Post Reply Survivors Guilt
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Posted 21 days ago , edited 20 days ago
So another Remembrance Day has come and gone . And yet again we honour those who have given of themselves to the country they loved so dearly. Their service is one that should never be forgotten nor mocked. For those that serve it is an honour, a privilege. But it is not without it's burdens, not without it's costs.

Sure we can count the those who fell on the field of battle , of the injuries of those who made it back. Of the costs of rebuilding and such things. But even in these modern times we fail sometimes to realise the wounds of war go deeper then the skin. That the guilt of being one of those of who leave the battlefield alive is as real injury as a missing limb. Indeed worse since some do not sympathise with an injury that is not readily apparent. They see a soldier who outwardly looks fine and they accept this cheery lie.

Guy Chapdelaine, the Chaplain-General of the Canadian Forces however is not one of these people. And he realises that sometimes not all wounds heal with time. That the stress, the pain, and inner turmoil is more then some can bear. And to them the only recourse is death by their own hand.

Some of us refuse to acknowledge such things, indeed we attach a social stigma to those that commit suicide. In this atheists and theists seem in agreement.

But I ask you this do you know what real pain is,what real guilt is. Most of you look at the names engrave on the memorials and think little. They're just an endless column of names to you, names without meaning. But to some those names mean a lot, they had friends. Friends who wonder why they lived and the name on the memorial died. What gave them the right to live and the others to die. I mean they're nothing special really, they're just an average person, the other was a parent, a spouse, etc. And thus the other's life should mean more then theirs. And yet here they stand and the other is just a name on a memorial.

And yet they stand. And having served return home to a country that does not provide the help they need. Indeed goes out of it's way not to help. We owe them and yet we are failing them, I ask why?
Posted 21 days ago
2deep4me
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Posted 21 days ago
I gotta say that I don't fully under stand the soldier's perspective on this issue. But having performed CPR on a 20 year old, a kid 3 years younger than me, that we didn't get back after 2 and a half hours of compressions and breaths. Sitting there at the airway looking into those dead eyes and realizing just what him being 20 years old sort of meant.

I feel like I have a small idea.
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Posted 20 days ago , edited 20 days ago

ZenZaku wrote:

I gotta say that I don't fully under stand the soldier's perspective on this issue. But having performed CPR on a 20 year old, a kid 3 years younger than me, that we didn't get back after 2 and a half hours of compressions and breaths. Sitting there at the airway looking into those dead eyes and realizing just what him being 20 years old sort of meant.

I feel like I have a small idea.


I know, all their potential wasted on such a random throw of the dice.

They call you a hero, decorate you with shiny bits of metal and silk. Fanfare at the airport when the plane touches down. And under the shining sun you salute and offer your condolences for the families of your fallen friends. At night though you know it to be a lie. A hero would have saved more then his own sorry skin. A part of you knows that's an insane and self destructive path to take but you take it anyway. No one said sanity, reality, and actual guilt had anything to do with what is racing through one's head.

And while I can not say I fully understand the process that drives a survivor to the kind of place were only death seems the only escape I can perhaps empathise with it. After all I like so many others have survived that baptism by fire . And while it did not destroy me I can not claim to have walked away unchanged.

Others however were more then changed, and I wish we did more to help them.
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Posted 20 days ago , edited 20 days ago
They say time heals all wounds but not when people carry those wounds with them but I don't believe they should just drop them and forget about it. It would be a disservice to those who served and fought for the things they believed in. I think that people should be more respectful of those whose views differ from theirs and learn how to not cast judgement and labels so hastily or at all when they encounter opposing views and people with different beliefs.

Unlike the Feminist Slogan "Listen and Believe." I try to say "Listen and Try to Understand."
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Posted 20 days ago

Adjacent-Taurus wrote:

They say time heals all wounds but not when people carry those wounds with them but I don't believe they should just drop them and forget about it. It would be a disservice to those who served and fought for the things they believed in. I think that people should be more respectful of those whose views differ from theirs and learn how to not cast judgement and labels so hastily or at all when they encounter opposing views and people with different beliefs.

Unlike the Feminist Slogan "Listen and Believe." I try to say "Listen and Understand."


And yet we are, and I believe it to be best summed up by Kennedy's famous words " Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country." And if the sorry state of most Veteran Affairs Offices across the first world say anything it's that those who serve matter nothing to their country.
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