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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16

RaisedInACult wrote:

that's why sparring is so important, to real time habituate proper movements

and if learning tai chi, having a teacher that knows the martial application is invaluable, they wind up showing you the martial application of every single bit of the form.

very similar to learning to play guitar and....write a guitar solo live off the top of your head, hahaha

but its the meditation that actually completes the mind quickness after the physical moves are well in habit.


Yeah. I'm lucky with my teacher of a number of reasons. One is that he teaches martial application.

However, we do not spar.

I really want to find a sparring partner, even if we don't use any specific techniques and kind of do our own thing.

That being said, anything I "fashion" for my own purposes is impossible to really practice in sparring, because they are literally designed to break things and immediately end the fight. (again, most of these probably exist in some form or another in other martial arts)
Posted 10/28/16
taiji sparring requires very padded walls
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16
Name: I'd say but I share it with my worthless and now dead biological father . And he doesn't deserve the dignity of being remembered by anyone.
Art(s): Jeet Kune Do , HEMA ( specifically Longsword, Arming Sword + Shield, and Archery) , Kenjutsu ( specifically Niten Ichi-ryu and even more specifically Nito Seiho. )
Rank(s): I left the school where I first learned Kenjutsu over a philosophical debate with the instructors so no rank there since then I've trained on my own in both Kenjutsu and HEMA. This is largely due to my stance when it comes to sparring, one most disagree with. Jeet Kune Do is something I practice more as a philosophy then in a structured environment. As I believe the basic fighting techniques of Jeet Kune Do are child's play and the more important reason is the why not the what and where.

What is a lesson you will never forget? Why?

For Musashi, the difference is that a samurai or a Bushi (man of the Martial Way) must always win, must
always be ready, and in other words, must always live and survive. That was about the only thing me and the instructors agreed on during my time learning Kenjutsu in a structured environment. Of course we disagreed on exactly how one should go about it and it caused a rift that made staying impossible. Still it is a lesson that has served me better then most.

Did you compete any?

I use to but my aggressive behaviour was not popular. I saw it as a fight and acted accordingly. They saw it as a mere game and thus I was banned from competition in most places. Nowadays though even if I was allowed I have too much on my plate to indulge in showmanship.

Advice you would give to someone considering martial arts?

As Bruce Lee said Learn from everyone, keep what is best, and add what is uniquely yours. You will come to disagree with many tradition bound fools in your journey because of keeping what is best and adding what is uniquely yours. But don't let it bother you none. The true fighter knows survival is all that matters. Honour is all well and good but the cares of those who love you matter more then your pride. Do not throw them away so carelessly just to fulfil your pride and honour. For your life does not and never will belong wholly to you. In the arms of your loved ones is the only forgiveness you will find and ever need.
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16


The beauty is Jeet Kune Do is not in it being a martial art, but a philosophy.

