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Post Reply Are You Getting a PS4 Pro ?
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Posted 17 days ago , edited 17 days ago

PandAndy wrote:

"Free multiplayer" is a case-by-case scenario. Most MMOs that tout themselves as F2P are notorious for game-breaking microtransactions. The less derpy business models are subscription based, which either balances out with or casts a shadow on the PSN/Microsoft network subscriptions. A PC is, undoubtedly, more versatile since you can just keep upgrading as components reach EOL, but it pretty much ends up being six one way half-a-dozen the other. All of the savings you have in game costs (a standard $29.99 vs. $59.99, or thereabouts at launch) are eaten by the much shorter service life of the equipment. That isn't considering user competency, either; some (if not most) people won't have the skills to (1) build a computer from scratch, (2) maintain said computer for optimal performance, and (3) fix it if it breaks. Given that viruses and other unwanteds are several times more likely on a PC, a console is a better option if being used exclusively for gaming.



Free multiplayer is free. If you want to play subscription MMO's thats on you. But if I buy a copy of Battlefield 1 I turn on my monitor and click play. I don't have to pay for multiplayer its included as a service in the price. Plus most people I know are not going to build a gaming PC to strictly play subscription MMO's. There are plenty of Freemium games on PSN/Xbox live that work off micro-transaction as well. I don't see how this is relevant to PC's so much as mobile phones.

You are welcome to build any PC you want, that is one of the freedoms it offers you. Just because someone chooses to upgrade early don't make it a con. Before the PS4/Xbox 1 where announced I knew a lot of people who where wanting a upgrade but did not have a console out to do so. The argument isn't that you can't build a PC more expensive then a console because that is beyond a doubt possible. What I'm say is you can build a PC for the same price or less then a console with similar performance.

Also at this point is when consoles have the best argument. Next year when we have new graphics cards and processors coming out it will only make the price of entry for PC gaming cheaper. There is 3 tiers of PC components Budget,price to performance, and high end. Stuff gets cheaper with each year as better hardware is released for less. The GTX 680 released in 2012 and was considered a "high end" graphics card. They cost upwards of $600 today you can buy a GTX 1050TI for $150 that easily beats that graphics card.

Building a PC really isnt hard at all. It's pretty much adult legos. People have this idea to build a PC your soldering on stuff and running wires to other parts of the PC. Plug and play that is it, really nothing to it what so ever. As for maintaining a PC its not hard either. Go buy a $5 can of air duster and once a month spray everything off. Anti viruses are very effective, I'm not a expert PC user and I haven't had a virus in years. Worst case you get a virus format the drive and open your cd drive put in your OS disk and click install.

PC parts also have warranty's, many motherboards have trouble shoot features to tell you exactly what is wrong.

As for "a console is a better option if being used exclusively for gaming" I fail to see really what other a console can be used for. I mean you have netflix... but still. A gaming PC is still a PC and we are coming in on 2017 a PC fastly becoming a necessity more then ever. A lot of people work in offices, that allows them to bring their work home and finish it their. Kids need PC's for school projects and papers. If your a college student you most certainly need one. I fail to see how a console can really do any of these things. Which is just another positive about a PC. For the price of a modern laptop you can build a PC and game on it as well.
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Posted 17 days ago , edited 17 days ago
I screwed up the quotes trying to not make a pyramid


Think I fixed it
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Posted 17 days ago

LosingHope wrote:

Free multiplayer is free. If you want to play subscription MMO's thats on you. But if I buy a copy of Battlefield 1 I turn on my monitor and click play. I don't have to pay for multiplayer its included as a service in the price. Plus most people I know are not going to build a gaming PC to strictly play subscription MMO's. There are plenty of Freemium games on PSN/Xbox live that work off micro-transaction as well. I don't see how this is relevant to PC's so much as mobile phones.

You are welcome to build any PC you want, that is one of the freedoms it offers you. Just because someone chooses to upgrade early don't make it a con. Before the PS4/Xbox 1 where announced I knew a lot of people who where wanting a upgrade but did not have a console out to do so. The argument isn't that you can't build a PC more expensive then a console because that is beyond a doubt possible. What I'm say is you can build a PC for the same price or less then a console with similar performance.

