cooking
http://www.deq.utah.gov/Topics/emergencies/drinkingwater/emergencywaterstorage.htm

So I looked it up. It should be fine, according to one or more of those sites, as long as it's from a public water source.

As to the stun gun, here's a video of a guy stun gunning himself over like 20 minutes. According to the comments, he was eventually able to hold it against himself for 5 seconds without losing control.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0KMe1aa3Bk
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Beyond The Boundary
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Posted 9/2/16
Be prepared for any and everything to the best of your abilities and what society/law allows. Its better to have them and not need them than need them and not have the.
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