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Post Reply Japanese teachers violence towards students
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23 / M / AZ
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Posted 10/28/16

YAMANASHI —
The Yamanashi board of education has demanded schools take strict preventive measures against violence by teachers, following an incident on Oct 24 in which a teacher at Kofu Josai Yamanashi Prefectural High School got angry when a student came to school with the sides of his head shaved. The teacher, a man in his 50s, slapped the boy at least 10 times at an after-school club activity and then ordered three other students to help him forcibly shave the boy’s head, Sankei Shimbun reported.

Another male instructor who was at the scene verbally abused the student, and forced the other three students to shave their hair off as an act of collective responsibility.

The principal of the school found out after the boy’s parents complained. After the incident, the principal and both teachers visited the homes of the four boys involved to apologize, Sankei reported.

In another incident at Enzan High School recently, a male teacher in his 30s punched a student who had been sleeping in class to wake him up. In August, at Minobu High School, a male teacher kicked a student’s leg.

The board of education head, Mamoru Moriya, said physical violence cannot be tolerated at any level because of its emotional effects on the students.

Japan Today


https://www.japantoday.com/category/national/view/yamanashi-teacher-slaps-student-cuts-his-hair-off


I can imagine the outrage it would cause here in the states.
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31 / M / L'Étoile du Nord,...
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Posted 10/28/16
I thought they used bamboo swords or bamboo sticks for corporal punishment of students.
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16
Spare me, a little discipline never hurt anyone . Besides last time I checked Japanese schools had some rather draconian laws when it came to behaviour and appearance at schools. And I am a firm believer if you break the rules you should be punished as harshly as possible.
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Posted 10/28/16
i think this is a little more than a "little discipline"
Posted 10/28/16
I'm not surprised by this one bit.
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16

Ranwolf wrote:

Spare me, a little discipline never hurt anyone . Besides last time I checked Japanese schools had some rather draconian laws when it came to behaviour and appearance at schools. And I am a firm believer if you break the rules you should be punished as harshly as possible.


There is a difference between punishment and discipline. There is no need to slap a kid for a haircut then force your students to commit an illegal act of assaulting that boy. This is just absurd.

I come from America and we have a tradition of rebelling against unjust rules and laws.
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Posted 10/28/16

Ranwolf wrote:

Spare me, a little discipline never hurt anyone . Besides last time I checked Japanese schools had some rather draconian laws when it came to behaviour and appearance at schools. And I am a firm believer if you break the rules you should be punished as harshly as possible.


i know, you're just trolling here, but. those are kids. disciplinary measures are needed sometimes, but they went way overboard.
hitting a student in the head several times, possibly causing concussions, just because you don't like the hairstyle. they're not in the military. they're not soldiers. they are kids. something like a suspension would more than suffice.

consider the bullying, social pressures, teachers abusing their power over the students, and it's little wonder suicide rate is notoriously high in Japan. they even have a forest nicknamed for suicide for goodness sake.
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16

namealreadytaken wrote:


Ranwolf wrote:

Spare me, a little discipline never hurt anyone . Besides last time I checked Japanese schools had some rather draconian laws when it came to behaviour and appearance at schools. And I am a firm believer if you break the rules you should be punished as harshly as possible.


i know, you're just trolling here, but. those are kids. disciplinary measures are needed sometimes, but they went way overboard.
hitting a student in the head several times, possibly causing concussions, just because you don't like the hairstyle. they're not in the military. they're not soldiers. they are kids. something like a suspension would more than suffice.

consider the bullying, social pressures, teachers abusing their power over the students, and it's little wonder suicide rate is notoriously high in Japan. they even have a forest nicknamed for suicide for goodness sake.


You proposing half measures like suspensions to students breaking the rules they agreed to when they decided to go a particular educational institute. That does not work and there is literal mountain ranges worth of that point in Western schools. Ill disciplined and not ready students the Western high schools are spewing out.

They may not be soldiers but students perhaps need a little harshness in their lives to actually turn them into worthwhile adults.
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16

Rujikin wrote:


Ranwolf wrote:

Spare me, a little discipline never hurt anyone . Besides last time I checked Japanese schools had some rather draconian laws when it came to behaviour and appearance at schools. And I am a firm believer if you break the rules you should be punished as harshly as possible.


There is a difference between punishment and discipline. There is no need to slap a kid for a haircut then force your students to commit an illegal act of assaulting that boy. This is just absurd.

I come from America and we have a tradition of rebelling against unjust rules and laws.


You also have a record of some of the worst academic performance among your student body and an ocean of social issues among them as well.
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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16

Gross1985 wrote:

I thought they used bamboo swords or bamboo sticks for corporal punishment of students.



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Posted 10/28/16 , edited 10/28/16

Ranwolf wrote:

Spare me, a little discipline never hurt anyone . Besides last time I checked Japanese schools had some rather draconian laws when it came to behaviour and appearance at schools. And I am a firm believer if you break the rules you should be punished as harshly as possible.


You, know, it's crazy. We are about the same age, have both served in the military, and share a lot of opinions.

At the same time, we're so very different on many things.

To address OP and this post, Ranwolf is right about the principle that if you break rules, you should be punished. And, honestly, corporal punishment has been condemned way more than it should be.

Where me and Ranwolf vary is that I believe punishment should be a pragmatic response to elicit the best behavior of that individual. So, sometimes, max punishment is counter productive, and results in making the situation worse.