Also at this point is when consoles have the best argument. Next year when we have new graphics cards and processors coming out it will only make the price of entry for PC gaming cheaper. There is 3 tiers of PC components Budget,price to performance, and high end. Stuff gets cheaper with each year as better hardware is released for less. The GTX 680 released in 2012 and was considered a "high end" graphics card. They cost upwards of $600 today you can buy a GTX 1050TI for $150 that easily beats that graphics card.

Building a PC really isnt hard at all. It's pretty much adult legos. People have this idea to build a PC your soldering on stuff and running wires to other parts of the PC. Plug and play that is it, really nothing to it what so ever. As for maintaining a PC its not hard either. Go buy a $5 can of air duster and once a month spray everything off. Anti viruses are very effective, I'm not a expert PC user and I haven't had a virus in years. Worst case you get a virus format the drive and open your cd drive put in your OS disk and click install.

PC parts also have warranty's, many motherboards have trouble shoot features to tell you exactly what is wrong.

As for "a console is a better option if being used exclusively for gaming" I fail to see really what other a console can be used for. I mean you have netflix... but still. A gaming PC is still a PC and we are coming in on 2017 a PC fastly becoming a necessity more then ever. A lot of people work in offices, that allows them to bring their work home and finish it their. Kids need PC's for school projects and papers. If your a college student you most certainly need one. I fail to see how a console can really do any of these things. Which is just another positive about a PC. For the price of a modern laptop you can build a PC and game on it as well.


Your observations are all true. Certainly, free multiplayer is technically free, as long as we aren't jumping into the pay-to-win play-to-win debate. What one chooses to spend on virtual services is, ultimately, at the user's discretion. You can also build a low-end PC that performs similarly to a console and upgrade it whenever you'd like. The crux here is that there is no sweeping generalization for system requirements; where console platforms adapt the game to fit the system hardware, PC developers do not (and cannot) do the same. So, while you might get by on some games with a low-end system, others would be rendered completely unplayable. Generally speaking, developers try to keep up with the latest mid to low-high end specs and might only backdate the service by a couple generations. At best, new components only have a 4 year life before they are no longer viable, but the tech advances so quickly that that isn't really surprising.

There is also upgradability to consider. While you can build a budget PC for the same or a lower cost than a modern console, you end up leaving yourself no upgrade path for new games. As I said, as long as it is designed for the console, it will play on that console, but if you underspec your PC and a new game comes out that exceeds what your equipment will handle without sacrificing performance or graphical quality, there is no guarantee that you can remedy the situation with a cheap upgrade--in effect, having to scrap most of your system and build from scratch again is not outside the realm of possibility. As an anecdotal example, I'm still running a GTX 670 in my system and find it increasingly more difficult to run newer games at maximum settings. It is true that you can build a PC comparable to the console at the same price point, but what I was getting at is that its life (without upgrading) is much shorter, thereby negating the cost difference to begin with--you're only gaining the versatility for regular computing.

Building a PC isn't difficult at all. I built my own, but hell, I also repair my own electronics, tracing, soldering, and all, so you're kinda preaching to the choir . What I'm saying is that not everyone can and relatively few do; it is still a daunting task even with the internet at their disposal. Will the standard user know about bus width and hardware bottlenecking? Do they know about static discharge or that memory modules most often have to be installed in alternate pairings--or that memory isn't universally compatible, for that matter? Can a standard user adjust BIOS settings to accommodate certain hardware or optimize performance without screwing something up? Nothing is all that difficult or all that difficult to find out, but it can't really be passed off as plug-n-play, either .

Then there is maintenance that goes beyond dusting out the case periodically--which, by the way, I have known several people to forego even this. What normal user can diagnose a bad memory module, failing disk, or trace down a BSOD to overheating caused by thermal paste breakdown at the CPU or a graphical freeze to overheating at the GPU? Driver errors? Memory consumption? Storage being filled by unnecessary system files? I'm going off track with this rant . Hardware failures can also occur in a console but maintaining storage is straightforward and there isn't really any room for software errors, but nothing is outside the realm of possibility; they are, themselves, computers, after all. As I said, if it is exclusively FOR gaming--not for browsing the web, broadcasting to twitch, organizing photos and videos, watching YouTube, etc. (all those modern features that PS4 does as well,) and not for writing a research paper or compiling business data--then the console is a better choice.

Finally, I have two things to note about viruses: first, anti-virus software will not stop them all and will return false positives on some software and, second, viruses can survive a format and infect a fresh install--not many do, but they can.

