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To non-Americans
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Posted 9/17/16 , edited 9/18/16

animeMii20 wrote:

why do people hate us?


Probably a combination of jealousy but also the fact that America has been involved in so much war, entering other peoples countries, have military bases in other peoples countries, invading countries, always telling other countires what to do, westernizing countries, etc
I guess some people probably see Americans as arrogant as well.
Some see America as truely evil.

Me personally, i like America. I'd prefer to be their ally than enemie. Whilst i do not agree with all that they do, i do believe that they make the world feel safer (being their ally). And they do help people alot as well.

Aussies not liking yanks isn't an actual thing or a hate thing, its more just banter and jokingly.
I think that most of the world enjoys Americas music and tv shows and movies.




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Posted 9/17/16

animeMii20 wrote:

why do people hate us?


Arrogance, over-prideful, food quality, health quality, obesity, education system. Stuff like that tends to make us the ass of jokes (at least when I lived in EU).
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Posted 9/17/16

Dark_Alma wrote:


animeMii20 wrote:

why do people hate us?


Arrogance, over-prideful, food quality, health quality, obesity, education system. Stuff like that tends to make us the ass of jokes (at least when I lived in EU).


They're gross generalizations, though. I often think it has more to do with people hating the U.S. government's invasiveness and a limited view into the facets of U.S. culture (or lack of culture) that are indicative of very narrow, direct, or linear thought. Really, though, the same is pretty much true worldwide, however much like racism and sexism tend to be environmentally influenced, so is anti-American sentiment passed down from parent to child.
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Posted 9/17/16 , edited 9/17/16

PandAndy wrote:


Dark_Alma wrote:


animeMii20 wrote:

why do people hate us?


Arrogance, over-prideful, food quality, health quality, obesity, education system. Stuff like that tends to make us the ass of jokes (at least when I lived in EU).


They're gross generalizations, though. I often think it has more to do with people hating the U.S. government's invasiveness and a limited view into the facets of U.S. culture (or lack of culture) that are indicative of very narrow, direct, or linear thought. Really, though, the same is pretty much true worldwide, however much like racism and sexism tend to be environmentally influenced, so is anti-American sentiment passed down from parent to child.


Hm, my family sure didn't pass it down to me. Every male in my family went to West Point, and became a Lt. Colonel or higher (up to a Lt. General). I just was taught to think for myself.

Also, having lived all over the world... I can def say Americans are fatter, have a worse education system, food laws are too lax (why US meat is illegal in many places in the world), we have the highest heart disease rates in the world, have a hell of a lot of pride among other things.

Something I know many Americans haven't done is travel the world. I have been to every continent minus Antarctica and Africa. In each continent I hit at least 3 countries (usually 5-10). With this much knowledge I can make a decent generalization of the US compared to others.
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Posted 9/17/16 , edited 9/19/16

Dark_Alma wrote:

Hm, my family sure didn't pass it down to me. Every male in my family went to West Point, and became a Lt. Colonel or higher (up to a Lt. General). I just was taught to think for myself.

Also, having lived all over the world... I can def say Americans are fatter, have a worse education system, food laws are too lax (why US meat is illegal in many places in the world), we have the highest heart disease rates in the world, have a hell of a lot of pride among other things.

Something I know many Americans haven't done is travel the world. I have been to every continent minus Antarctica and Africa. In each continent I hit at least 3 countries (usually 5-10). With this much knowledge I can make a decent generalization of the US compared to others.


From the limited view of the States that I have had, it's very much the opposite. In the South and Midwest, worldviews seem to be almost hereditary in many cases, and the proportion of sheople to those who truly think for themselves are heavily weighted towards the former. In my area, there are far fewer "fat" people than statistics would have one believe, neither are there a large amount of "skinny" people; most are just average.

