Post Reply How about completing animes ?
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Posted 9/10/16
With all that is- going on about licensing costs / CR - FUNI hear this ! Why is it we cant get the much needed Season 2 and or conclusions

Isnt it cheaper for the Studios / Prodution CMT's to give us this instead of the expensive start - ups.

The DVD sales are down because of over saturation of new anime every season that has 1 cour!
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Posted 9/10/16 , edited 9/10/16

FLjerry2011 wrote:
The DVD sales are down because of over saturation of new anime every season that has 1 cour!
Do you have the actual numbers to back up this statement?

Edit: and we already have a thread for complaining about anime not getting continuations http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-964767/good-bye-pump-and-dump-anime
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CKD-Anime wrote:


FLjerry2011 wrote:
The DVD sales are down because of over saturation of new anime every season that has 1 cour!
Do you have the actual numbers to back up this statement?

Edit: and we already have a thread for complaining about anime not getting continuations http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-964767/good-bye-pump-and-dump-anime


Well first I wiil talk about the part you avoided The Licensing costs and how close to the anime Bubble we are clise to

I wil let Justin / Choef of ANN explain it / it's not as clear as lot of you think . BTW I have been follwing all the changes that Justin others have been talking about It's funny because I nthink it was either in the SummervAnime or Site Nes Roolout but I called it it looks more like FUNI RoLL


Why Are Funimation And Crunchyroll Getting Married? by Justin Sevakis,

Anonymous asks:

The recent news that Crunchyroll and Funimation are partnering up sure seems like a really good thing for fans (we only have to subscribe to one service now, unless we want dubs). But why did it happen? Is consolidation like this a bad sign for the anime market?

I wouldn't call it a bad sign, but it's almost certainly a reaction to recent events in the business that have made life a lot harder for anime publishers.

Let's take account of what we already know: First, we know that license fees have been absolutely out of control for the last few years. Bidding wars between Funimation and Crunchyroll, as well as occasional violent disruption from Amazon, Hulu and Netflix have pushed the fees for some shows well over the US$200,000 per episode mark -- $2.6 Million for a 13-episode show. Sales, while healthy, have not gone up anywhere near that much, and this was clearly not sustainable for anime publishers.

Secondly, we know that Hulu was a very important revenue source for publishers like Funimation, Sentai Filmworks, Viz Media and others. For years, Hulu worked by simply hosting just about any anime, and sharing its ad revenue with the rights holders. However, over the course of the last year the company changed its business model almost entirely. A significant amount of the anime on the site was removed (the less popular ones, presumably), and the service went subscription-only. (Most of its free catalog is now available at the new Yahoo View site, which few people know about and doesn't appear to have been marketed at all.)

Instead of revenue sharing on nearly every series made available to them, Hulu now pays a set license fee for a select few shows. So while anime companies still do business with them, the revenues coming in from Hulu are nowhere near what they once were.

From that, it's not hard to figure out what happened. Licensing spending was out of control. Hulu's change in strategy cut into Funimation's revenue. With that in mind, working together seemed like a better idea than continuing to try and kneecap each other.

It is interesting that, in spite of years of fierce competition, both Funimation and Crunchyroll became companies that complement each other quite well. Crunchyroll is one of only a half dozen or so successful (and apparently profitable) streaming providers, and markets their service incredibly well. Funimation's dubbing department is the fastest and one of the best in the world, and they're extremely good at individually marketing titles and selling them on disc -- a segment of the market that's still growing. Both companies were trying to attain the abilities of the other: Crunchyroll had just announced plans to get into dubbing and disc sales, while Funimation's streaming service just relaunched in January. But neither one was really there yet.

Short-term, Japanese licensors will not be happy about this arrangement. They can no longer play one against the other, and can probably expect a significant drop-off in license fee prices -- hopefully down to more sane and healthy levels. I expect them to put more investment into Daisuki and possibly other alternative services and publishers, as it's not in their best interest to have only one single anime publisher in the US. The other anime publishers in the US may not immediately see the partnership as good news, but I'm sure some licensors will want to work with them more in order to prevent CrunchyMation (FuniRoll?) from having a total monopoly. While Hulu, Netflix and Amazon drop in every once in a while to bid a ludicrous amount on what they perceive to be a really big title, they are not interested in 90% of the shows being made, and can't be counted on.

It's also important to point out that this is a partnership, not a merger. The two companies are staying separately owned and controlled, and both will likely have different agendas going forward. This partnership may last for a decade, or it may last for a single season. But in the mean time, having nearly all of the anime in one place sure is a big win for the fans. (The ones in North America, anyway.)

https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/answerman/2016-09-09/.106251


Now I check the bpth the DVD / Blu-Ray sales each week . I am not going to qoute a whole summer worth .