For example, in the article it discussed being punished for sleeping in class. I never slept in class. Not only is it disrespectful, I was too interested in lectures and engaged in the conversation, OR if it was a terrible teacher, I was busy reading. However, in my senior year in high school, I over worked myself for Advanced Placement/College Prep courses. Everything was due at the same time, and AP classes were like normal classes on steroids. I mean, I did everything normal classes did, except I had an extra essay or assignment or project each week.

Then, we had our semester projects, which were all due at the same time. So, I worked for about three days, barely getting sleep, and stayed up all night on the night prior to the due date.

Now some may say I procrastinated, and I did, to a degree. However, having 4 AP class semester projects, plus all the other stuff, plus I had chores at home.... it was tough.

And, I had a really understanding teacher. So, the due date, I fell asleep in my algebra class (by the way, I always sucked at math, so it was NOT one of my AP classes). The teacher just let me sleep. When the bell rang, I was embarrassed and apologized. She was just like, "Hey, you worked your butt off to get everything done. We all see that. It isn't going to hurt you to sleep through one of my classes."

So that pragmatic attitude of the teacher was amazing. She understood my situation and gave me a little wiggle room that one time, because she knew I didn't deserve punishment.

My point behind all this is to say, the best punishment is an appropriate response to the problem. Your goal when you punish is to correct behavior.

So, I mean, I don't see how punching a kid who is sleeping will make him more responsive to the lecture. That's going to piss him off, and one day a teacher like that is going to get his ass kicked by a student.

But, hey, that's just an opinion.

And Ranwolf, I'm not targeting you in any negative way. I'm simply pointing out how we are both very similar and very different at the same time. Cheers.
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Posted 10/28/16
Meh I went to a catholic school in Malaysia where the nuns frequently beat kids with rattan sticks & one kid I saw got stripped bare bottom & put on the teachers knee, spanked hard & then spent the rest of class facing the corner.
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Posted 10/28/16

Ranwolf wrote:


Rujikin wrote:


Ranwolf wrote:

Spare me, a little discipline never hurt anyone . Besides last time I checked Japanese schools had some rather draconian laws when it came to behaviour and appearance at schools. And I am a firm believer if you break the rules you should be punished as harshly as possible.


There is a difference between punishment and discipline. There is no need to slap a kid for a haircut then force your students to commit an illegal act of assaulting that boy. This is just absurd.

I come from America and we have a tradition of rebelling against unjust rules and laws.


You also have a record of some of the worst academic performance among your student body and an ocean of social issues among them as well.


We are having the same problem but on the opposite side of the spectrum. We are going too far towards never punishing or disciplining. There must be a balance.
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Posted 10/28/16
I had seen it when I was a kid.
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Posted 10/28/16

HolyDrumstick wrote:


Ranwolf wrote:

Spare me, a little discipline never hurt anyone . Besides last time I checked Japanese schools had some rather draconian laws when it came to behaviour and appearance at schools. And I am a firm believer if you break the rules you should be punished as harshly as possible.


You, know, it's crazy. We are about the same age, have both served in the military, and share a lot of opinions.

At the same time, we're so very different on many things.

To address OP and this post, Ranwolf is right about the principle that if you break rules, you should be punished. And, honestly, corporal punishment has been condemned way more than it should be.

Where me and Ranwolf vary is that I believe punishment should be a pragmatic response to elicit the best behavior of that individual. So, sometimes, max punishment is counter productive, and results in making the situation worse.

For example, in the article it discussed being punished for sleeping in class. I never slept in class. Not only is it disrespectful, I was too interested in lectures and engaged in the conversation, OR if it was a terrible teacher, I was busy reading. However, in my senior year in high school, I over worked myself for Advanced Placement/College Prep courses. Everything was due at the same time, and AP classes were like normal classes on steroids. I mean, I did everything normal classes did, except I had an extra essay or assignment or project each week.

Then, we had our semester projects, which were all due at the same time. So, I worked for about three days, barely getting sleep, and stayed up all night on the night prior to the due date.

Now some may say I procrastinated, and I did, to a degree. However, having 4 AP class semester projects, plus all the other stuff, plus I had chores at home.... it was tough.

And, I had a really understanding teacher. So, the due date, I fell asleep in my algebra class (by the way, I always sucked at math, so it was NOT one of my AP classes). The teacher just let me sleep. When the bell rang, I was embarrassed and apologized. She was just like, "Hey, you worked your butt off to get everything done. We all see that. It isn't going to hurt you to sleep through one of my classes."

So that pragmatic attitude of the teacher was amazing. She understood my situation and gave me a little wiggle room that one time, because she knew I didn't deserve punishment.

My point behind all this is to say, the best punishment is an appropriate response to the problem. Your goal when you punish is to correct behavior.

So, I mean, I don't see how punching a kid who is sleeping will make him more responsive to the lecture. That's going to piss him off, and one day a teacher like that is going to get his ass kicked by a student.

But, hey, that's just an opinion.

And Ranwolf, I'm not targeting you in any negative way. I'm simply pointing out how we are both very similar and very different at the same time. Cheers.


This people right here is an opinion I can agree with in principle if not wholly . I'd think much higher of the rest of you if you thought like this and didn't knee jerk to some leftist pipe dream like you always do.
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