*huff *huff *huff
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Posted 17 days ago

PandAndy wrote:

Your observations are all true. Certainly, free multiplayer is technically free, as long as we aren't jumping into the pay-to-win play-to-win debate. What one chooses to spend on virtual services is, ultimately, at the user's discretion. You can also build a low-end PC that performs similarly to a console and upgrade it whenever you'd like. The crux here is that there is no sweeping generalization for system requirements; where console platforms adapt the game to fit the system hardware, PC developers do not (and cannot) do the same. So, while you might get by on some games with a low-end system, others would be rendered completely unplayable. Generally speaking, developers try to keep up with the latest mid to low-high end specs and might only backdate the service by a couple generations. At best, new components only have a 4 year life before they are no longer viable, but the tech advances so quickly that that isn't really surprising.

There is also upgradability to consider. While you can build a budget PC for the same or a lower cost than a modern console, you end up leaving yourself no upgrade path for new games. As I said, as long as it is designed for the console, it will play on that console, but if you underspec your PC and a new game comes out that exceeds what your equipment will handle without sacrificing performance or graphical quality, there is no guarantee that you can remedy the situation with a cheap upgrade--in effect, having to scrap most of your system and build from scratch again is not outside the realm of possibility. As an anecdotal example, I'm still running a GTX 670 in my system and find it increasingly more difficult to run newer games at maximum settings. It is true that you can build a PC comparable to the console at the same price point, but what I was getting at is that its life (without upgrading) is much shorter, thereby negating the cost difference to begin with--you're only gaining the versatility for regular computing.

Building a PC isn't difficult at all. I built my own, but hell, I also repair my own electronics, tracing, soldering, and all, so you're kinda preaching to the choir . What I'm saying is that not everyone can and relatively few do; it is still a daunting task even with the internet at their disposal. Will the standard user know about bus width and hardware bottlenecking? Do they know about static discharge or that memory modules most often have to be installed in alternate pairings--or that memory isn't universally compatible, for that matter? Can a standard user adjust BIOS settings to accommodate certain hardware or optimize performance without screwing something up? Nothing is all that difficult or all that difficult to find out, but it can't really be passed off as plug-n-play, either .

Then there is maintenance that goes beyond dusting out the case periodically--which, by the way, I have known several people to forego even this. What normal user can diagnose a bad memory module, failing disk, or trace down a BSOD to overheating caused by thermal paste breakdown at the CPU or a graphical freeze to overheating at the GPU? Driver errors? Memory consumption? Storage being filled by unnecessary system files? I'm going off track with this rant . Hardware failures can also occur in a console but maintaining storage is straightforward and there isn't really any room for software errors, but nothing is outside the realm of possibility; they are, themselves, computers, after all. As I said, if it is exclusively FOR gaming--not for browsing the web, broadcasting to twitch, organizing photos and videos, watching YouTube, etc. (all those modern features that PS4 does as well,) and not for writing a research paper or compiling business data--then the console is a better choice.

Finally, I have two things to note about viruses: first, anti-virus software will not stop them all and will return false positives on some software and, second, viruses can survive a format and infect a fresh install--not many do, but they can.

*huff *huff *huff



"The crux here is that there is no sweeping generalization for system requirements; where console platforms adapt the game to fit the system hardware, PC developers do not (and cannot) do the same. So, while you might get by on some games with a low-end system, others would be rendered completely unplayable."
You can go to any Steam game and click requirements. They will give you the minimum requirements and the recommended requirements. On top of that you can also go in game and change anything you want. If you have a 5 year old computer you can still play modern games just like any console. The games will even optimize themselves based on your systems hardware.

For example "The Division" which is a modern game and with good graphics minimum requirement is a GTX 560. That's a mid ranged GPU which would fall under the "Price to performance tier" and it launched in 2011, nearly 6 years ago for less then $200 at the time. That is neither "mid to low-high end specs" it is also more then "a couple generations" ago that's 5 generations.

"At best, new components only have a 4 year life before they are no longer viable"
As mentioned above, still tho I'm not an expert but if Ubisoft and Steam both agree that's the minimum the game needs who am I to disagree?