Except for for a few Titles / Love Live / Girls and Panzer / Mr. Osomatsu Intial / ongoing sales are only in the 100's if that . B-Project / Zegaoain did well ! If you were yo check weekly I can understand the lack of completions for anime! Chart reflects true anime only



Japan's Animation Blu-ray Disc Ranking, August 29 - September 4 posted on 2016-09-06 04:30 EDT Love Live! μ's sells 6,993 more, followed by B-PROJECT, Zegapain box, Mr. Osomatsu, live-action Terra Formars


Rank Last
Week Title Weekly
Copies Total
Copies Release Date Maker
Artist/Category Highest
Rank Weeks
on Chart
1 1 Zootopia MovieNEX 37,553 217,262 16/8/24 WDS
Animation 1 2
2 - B-Project: Kodō Ambitious 1 (Limited Complete Pressing) 5,197 5,197 16/8/31 ANX
Animation 2 1
3 - Zegapain 10th Anniversary Box 4,338 4,338 16/8/31 BVS
Animation 3 1
4 2 Mr. Osomatsu 8th Matsu (Limited First Pressing Blu-ray Disc) 3,656 19,882 16/8/26 AVP
Animation 2 2
5 - TV Anime Ushio & Tora 1 Vol. 2 1,575 1,575 16/8/31 TJC
Animation 5 1
6 - Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon Crystal: Season III Blu-ray (Limited First Edition)3 1,308 1,308 16/8/31 K
Animation 6 1
7 13 The Good Dinosaur MovieNEX 1,141 35,896 16/7/6 WDS
Animation 2 9
8 4 Re:Zero 3 (Blu-ray) 1,086 8,204 16/8/24 SGT
Animation 4 2
9 5 Macross Delta 02 (Limited Special Edition) 950 7,883 16/8/26 BVS
Animation 5 2
10 - The Garden of Words Blu-ray (Bundled With Soundtrack CD) 808 24,431 13/6/21 CMW
Animation 5 65
11 7 Mobile Suit Gundam: Iron-Blooded Orphans 9 672 6,485 16/8/26 BVS
Animation 7 2
12 6 High School Fleet 3 (Limited Complete Pressing) 605 6,871 16/8/24 ANX
Animation 6 2
13 8 JoJo's Bizarre Adventure: Diamond Is Unbreakable Vol. 3 (First Edition) 561 6,292 16/8/24 WHV
Animation 8 2
14 - Tangled MovieNEX 519 96,284 14/7/16 WDS
Animation 4 112
15 15 Bungo Stray Dogs Blu-ray Limited Edition Vol. 3 492 2,059 16/8/26 KKA
Animation 15 2
16 - Girls und Panzer der Film (Limited Special Edition) 490 197,460 16/5/27 BVS
Animation 1 15
17 - Finding Nemo MovieNEX 481 12,915 16/4/20 WDS
Animation 7 20
18 - Kizumonogatari Part 1: Tekketsu (Limited Complete Pressing) 455 42,144 16/7/27 ANX
Animation 1 6
19 - Frozen MovieNEX 453 2,428,168 14/7/16 WDS
Animation 1 112
20 - Big Hero 6 MovieNEX 408 338,238 15/4/24 WDS

https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-09-06/japan-animation-blu-ray-disc-ranking-august-29-september-4/.106151




Japanese BD/DVD Sales Down 5.1% From 2014, Anime BD/DVD Sales Down 6.9% posted on 2016-03-21 03:00 EDT Japanese animation market sustains 2-year consecutive decline

The Japan Video Software Association released its annual sales figures for the overall Japanese DVD and Blu-ray Disc market last Wednesday, showing that overall DVD and Blu-ray Disc sales are down 5.1% in 2015, with total sales of 218.113 billion yen (about US$1.960 billion). By comparison, 2014 saw an overall decrease of 8.7% from 2013. The DVD and Blu-ray Disc market has been in annual decline for 11 straight years. As of 2015, the market has declined about 40% from its peak in 2004, when it was worth 375.3393 billion yen (about US$3.367 billion).

The overall Blu-ray Disc market saw a 1.9% increase from the previous year, with a net worth of 93.88 billion yen (about US$843.67 million), but the overall DVD market was worth 124.233 billion yen (about US$1.116 billion), a decrease of 9.8% from the year before. The consumer retail market sustained a 2.9% decrease, with a net worth of 162.650 billion yen (about US$1.461 billion), while rentals saw an 11.8% decline. The Anime! Anime! Biz site postulates that may be due to the increased popularity of streaming services.