10 people can all follow Jeet Kune Do, and all have various ways of fighting. I have also studied Jeet Kune Do, in its principles. However, I've never practiced in any technique or form, nor was Bruce Lee's intention that it be a form or style at all. It is not a system of how to move and fight, but a philosophy of how to move and fight.
I try to apply those. Jeet Kune Do also emphasizes bursting, which I'm a huge fan of, because I like to go defensive, and bursting allows for that. It also emphasizes strong side forward and leading with fast straight jabs. These things don't work for me, so much, due to how I use my left, how I move, how I prefer defensive reactionary techniques, and my slowish (I mean, compared to Bruce Lee, who isn't slow?) speed of my strikes.
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Posted 10/28/16
Art(s): Taekwondo and Kuk Sool
Rank(s): black belt (tkd) and white belt (ks)
What is a lesson you will never forget? Why?
Speed and precision are infinitely more powerful than strength. Someone who just throws their strength around can never win against someone with real skill.
Did you compete any?
I'd hardly call it competing... Just a small school tournament one time, and it was kind of a failure since all the judges were half asleep and awarded points unfairly. They all got yelled at for it, too.
Advice you would give to someone considering martial arts?
You can't expect results overnight, and you can't expect to get anywhere by barely trying. Sure you might rank up a bit, but your skills will be useless. But if you keep at it, you'll be able to do some amazing things.
Anything else you would like to add:
Not really
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16
Name: Kevz (Kevin obviously )
Art(s): Mixed Martial Arts (studio mixes Karate, Ground Grappling, Boxing and some aspects of Aikido) with both a self defense and competitive aspect
Rank(s):Green belt (equivalent to 8th Kyu/Gup in other systems)
What is a lesson you will never forget? Why? Hmm, when you start out your going to be utterly confused, you are going to feel pretty crappy while you get your butt kicked day in and day out. Over time you start picking up on the little things and later you'll be able to put everything together and become someone junior students can rely on. Moral of the story, with perseverance you will eventually become a skilled martial artist.
Did you compete any? No way, I'm still a beginner rank, want to continue practicing until I have more confidence to do competitions.
Advice you would give to someone considering martial arts? As a said above, starting out can be a bit overwhelming. You're going to be outmatched in sparring sessions and that is ok. Keep at it and make sure if you don't get something seek out assistance from your teacher or senior/higher ranked students.
Anything else you would like to add: Added benefit, its great weight loss, lost about 8 lbs since starting in February and can lift twice the weight now, plus I can finally get some decent submissions in ground fights. Feels good
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Posted 10/28/16
Name: Jelly Jiggler? lol
Art(s): Tae Kwon Do
Rank(s): First Degree Black Belt
What is a lesson you will never forget? Why?
Never give up, no matter how hard it is. Indomitable Spirit baby
Did you compete any? Literally did my first tournement just this past weekend. Went 11-0, but now I know what it takes. Just a learning experience.
Advice you would give to someone considering martial arts? It isn't easy to become really good at it. There is a lot of repetition involved. You will get sweaty, you will get hurt at some point, and It will take a long time for you to become as good as the people you see on TV. Even if you don't plan on doing it for that long, always remember what you learn from it, it may save your life someday. (or just improve your life overall!)
Anything else you would like to add: Run away from any fight, no matter what. Doesn't matter if you get called a pussy, it is much better to avoid a confrontation, that way NOBODY GETS HURT. (that includes your attacker, but mostly yourself. You do not want to be the guy who gets put on worldstar ) If there is truly no way to get out of a fight, do your best to end the fight quickly, whether that means holding them on the ground until somebody shows up and helps, or creating an opening and running the hell away.
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16

HolyDrumstick wrote:


The beauty is Jeet Kune Do is not in it being a martial art, but a philosophy.

10 people can all follow Jeet Kune Do, and all have various ways of fighting. I have also studied Jeet Kune Do, in its principles. However, I've never practiced in any technique or form, nor was Bruce Lee's intention that it be a form or style at all. It is not a system of how to move and fight, but a philosophy of how to move and fight.
I try to apply those. Jeet Kune Do also emphasizes bursting, which I'm a huge fan of, because I like to go defensive, and bursting allows for that. It also emphasizes strong side forward and leading with fast straight jabs. These things don't work for me, so much, due to how I use my left, how I move, how I prefer defensive reactionary techniques, and my slowish (I mean, compared to Bruce Lee, who isn't slow?) speed of my strikes.


Exactly why I prefer it as a both a fighting style and a philosophy. Jeet Kune Do is as Bruce Lee said like water , flexible enough to go around the hard stuff yet powerful enough to make cliffs crumble into the ocean.

For example you prefer a defensive and reactionary stance. I prefer using my size, strength, speed, and endurance to initiate the fight and wear them down. Death by a thousand cuts ya know. Ya don't always have to make each hit full force but keep them rocking back on their heels and when the openings show hit them with everything you got.

However both our preferred methods have their merits and there is no right or wrong. After all Jeet Kune Do isn't about learning one master's way of fighting and trying to conform to it. That alone I think elevates it above the rest . In the end one could argue Jeet Kune Do isn't even about fighting at all.