"There is also upgradability to consider. While you can build a budget PC for the same or a lower cost than a modern console, you end up leaving yourself no upgrade path for new games. As I said, as long as it is designed for the console, it will play on that console, but if you underspec your PC and a new game comes out that exceeds what your equipment will handle without sacrificing performance or graphical quality"
If your building a PC on a console budget your not going out for a high end AMD or a Intel i7. Seeing as which each generation have pretty much both. That seems like a upgrade path to me, along with the fact you can upgrade ram if need be or even a graphics card. All seem like reasonable upgrade paths to me. Speak of which don't console games have a hard time hitting 1080p or even 60fps? those both seem like a performance/graphic sacrifice When I think 60fps I don't thing a max of 60 fps I think of now less then 60fps.

"there is no guarantee that you can remedy the situation with a cheap upgrade--in effect, having to scrap most of your system and build from scratch again is not outside the realm of possibility. As an anecdotal example, I'm still running a GTX 670 in my system and find it increasingly more difficult to run newer games at maximum settings " That's hardware from 2012, You are making the personal choice to max out a game at a loss of performance. You have the option of lowering settings slightly to achieve better performance yet you dont. Also games are developed for the high setting. Ultra/maxed out is just an added bonus for people who have PC's capable of running it.

"If is true that you can build a PC comparable to the console at the same price point, but what I was getting at is that its life (without upgrading) is much shorter, thereby negating the cost difference to begin with--you're only gaining the versatility for regular computing." You built a computer in 2012 (at least component wise) It's nearly 2017 the part is nearly 5 years old which has been typical span of a console.

Let's say a person #1 has a console for 5 years. they paid a flat $500 for the console. Person #2 builds a PC, the cost $750 flat. Person 1 & 2 both buy 1 game every other month. Over the course of the 5 years both have purchased the game 30 games.

Person 1 spent $60 on each game and paid a total of $1,800 for the games.
Person 2 spent $40 on each game and paid a total of $1,200 for the games as they are cheaper on PC.

Person 1 also had to pay $40 a year for multiplayer spending a combined total of $2,500 for the console, games and multiplayer.
Person 2 only paid $1,950 for the PC, games, and multiplayer was free.

Yes, yes horrible example I know. Really didn't know how to word it but even if the PC cost 50% more up front it was still cheaper in the end.

"What I'm saying is that not everyone can and relatively few do"
But they can, there is active forums, and many Youtube channels out there more then willing to help them. It also makes it a lot easier as PC's are repairable (granted to an extent based on damage). It's a good skill to have and it really instills a sense of pride since you created that. You also have the chance to repair it. If you wanna compare damaged console to damaged PC the PC even fairs better there as you still have the ability to fix it where a console is broken (short of needing new thermal paste) if it gets damaged.

"Will the standard user know about bus width and hardware bottleneck? Do they know about static discharge or that memory modules most often have to be installed in alternate pairings--or that memory isn't universally compatible, for that matter? Can a standard user adjust BIOS settings to accommodate certain hardware or optimize performance without screwing something up?"
Forums can help you figure out if your components will bottleneck. PCpartpicker.com for compatibility issues. As far as I know most BIOS's are smart enough to optimize themselves. However short of XMP overclocking your ram I don't really see why you would need to optimize anything in the BIOS. Motherboards often included CPU overclocking software built in that will stress test the system for you to figure out your maximum overclock and core voltage.

"Nothing is all that difficult or all that difficult to find out, but it can't really be passed off as plug-n-play, either"
Fair point but in most case (pun not intended) they really shouldn't have much difficulty as Sata will only connect to Sata, fan headers can only connect to fan headers, etc short the Fpanel or IO shield... I hate those IO shields.

"Then there is maintenance that goes beyond dusting out the case periodically--which, by the way, I have known several people to forego even this. What normal user can diagnose a bad memory module, failing disk, or trace down a BSOD to overheating caused by thermal paste breakdown at the CPU or a graphical freeze to overheating at the GPU? Driver errors? Memory consumption? " Most motherboard are capable of self diagnosing themselves. You can buy those little speakers that will beep X times and tell you that a member stick has failed. They even have those new fancy ones that will simply display a code on the motherboard and you can look it up.
HD's are really good at letting you know in advance they are failing. Specifically SSD's.
Thermal paste lasts a long time tho If your system has bad thermal paste due to age then you would notice CPU temps rising over time in MSI After burner or any other system monitoring software.
The GPU will drop the core clock to protect itself if the temps get to high. Only real time I could see this being a problem is if they do not dust the case regularly or they force a overclock that is to high and lock their fan speed to like 10% if your graphics card sounds like a 747 that's a pretty clear sign its getting to hot. Drivers can be a problem but AMD and Nvidia are both good at releasing driver updates regularly to fix said problem. Memory leaks can be obvious as well Ctrl-Alt-Del and see which process is taking up an insane amount of ram and close it.