The animation market, which combines both general and kids-oriented sales, as well as foreign general and kids-oriented sales and the rental market, reported total sales of 72.792 billion yen (about US$654.042 million) in 2015, down 14.9% from 85.858 billion yen (about US$771.341 million) the year previous, which Anime! Anime! Biz attributes to the impressive sales of Disney's Frozen in 2014.

The general Japanese animation market is down 6.9% from the previous year, with total sales of 49.082 billion yen (about US$440.948 million). The market has now sustained a two-year consecutive decline. The last time that the market garnered sales below 50 billion yen was in 2004, where the market earned 44.091 billion yen (about US$396.161 million).

Late-night anime made up about half of the market's total sales in 2015. Anime! Anime! Biz notes that though the number of anime produced has increased in recent years, and the market has grown, it has failed to turn around overall Japanese animation sales. Among Japanese anime sales, the Blu-ray Disc market suffered a 2.9% decrease in sales over the past year, and Anime! Anime! Biz postulates that this may herald the start of different purchasing habits for anime fans. It further notes that in recent years, anime has expanded to related markets, such as music, live concert events, and streaming, and that 2015's sales may reflect this.

https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-03-21/japanese-bd-dvd-sales-down-5.1-percent-from-2014-anime-bd-dvd-sales-down-6.9-percent/.100044


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Posted 9/10/16

FLjerry2011 wrote:

The DVD sales are down because of over saturation of new anime every season that has 1 cour!


I don't think that's right. This explanation, taken straight out of the article you posted as evidence, seems much more likely.


FLjerry2011 wrote:


Late-night anime made up about half of the market's total sales in 2015. Anime! Anime! Biz notes that though the number of anime produced has increased in recent years, and the market has grown, it has failed to turn around overall Japanese animation sales. Among Japanese anime sales, the Blu-ray Disc market suffered a 2.9% decrease in sales over the past year, and Anime! Anime! Biz postulates that this may herald the start of different purchasing habits for anime fans. It further notes that in recent years, anime has expanded to related markets, such as music, live concert events, and streaming, and that 2015's sales may reflect this.

https://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2016-03-21/japanese-bd-dvd-sales-down-5.1-percent-from-2014-anime-bd-dvd-sales-down-6.9-percent/.100044
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Posted 9/10/16

Let's take account of what we already know: First, we know that license fees have been absolutely out of control for the last few years. Bidding wars between Funimation and Crunchyroll, as well as occasional violent disruption from Amazon, Hulu and Netflix have pushed the fees for some shows well over the US$200,000 per episode mark -- $2.6 Million for a 13-episode show. Sales, while healthy, have not gone up anywhere near that much, and this was clearly not sustainable for anime publishers.
This must be a typo about the cost of license fees, because this ANN article. v

According to Masamune Sakaki, a CG creator in the anime industry, an average 13-episode anime season costs around 250 million yen (or $2 million). He also made it clear that most anime can't recoup this expense, and the industry rests on the windfall of a few big hits.
Sounds like the anime companies are breaking even, and the BD/DVD/Merchandise plus the money they get from the Japanese TV companies (assuming they work like US TV companies) is just money in their pockets. Thus BD/DVD sales don't really matter.


The general Japanese animation market is down 6.9% from the previous year, with total sales of 49.082 billion yen (about US$440.948 million). The market has now sustained a two-year consecutive decline. The last time that the market garnered sales below 50 billion yen was in 2004, where the market earned 44.091 billion yen (about US$396.161 million).

Late-night anime made up about half of the market's total sales in 2015. Anime! Anime! Biz notes that though the number of anime produced has increased in recent years, and the market has grown, it has failed to turn around overall Japanese animation sales. Among Japanese anime sales, the Blu-ray Disc market suffered a 2.9% decrease in sales over the past year, and Anime! Anime! Biz postulates that this may herald the start of different purchasing habits for anime fans. It further notes that in recent years, anime has expanded to related markets, such as music, live concert events, and streaming, and that 2015's sales may reflect this.
Honestly the anime industry has been the same since the early 00's if we are talking about disk sales. Looking at the early 00's there were fewer shows, but guess what alot of the show never broke the 5k mark like most shows now. Sure BD sales might be going down in general, but that doesn't mean its because of the large amount of shows we get each season. Could just be economics, I go to Japan every year and the Yen was way stronger two years ago then than it is now, going by the exchange rate.