The education system is more inefficient than it is inadequate, but that is somewhat subjective and dependent. There are too many factors to lay blame specifically on the education system. Take for example that the socio-economic status of students and crime rates in their respective districts both play a significant role in the education that they receive. Family structure is another matter; where one can afford for a parent to stay home and aid in their children's educations, it will likely appear that the education is better. Then there are factors directly related to the school system and educator initiative: vetting students through on sub-par abilities rather than holding them back or enforcing supplementary education, maintaining a traditionalist attitude towards learning methods and materials, and trying far to hard to achieve "blanket" coverage in a classroom instead of acknowledging that students have individual needs and may need to be distributed into different programs by level of comprehension, for example. The crux is parent to educator relations. Simply put, teachers tread on broken glass when dealing with parents; we can't outright suggest that a student is behind their peers without their parents attributing fault to the educator and the system, nor can we employ remedial solutions without parental consensus which, once again, leads to blame for a students lack of comprehension being placed on the educator and the system. I digress.

I would absolutely agree, however, that Americans, in general, display a lot of pride, but you can't really say that no other country's citizens don't, rather it's a matter of how it's directed and displayed. The patriotic sentiment is abundant, and an overwhelming amount of people will become violent to anyone with a differing perspective--I've been threatened before for calling the U.S. flag a "commercialized piece of cloth with little value;" I could elaborate on that statement, but it really pisses people off when I do.
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Posted 9/17/16

Dark_Alma wrote:
Something I know many Americans haven't done is travel the world. I have been to every continent minus Antarctica and Africa. In each continent I hit at least 3 countries (usually 5-10). With this much knowledge I can make a decent generalization of the US compared to others.


Hmm. My father's done a lot of traveling for his company and he tells me it's pretty much pointless to make a generalization about a country, since there are so many differences within it. Makes sense. I mean, just Edinburgh and Glasgow seemed pretty different to me when I visited Scotland.
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Posted 9/18/16

Kavalion wrote:


Dark_Alma wrote:
Something I know many Americans haven't done is travel the world. I have been to every continent minus Antarctica and Africa. In each continent I hit at least 3 countries (usually 5-10). With this much knowledge I can make a decent generalization of the US compared to others.


Hmm. My father's done a lot of traveling for his company and he tells me it's pretty much pointless to make a generalization about a country, since there are so many differences within it. Makes sense. I mean, just Edinburgh and Glasgow seemed pretty different to me when I visited Scotland.


Every place is different yes. I can not argue that. Then again, there are things that can not be denied.

USA:

2nd most obese country per capita (was 1, Mexico took it)
1st in heart disease
1st in diabetes
Meat is illegal in many Asian and European places
Is "average" in education standards. Scandinavian countries, Asian countries and Canada all have higher standardized test scores
Has a meh police force (Most Scandinavian police forces rarely have to shoot someone).

I can go on and on about statistics. Sure, the USA has its good points. It also has its bad points.

The things I linked above are all are objective facts.
Things like patriotism, racism, sexism and all are subjective. I don't judge based on those. I only judge what can be shown with statistics (cold hard facts).

Feel free to argue if you will.
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Posted 9/18/16 , edited 9/18/16

PandAndy wrote:

From the limited view of the States that I have had, it's very much the opposite. In the South and Midwest, worldviews seem to be almost hereditary in many cases, and the proportion of sheople to those who truly think for themselves are heavily weighted towards the former. In my area, there are far fewer "fat" people than statistics would have one believe, neither are there a large amount of "skinny" people; most are just average.

The education system is more inefficient than it is inadequate, but that is somewhat subjective and dependent. There are too many factors to lay blame specifically on the education system. Take for example that the socio-economic status of students and crime rates in their respective districts both play a significant role in the education that they receive. Family structure is another matter; where one can afford for a parent to stay home and aid in their children's educations, it will likely appear that the education is better. Then there are factors directly related to the school system and educator initiative: vetting students through on sub-par abilities rather than holding them back or enforcing supplementary education, maintaining a traditionalist attitude towards learning methods and materials, and trying far to hard to achieve "blanket" coverage in a classroom instead of acknowledging that students have individual needs and may need to be distributed into different programs by level of comprehension, for example. The crux is parent to educator relations. Simply put, teachers tread on broken glass when dealing with parents; we can't outright suggest that a student is behind their peers without their parents attributing fault to the educator and the system, nor can we employ remedial solutions without parental consensus which, once again, leads to blame for a students lack of comprehension being placed on the educator and the system. I digress.