"Storage being filled by unnecessary system files?"
While I don't recommend it most antivirus offer clean up utilities worst case something bad happens and you simply restore from a back up or just buy a new HD. Valid point tho

"Hardware failures can also occur in a console but maintaining storage is straightforward and there isn't really any room for software errors"
http://ps4daily.com/2015/03/ps4-update-bricks-gamers-console-sony-wants-150-to-fix-it/
Actually had a PS4 when this happened

"As I said, if it is exclusively FOR gaming--not for browsing the web, broadcasting to twitch, organizing photos and videos, watching YouTube, etc. (all those modern features that PS4 does as well,)"
It can however surfing the web with a virtual keyboard isn't that fun and its more of a add on feature then a dedicated feature the console was built around. It offers it but at the sacrifice of performance and the time it takes to manual enter each letter one at a time on said virtual keyboard. As for Twitch the features it can use are very limited you will often get low image quality uploaded and it will have a significant impact on the games performance and latency. As for YouTube its offered on virtually every electronic device.

"Finally, I have two things to note about viruses: first, anti-virus software will not stop them all and will return false positives on some software and, second, viruses can survive a format and infect a fresh install--not many do, but they can"
Theoretically consoles can get viruses its less likely but its very much a possibility. Any device connected to the internet can get infect if someone see's it as a profitable target.
With common sense most people can avoid viruses. If you wanted to increase your protection you could even sandbox your web browser for added protection. Only downloading software from the manufacturers own site can also limit your possibility of running into a virus. Many virus companies go after those hard to get viruses as it gives them a chance to boast how their product can protect you. I remember Norton bragging about defeating some nasty bug that only infect about 20 computers. The virus was on a State owned network and it was advanced but places like that like to target these high end bugs for the publicity.

" *huff *huff *huff "
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Posted 17 days ago


Spoiler tags are wonderful for not having to unquote everything!
I'm not bashing PC by any means, but I do think that for the purpose of strictly gaming, the console is the better deal since you will never (likely) have to tick down settings to play for the life of the system "as-is," while you'll probably be lowering settings on the PC over time. Have both, though, because its definitely more satisfying to play MMORPGs on a PC but the simple controls that ignore the phrases "controller support" and "key binding" are pleasant, too.

My PC was actually built in 2010 , it just gets new parts along the way. The only thing that is still the same as when I built it is the case, fans, and one of the disks, but that is my point--following an upgrade path, even if behind up-to-date components, takes away any favor towards PC in cost. Between my PS3 and PS4, I have only changed the HDDs out for SSDs, but the PC that started out as a $700 build now probably has about $2,500 in it over the course of 6 years and will get another $600+ when the price of the 1070/1080 drops and Summit Ridge processors debut. Comparing the two, it's not hard to decide which was the better value for that stretch of time, but I use both, so it's really "whatever" .

Go play Overwatch, lol.
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Posted 17 days ago

PandAndy wrote:
Spoiler tags are wonderful for not having to unquote everything!
I'm not bashing PC by any means, but I do think that for the purpose of strictly gaming, the console is the better deal since you will never (likely) have to tick down settings to play for the life of the system "as-is," while you'll probably be lowering settings on the PC over time. Have both, though, because its definitely more satisfying to play MMORPGs on a PC but the simple controls that ignore the phrases "controller support" and "key binding" are pleasant, too.

My PC was actually built in 2010 , it just gets new parts along the way. The only thing that is still the same as when I built it is the case, fans, and one of the disks, but that is my point--following an upgrade path, even if behind up-to-date components, takes away any favor towards PC in cost. Between my PS3 and PS4, I have only changed the HDDs out for SSDs, but the PC that started out as a $700 build now probably has about $2,500 in it over the course of 6 years and will get another $600+ when the price of the 1070/1080 drops and Summit Ridge processors debut. Comparing the two, it's not hard to decide which was the better value for that stretch of time, but I use both, so it's really "whatever" .

