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Post Reply can you still get pregnant with one ovary?
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Posted 10/11/16

iriomote wrote:


MidoriNoTora wrote:

Bzzzt. Wrong answer.
Apparently that information is the result of some dodgy scientific thinking from the 1950s.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/eggs-unlimited-an-extraordinary-tale-of-scientific-discovery-7624715.html

Interesting, although it's potentially a moot point:

"Tilly and Telfer both believe that the menopause may not be due to a shortage of egg cells per se, but a depletion of the cells within the ovary that are needed to support and nurture oocytes."

By working those support cells twice as hard within a single ovary they may be depleted more quickly, and thus result in an earlier menopause. I'm an engineer though, not a doctor, which is why I phrased my original comment as a question rather than a statement to begin with.

I prefer when things don't bleed on me while I'm disassembling them.

Edit: It looks like I may have been right. Most google sources seem to indicate that early menopause is a risk for women who have undergone a unilateral oophorectomy (yeesh, what a mouthful). So it would probably be a bad idea to delay having children until your 30s if this is the case for you.


early menopause? seriously? like how early
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Posted 10/11/16

redokami wrote:

early menopause? seriously? like how early

A lot of sources said the full effects of unilateral oophorectomies on pre-menopausal women are understudied. Most stuff I saw just warned of it being a possible side effect along with a host of other health concerns.

However, one Norwegian study I saw was fairly promising, as it indicated women who had undergone the procedure only underwent menopause roughly 1 year earlier than their national average (putting it on par with the impact of other health factors, like smoking). Which, if accurate, would make it far less of a risk than some other sources seemed to imply.

Just to reiterate: I'm no doctor, just a schmuck glancing at some periodicals, so it's quite possible I'm mistaken in part or in full.
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