I would absolutely agree, however, that Americans, in general, display a lot of pride, but you can't really say that no other country's citizens don't, rather it's a matter of how it's directed and displayed. The patriotic sentiment is abundant, and an overwhelming amount of people will become violent to anyone with a differing perspective--I've been threatened before for calling the U.S. flag a "commercialized piece of cloth with little value;" I could elaborate on that statement, but it really pisses people off when I do.


Edit: Accidently posted w/o content.

I am glad you have a decent view of America's education system. Both my parents are now teachers, so I have a lot of experience on this subject.

America is "average" when it comes to standardized testing. Scandinavian countries, Asian countries and Canada all destroy the USA when it comes to test scores.

Much of this is due to what you said, individual needs, parent teacher relationships and all that fun stuff. I would love to see the USA adopt a German/Scandinavian type of education. In that I mean one where, at a certain point, people will be trained for blue collar or white collar jobs. Some people want to go into further education and some want to become a welder or a truck driver. In doing this, they will be able to attain what is needed to further their life with great ability.

There is the stereotype of the German Engineer after all!

Also, I have lived in the West, Central, South and New England areas of the USA (12 places in the USA overall). Central US were somewhat fatter than usual. South had major issues (I see a lot of land whales), New England was thin as ever loving hell and the West USA was thinner than most. A lot of this has to do with the foods that are eaten.

Central/South USA loves their red meat and friend foods with all that creamy ranch and Caesar sauce. West and New England lives near the sea so they eat a lot more seafood. Seafood is much lower in fat. Also, New England/West USA has vegetables and fruits as a primary food source. Central and South have it as a secondary.

Friends love coming over to my place to eat because I always make a well balanced meal (and authentic to wherever I stole the food from! Perk of having lived everywhere, you can make a hell of a cookbook!)

Also, I liked your last paragraph of patriotism. Many places are very patriotic and I wont argue that. USA is just #1 like they like to be! #1 HEART DISEASE! #1 DIABETES! WOOOO
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Posted 9/18/16 , edited 9/18/16
Well what can I say to what people think of the US.
Sometimes you just get a lot more special people out of there some that is quite highly developed in certain areas (sometimes by what they are allowed to do/test/create but that can also be a negative)
Like Alma said there is many things that is allowed that none in other more developed countries would really allow.
Chemicals used in a lot of stuff, rules need to be put on drinks really for soda etc (as they can cause brain damage, diabetes and so on)
Where the uneducated have more sense then educated people or what you guys has as "news"...

Media fails to pressure Wayne into believe in there being still much racism today
https://youtu.be/IhfB_QWy4DA

Wish US could handle what they got a bit better.
Soon the same with UK and how they somehow have gone backwards in teaching? (gender studies etc)
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Posted 9/18/16

stars201 wrote:

Close the borders

Not just for Americans, for everyone really


No wonder you find me idiotic with a suggestion like that. Of course, assuming you're serious.
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Posted 9/18/16

ishe5555 wrote:


Kitahoshi_Hazel wrote:


Nalaniel wrote:

Only if they learn the native language of the country they're immigrating to.


Yup.

They should probably learn about the laws of the country they're emigrating to as well.


Anyone emigrating to another country should learn the language, laws, and culture of the country they are emigrating to. Expecting the country to which you are emigrating to learn and adopt your language and culture and bend their laws because you are emigrating there is ridiculous.


except, that is what a lot of them do
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23 / F / Anime world...
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Posted 9/18/16
Close borders to Americans.

I know this is generalising but I don't want dumb Americans coming to my country and telling us how we should behave or whatever.
My country is just really susceptible to white culture because we try to copy. We try to be "white". And I don't want them coming here and my people will end up worshipping them for no apparent reason. So no thanks.
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Posted 9/18/16

Hrafna wrote:

Will you accept waves of American refugees in 2019, or will you vote to close the borders?


We will happily accept them if they work for us and move legally
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20 / M / Bundaberg, Queens...
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Posted 9/18/16

stars201 wrote:

Close the borders

Not just for Americans, for everyone really


you seem like a hateful person despite what everyone else says about you
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Posted 9/18/16 , edited 9/18/16

Ryulightorb wrote:
you seem like a hateful person despite what everyone else says about you
what?
People say anything about that person?
*stares*

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