Go play Overwatch, lol.


I knew you would be back I like to upgrade mine when I get the chance


I enjoy the build/researching more then the final product. My i5 6600 is only about a year old works perfectly fine and I'm honestly considering dropping back down to a x99 or a Zen chip when they release. I also wanna get a new motherboard tho during this Black Friday but I don't know if I should just get a motherboard that fits the color theme of my new case (ditched my old one a few weeks ago) or get a x99 and what not or wait for the Zen chips to launch. I also wanna replace ... well everything and get a water cooler and make a custom loop a water block for my graphics card..

It's a serious addiction

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Posted 17 days ago
Don't play my ps4 enough to want to upgrade.
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ninjitsuko wrote:

It's not so much the "year" of the model but what features are part of the model lineup. There are more HDR 10/4K models in 2016 than last year. Most 2015 models were HDR 8 (which PS4 Pro will not register as having "HDR" because it requires HDR 10). On my Samsung television, I thought I had mistakenly bought an HDR 8 model when it was because you have to manually "activate" HDR for the HDMI source in question (the PS4 Pro).

And yeah, a lot of people think that if their TV was sold to them with 4K that they have HDR. The issue is that it depends on which version of HDR their TV has. This year's models should say something along the lines of "Ultra 4K Premium" or "4K HDR" (for Sony televisions, they decided not to use the "Premium" logo on their devices). It's a tricky scenario and it's because some companies are okay with following guidelines to obtain "certification" (the ability to use the "Premium" logo for HDR/4K as having met the required 10-bit gamut).

I have a PSVR, indeed. So far, the games are a bit along the lines of casual play - there are one or two that I have that you can easily sit down and play for an hour or two; just that most of the games for PSVR are 15-45 minute long "adventures" or "casual games". I knew that the games wouldn't be too spectacular at first glance, so it isn't much of a surprise. I am, however, eagerly waiting for Resident Evil 7 (which supports PSVR).


they stated that it's HDR10 .. i think some LG has Dolby Vison which is also HDR.. but it's not compatible with the PS4s' HDR

i think xbox one s also using HDR10..

samsung listed their HDR10 as HDR1000

PSVR looks like it's similar to the playstation move-- for short session only pretty much

when i'm using my audo headset for about 1-2 hours i'm starting to sweat and feel uncomfortable around the temporal areas

so i can't imagine having the vr headset + audio headset+ holding move controllers
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Posted 17 days ago

AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:
they stated that it's HDR10 .. i think some LG has Dolby Vison which is also HDR.. but it's not compatible with the PS4s' HDR

i think xbox one s also using HDR10..

samsung listed their HDR10 as HDR1000


Yeah, I honestly think it's the Dolby Vision conflict on a software level that's causing some LG televisions not to register as having HDR for the PS4 Pro. Sony has been quite open (in FAQs and interviews) that it has no plans to support Dolby Vision in the Pro; but, the issue is that television manufacturers need to adjust their software to "register" having HDR 10 to external devices that aren't responsive to "Dolby Vision" as an input type. As for the Xbox One S (I have a standard Xbox One, didn't bother to wait for the One S), it does require the HDR10 profile. The naming of HDR10 can be confusing. I've seen things like:

- "HDR Premium" (most common)
- "UHD Color"
- "Ultra HD Deep Color"
- "HDR" (see below for comment)
- "High Dynamic Range" (this is the most confusing becuase just because it has HDR doesn't mean it's the latest and greatest gamut range)


AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:
PSVR looks like it's similar to the playstation move-- for short session only pretty much

when i'm using my audo headset for about 1-2 hours i'm starting to sweat and feel uncomfortable around the temporal areas

so i can't imagine having the vr headset + audio headset+ holding move controllers


I used to use Playstation Move for quite a while, guess it's a bit different for me (having a Wii probably encouraged my stamina for such things).
The Playstation VR is likely to be reasonable to play for longer periods of time later on in its development. But that's only if (big if) developers actually focus on it as being "a thing". If more developers push out games like "Resident Evil 7" or "Star Trek Bridge Crew" that have a reasonable design for longer gameplay, it'll work out.