Talking about second seasons, if you follow the disk sales then you know that Volume to Volume the sales tend to go downward. Which is usually also the case with each continuation of an anime. As we all know disk sales aren't always the deciding factor in continuations, I have seen many anime sell below 3k and get second seasons while others sell over 5k but never see the light of day again. So I wouldn't totally blame bad disk sales for uncompleted anime. The biggest reason they aren't completed is because the source material isn't finished, and original endings tend to get bad backlash; and by the time the source material is finished, the hype was died down from the first season.
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Posted 9/18/16
They must have heard me ( yea right !! ) Seasons 2 of Eccentric Family and Seven Deadly Sins I ope there is more !
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Posted 9/18/16

CKD-Anime wrote:


Let's take account of what we already know: First, we know that license fees have been absolutely out of control for the last few years. Bidding wars between Funimation and Crunchyroll, as well as occasional violent disruption from Amazon, Hulu and Netflix have pushed the fees for some shows well over the US$200,000 per episode mark -- $2.6 Million for a 13-episode show. Sales, while healthy, have not gone up anywhere near that much, and this was clearly not sustainable for anime publishers.
This must be a typo about the cost of license fees, because this ANN article. v

According to Masamune Sakaki, a CG creator in the anime industry, an average 13-episode anime season costs around 250 million yen (or $2 million). He also made it clear that most anime can't recoup this expense, and the industry rests on the windfall of a few big hits.

The two aren't necessarily contradictory. Note that the first quote says, "for some shows" and the second quote says "most anime".


Sounds like the anime companies are breaking even, and the BD/DVD/Merchandise plus the money they get from the Japanese TV companies (assuming they work like US TV companies) is just money in their pockets. Thus BD/DVD sales don't really matter.

I wouldn't go that far, as any production committee is going to hesitant going into a project if they expect up front the BD/DVD sales were going to generate a loss. The only way the project will go forward is if one or other committee members (such as the manga or light novel publisher) are willing to bear more of the costs in return for the company handling the home video rights getting a lower buy-in cost that at least gives them a reasonable expectation of not losing money.

BTW, late night anime doesn't work the same way as US TV companies. Late night anime is more akin to US infomercials, where the slot is paid for. Most of the broadcast costs are recouped from sponsors signed up for the broadcast, but the actual airing of the late night anime itself isn't intended to generate a profit.

The only anime that works the way US TV does is the titles aired in the evening (e.g., One Piece) and mornings.
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Posted 9/18/16

The two aren't necessarily contradictory. Note that the first quote says, "for some shows" and the second quote says "most anime".
My point is if that licensing fees are starting to go over $200,000 (assuming for 20 minute shows most end up selling between 100,000 to 200,000) + the other non-US companies buying licenses, which ends up sounding like licensing is where they get the majority of their revenue, why would a small dip (2-7 %) in BD/DVD sales really effect whether a second comes out or not when amount of sales are only in the few thousands (if even that).

The second quote was taken out of context a bit. I agree with you, BD/DVD are relevant, but if licensing fees are paying for the production then anything beyond that is just profit. Sure I would rather sell 10,000 copies than 5,000 copies; but I wouldn't be worrying about BD/DVD sales bombing when some else is paying the bill. Granted I would rather give the show with better BD/DVD sales a second season before the others.
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Posted 9/18/16 , edited 9/18/16

CKD-Anime wrote:

My point is if that licensing fees are starting to go over $200,000 (assuming for 20 minute shows most end up selling between 100,000 to 200,000) + the other non-US companies buying licenses, which ends up sounding like licensing is where they get the majority of their revenue, why would a small dip (2-7 %) in BD/DVD sales really effect whether a second comes out or not when amount of sales are only in the few thousands (if even that).

The second quote was taken out of context a bit. I agree with you, BD/DVD are relevant, but if licensing fees are paying for the production then anything beyond that is just profit. Sure I would rather sell 10,000 copies than 5,000 copies; but I wouldn't be worrying about BD/DVD sales bombing when some else is paying the bill. Granted I would rather give the show with better BD/DVD sales a second season before the others.

But keep in mind those high licensing fees would often only apply for those series that often end up having better BD/DVD sales. In other words, "Generic Harem Adventure #274" or "Generic Light Novel Magic High School Story #176" would likely have their profitability left in doubt, while "Sequel to Super Popular Title #27" might be in the green before it even airs its first episode.

No doubt there are titles with high expectations and equally high license fees that end up bombing on the streaming and/or BD/DVD fronts, and likewise unexpected hits.
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