And of course eventually I will have to change . Rivers start out as whitewater but at their mouths there're calm deltas. And just like a river I won't always be whitewater. After all as a soldier I know I might very well take an injury that might force me to reconsider how I approach a fight or indeed if a fight is even a good idea. If nothing else I will grow old one day and no longer be a man in his prime.
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Posted 10/28/16

Ranwolf wrote:

Exactly why I prefer it as a both a fighting style and a philosophy. Jeet Kune Do is as Bruce Lee said like water , flexible enough to go around the hard stuff yet powerful enough to make cliffs crumble into the ocean.

For example you prefer a defensive and reactionary stance. I prefer using my size, strength, speed, and endurance to initiate the fight and wear them down. Death by a thousand cuts ya know. Ya don't always have to make each hit full force but keep them rocking back on their heels and when the openings show hit them with everything you got.

However both our preferred methods have their merits and there is no right or wrong. After all Jeet Kune Do isn't about learning one master's way of fighting and trying to conform to it. That alone I think elevates it above the rest . In the end one could argue Jeet Kune Do isn't even about fighting at all.

And of course eventually I will have to change . Rivers start out as whitewater but at their mouths there're calm deltas. And just like a river I won't always be whitewater. After all as a soldier I know I might very well take an injury that might force me to reconsider how I approach a fight or indeed if a fight is even a good idea. If nothing else I will grow old one day and no longer be a man in his prime.


This is exactly how I feel. Jeet Kune Do is about being the best 'you' you can be.
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Posted 10/28/16
I'm a boxer at heart but I've been studying a lot of other stuff. My elbow's been destroyed though.
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Posted 10/28/16

pwnerj wrote:

I'm a boxer at heart but I've been studying a lot of other stuff. My elbow's been destroyed though.


I know the feeling. My knees used to give me trouble from an old injury, but Tai Chi has helped. According to the doctor, the reason is because the problems I had in my knee were basically treated almost in a physical therapy type way with the Tai Chi exercises.

But, I also have issues where I had my ulnar nerve relocated. I don't have a funny bone in my right arm, because that nerve is now on the side/top of my arm. However, that really only bothers my arm's endurance, because the muscles were severed in the surgery. In a street fight or doing Tai Chi, it doesn't really matter. Now, if I got in a boxing ring, the effects might start to show.

I have no idea why I'm rambling. BUT, I really just wanted to tell you to try to find a way to work it out and recuperate that elbow the best you can. Heat, exercise, ice.... Maybe with a little work you can figure out how to get around your injury. Good luck, man. Don't give up if you really want to do ti.
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16
I've always been interested in learning a martial art not to be flashy and a showoff, but to be able to protect incase I would need it but I figured I wouldn't be able to get into it because of my weight but over the summer, I had a Korean friend who would show little tidbits here and there of what he knows, which is Aikido. And he told me my weight wouldn't be a hindrance because all it takes determination and patience.
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Posted 10/28/16
I used to do some, but in hindsight I think it was kind of for a ripoff school. I've been considering maybe doing some tai chi or capoeria for exercise but haven't found the time. Or resources.
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16
Name: sakurablossom729 (not giving real one)

Art: Taekwondo

Rank: 3rd degree black belt

What is a lesson you will never forget? Why? That you don't need strength to win a match and no matter boy or girl you can achieve alot in it and become a very high rank and learn some life skills. Also winning is not always important its just having fun in what you do.

Did you compete any? Yes tons of tournaments (to many to count), got another one in about a month. Been competing since I was a yellow belt

Advice you would give to someone considering martial arts? don't be scared to do something like this it can its not all about fighting you can form some great friendships

Anything else you would like to add: My boyfriend is a 4th degree black belt and a new district champion and i am 3 time state champion, we met though karate. Been doing martial arts for 15 yrs and still enjoy it today.
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Posted 10/28/16
Boxing but it was mainly as a fun alternative to a regular gym. I stopped years ago and these days, I just utilize the 6-mile long runner's path near my house, a pair of adjustable dumbbells, 3 different resistance bands, and a pull-up bar that I can hook up to a door frame. So..no more martial arts for me.
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