I've been the type to wear headphones for hours on end (I love music, play the bass guitar, and listen to music nearly endlessly). It also depends on the game, how much interaction is required, and how the controls function. Some games require you to move your head for visual controls (looking around and "moving" in that direction) - this gets exhausting in specific games.
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Posted 16 days ago , edited 16 days ago

ninjitsuko



i think LG and Vizio are the only ones supporting Dolby Vision--

some owners stated that their LG tvs actually support both HDR10 and Dolby vision

i bought a lot of move compatible games since i thought they are good as party games on special events -- but most people stopped playing after 10-15 minutes

i don't have a lot of gamers in my extended family or circle of friends


btw

PS4 Pro is now $360 !
it's available on Amazon and Target for $360

too bad i've decided to get PS4 slim instead-- since i can get it for $170-$20 (after cash back+rewards+sellback)

*use the TECH promo code during check out at Target to get the price down to $360


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LOP8EZC/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&th=1



http://www.target.com/p/playstation-4-pro-1tb-console/-/A-51610033#sn-51610033?clkid=4468e6acN45b4a6780d9b0cba34b50d88&lnm=79373&afid=Slickdeals+LLC&ref=tgt_adv_xasd0002


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Posted 15 days ago

AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:



i think LG and Vizio are the only ones supporting Dolby Vision--

some owners stated that their LG tvs actually support both HDR10 and Dolby vision

i bought a lot of move compatible games since i thought they are good as party games on special events -- but most people stopped playing after 10-15 minutes

i don't have a lot of gamers in my extended family or circle of friends


Yeah, it's very likely that the LG television does support both (really, they're just "standards" - not so much difference between HDR10 and Dolby Vision); however, it's likely that LG's firmware doesn't register as having HDR10 and that's what causes the confusion with the PS4 Pro. It's just like with my Samsung television, it supports HDR10 - but you have to tell the television that you want to broadcast to that particular input device that you have HDR available (by turning HDR mode on).

PSVR is similar; great for showing off "the future of technology" and all of that jazz. The thing is that the games are pretty short right now because people don't know what kind of demographic that PSVR players are looking for. More "serious" games are due to be out in the next six to eight months, so that's one way to see if the wider demographic will still appeal to PSVR users. Right now it's still a "work in progress" and purchasing it at this time was clearly an "early adopter" logic.


AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:
btw

PS4 Pro is now $360 !
it's available on Amazon and Target for $360


Eh, I've had my PS4 Pro since launch. A spare $30-40 wasn't going to make me wait. I've actually really been enjoying Watch Dogs 2 on it.


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Posted 15 days ago

AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:

btw

PS4 Pro is now $360 !
it's available on Amazon and Target for $360



Oh! You were a day late.. ^_^;; I just couldn't resist & just bought the PS4 Pro, seeing that there's no sale at all...So far, I'm still grasping the PS4 interface... it's all new to me ^_^;; but I'm hoping to get a Rise of Tomb Raider on sale at Black Friday.. Crossing my fingers for it to be $35.
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Posted 15 days ago

ninjitsuko wrote:

Yeah, it's very likely that the LG television does support both (really, they're just "standards" - not so much difference between HDR10 and Dolby Vision); however, it's likely that LG's firmware doesn't register as having HDR10 and that's what causes the confusion with the PS4 Pro. It's just like with my Samsung television, it supports HDR10 - but you have to tell the television that you want to broadcast to that particular input device that you have HDR available (by turning HDR mode on).

PSVR is similar; great for showing off "the future of technology" and all of that jazz. The thing is that the games are pretty short right now because people don't know what kind of demographic that PSVR players are looking for. More "serious" games are due to be out in the next six to eight months, so that's one way to see if the wider demographic will still appeal to PSVR users. Right now it's still a "work in progress" and purchasing it at this time was clearly an "early adopter" logic.


Eh, I've had my PS4 Pro since launch. A spare $30-40 wasn't going to make me wait. I've actually really been enjoying Watch Dogs 2 on it.


HDR10 vs Dolby Vision

i think it comes down to royalties-- sony and microsoft didn't like it so they are sticking with HDR10 which is an open format? or something?

