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Post Reply 22 fascinating maps that show how Americans speak English differently across the US
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Posted 10/5/16
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Posted 10/5/16


I was surprised to see that "rotary" was so much just a New England thing! (I've lived all my life in New England; had no idea it wasn't also fairly common elsewhere.)
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Posted 10/5/16 , edited 10/5/16

lorreen wrote:



I was surprised to see that "rotary" was so much just a New England thing! (I've lived all my life in New England; had no idea it wasn't also fairly common elsewhere.)


I use both traffic circle and roundabout, I have never heard of rotary




I lol'd at "thedevil is beating his wife " tho
edit: brew thru's are cool
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Posted 10/5/16
TIL: I fit nowhere. I use terms from every place as I have lived in every damn place.

Each time I moved to a new geographic location I had to learn a new set of words. From you guys to y'all. Pop to soda to cola, etc.

I still cant say pop in Texas as people will have no idea what I am talking about.
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Posted 10/5/16
Quite a fascinating map this is, indeed. What I just didn't realize is that there are so many ways to speak English across America. I figured there would be many knowing full well that people in Texas, Boston, New York, and other places have distinct dialects, but not 22.
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Posted 10/5/16
I thought I sounded nothing like where I lived... this is pretty accurate for me tbh.
It's funny that the English language is so different from place to place.
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Posted 10/5/16
This may be why everywhere I go, people say I have an accent. I talk like all of these people at once.
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Posted 10/5/16

gornotck wrote:

This may be why everywhere I go, people say I have an accent. I talk like all of these people at once.


lol , I have a slight accent because I couldn't talk till I was 8 so I took speech therapy, its lessened over the years but I used to be asked a lot "where are you from?"

my therapist I think was from new england
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27 / F / SC
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Posted 10/5/16
"and the south is really into brand loyalty"

idk we just call everything coke lolol

and yup, we say the devil is beating his wife hahaha wow i didn't realize that was specific to us pft

drive thru liquor store? what? the red dot store dont offer that service son haha

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Posted 10/5/16
You know what's really regional? Referring to people having a disagreement, up to an all out brawl, as 'squabbling'.
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Posted 10/5/16 , edited 10/5/16

lorreen wrote:



I was surprised to see that "rotary" was so much just a New England thing! (I've lived all my life in New England; had no idea it wasn't also fairly common elsewhere.)


Down in CT we call it a rotary too. To be fair I'm sure its different in Boston, you know with the bubblers and whatnot

EDIT: When I went to Michigan a few years back everyone calls soda "pop." You will never here that in Southern/Western New England, found that quite interesting.

Furthermore I once took the T into Boston, the conductor had such a thick Southie accent he might as well have been speaking a foreign language, probably the only time I couldn't understand a damn thing when someone was speaking English to me. My friends in Latin America always get a kick outta that one.

Then there is slang. My friend from Ohio says "let's get split" in lieu of "let's get hammered" when it comes to drinking a lot. Swear I never heard that one before in my life until he told me that one night. When I looked puzzled he did make sure I know that us Easterners are a strange bunch
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Posted 10/5/16
I didn't even realize that mayonnaise and crayon could be said so differently. anyone know if theres a version for city specific dialects like pittsburghese and new york neighborhood's and stuff?
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Posted 10/5/16 , edited 10/5/16

lorreen wrote:



I was surprised to see that "rotary" was so much just a New England thing! (I've lived all my life in New England; had no idea it wasn't also fairly common elsewhere.)


I was in the "I have no word for this" camp. I guess it's cause those things don't exist where I live.

I was shocked to learn that there was such a thing as "drive-thru liquor stores!" Thus, I had no word for them things, *too.

EDIT:

*either.
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Posted 10/5/16
I'm from Lil' Rhody, and we pronounce the words bubbler and soda as bub-la and so-der. Just drop the 'er' and add an 'a' or if has an 'er' drop it and add an 'a'. It's all very scientific.
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Posted 10/5/16


"The devil is beating his wife" Seriously? What even...?

And do most people really pronounce Syrup with a "sir" sound? That's weird.

Looks like putting on sneakers is just a Northeast thing. Those southern Florida people must feel so out of place.
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