PS4 pro for $360 deal went buy pretty quick -- since new customers can take advantage of the price drop along with coupons and benefits

i think there were a few of them got the system for $241 ? so $360- cashbacks, coupons + coupons, etc..

i think some representatives who didn't know better allowed him/her to stack

so they got a PS4 PRO at a cheaper price than the PS4 slim!



rubeetora wrote:

Oh! You were a day late.. ^_^;; I just couldn't resist & just bought the PS4 Pro, seeing that there's no sale at all...So far, I'm still grasping the PS4 interface... it's all new to me ^_^;; but I'm hoping to get a Rise of Tomb Raider on sale at Black Friday.. Crossing my fingers for it to be $35.


where you bought the system from? bestbuy will refund you $40 if you asked them to check the price and price match

i heard amazon is giving people problems--

if you bought it with a credit card that has price rewind of sort (pretty much when the price of the items you paid for dropped in price within 60 days of purchased they will credit you back the difference)

as for rise of tomb raider 20th anniversary edition

i think wal-mart or target? or maybe best buy (can't remember) will have the system on sale for $35 on thurdday night

sale will begin at 6PM in store

and 12AM on Thursday online

i'll just order what i want online and have them ship the system, sshd, games, accessories to me via mail that way i'll be done with black friday shopping without having to deal with the crowds and traffic

if you got a new PS4 pro-- at least your stock HDD can be a little bit faster now due to SATA III

the difference is minimal for SSDs though

those new Seagate Firecuba SSHDs are the #1 best selling item at the moment

500GB is not enough storage space when even physical games need 25-50GB of HDD space..
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Posted 15 days ago

AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:

HDR10 vs Dolby Vision

i think it comes down to royalties-- sony and microsoft didn't like it so they are sticking with HDR10 which is an open format? or something?



Something like that. Dolby Vision requires a specific, proprietary chip to be installed on the device that is registering as an input device. Without that chip installed, Dolby Vision will not be "triggered" on the television. It isn't like HDR where you basically have to meet a few requirements, no special chip installed. The requirements are basic for that "HDR Premium" label:

- Resolution has to be a minimum of 2,840 x 2,160
- Has to have 10-bit color depth (this is the "HDR10" versus the 8-bit depth of "HDR8")
- Must cover a minimum of 90% of P3 colors
- Minimum dynamic range (1,000 nits of brightness and less than 0.05 nits black level OR more than 540 nits brightness and less than 0.0005 nits black level are the only two options to meet this minimum requirement).

Meeting these requirements with your own hardware is fairly easy for a manufacturer, much easier than paying Dolby for access to proprietary chips that can broadcast to Dolby Vision. Like I said, royalties was around the idea - seeing as they'd have to pay Dolby for rights/access to those chips and work around it (with their own hardware).
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Posted 14 days ago

LosingHope wrote:


PandAndy wrote:
Spoiler tags are wonderful for not having to unquote everything!
I'm not bashing PC by any means, but I do think that for the purpose of strictly gaming, the console is the better deal since you will never (likely) have to tick down settings to play for the life of the system "as-is," while you'll probably be lowering settings on the PC over time. Have both, though, because its definitely more satisfying to play MMORPGs on a PC but the simple controls that ignore the phrases "controller support" and "key binding" are pleasant, too.

My PC was actually built in 2010 , it just gets new parts along the way. The only thing that is still the same as when I built it is the case, fans, and one of the disks, but that is my point--following an upgrade path, even if behind up-to-date components, takes away any favor towards PC in cost. Between my PS3 and PS4, I have only changed the HDDs out for SSDs, but the PC that started out as a $700 build now probably has about $2,500 in it over the course of 6 years and will get another $600+ when the price of the 1070/1080 drops and Summit Ridge processors debut. Comparing the two, it's not hard to decide which was the better value for that stretch of time, but I use both, so it's really "whatever" .

Go play Overwatch, lol.


I knew you would be back I like to upgrade mine when I get the chance


I enjoy the build/researching more then the final product. My i5 6600 is only about a year old works perfectly fine and I'm honestly considering dropping back down to a x99 or a Zen chip when they release. I also wanna get a new motherboard tho during this Black Friday but I don't know if I should just get a motherboard that fits the color theme of my new case (ditched my old one a few weeks ago) or get a x99 and what not or wait for the Zen chips to launch. I also wanna replace ... well everything and get a water cooler and make a custom loop a water block for my graphics card..

It's a serious addiction



They journey is addicting, lol! Thanks to you reminding me that my equipment is getting out of date I had to go and order a 1070 and a new case!

I'm basically up-to-date now until I can get some solid benchmarks on the first Zen processors next year to decide if I want to stick with AMD or switch to Intel.

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