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Post Reply how is college life like? I am curious as a soon to be freshman
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25 / F
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Posted 4 days ago , edited 4 days ago
You need to realize that all you did in school was not even close to what you need to do. They're just giving you a bit of the stuff you need to know in lectures and most of it you need to understand yourself with reading lots of books, research etc. Get used to your library, you'll be almost living there.

I'm an optimist but man, it will never be the way you imagined it to be. And with that I mean it in good and bad ways.
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Posted 4 days ago
Most of these comments scare me but I can't wait!!
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Posted 4 days ago , edited 4 days ago
When we were in junior high, we watched Disney Channel sitcoms and High School Musical thinking that high school was going to be so teen-cool, independent, and FUN!
When we were in high school, we watched college scenes in movie/TV shows, thinking it was either our big chance to be Mature and Independent, or it was a nonstop no-ID Party Central with no sleep, bedtimes or parents, where the beer flowed in rivers, woohoo!...

Grass. Greener.
College is still in how you deal with it, and that takes character and a certain amount of Vision-Thing. It depends on how willing YOU are to point yourself in some direction, and it might be a good idea during the high-school Senior Slump to start figuring a few strategies out now.
You won't change your personality by getting a new hair color or telling everyone you're coming Out, but you can start to get an independent-identity sense of how you want people to think of you by the time the Twenty-Somethings hit.

(Oh, and not to nitpick, but they emphasize good grammar and essay-writing skills.
Like, the difference between "How is it?" and "What is it like?" )
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19 / F / Denver, Colorado
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Posted 4 days ago
I go to college in Denver and it's honestly just a lot of work. Sure there are a lot of people and more diversity but to me it's just more school and longer essays
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24 / M / Northern California
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Posted 4 days ago
Create the (college) life that you want for yourself. Put effort into making it a positive experience.
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17 / M / Earth
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Posted 4 days ago

yuummmmy wrote:

Most of these comments scare me but I can't wait!!


I agree
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27 / M / Louisville, KY
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Posted 4 days ago
If you're going into engineering be prepared to lack sleep and social life. It's pretty brutal. Calculus every day for 1.5 hours, 8+ hours of homework per week (sometimes that is just one class), etc. It was worth it though. I had a job since I was a sophomore in my field of study (Computer Engineering & Computer Science) and once I graduated I got a 60% salary promotion. Just don't go to college for some stupid major (there are a LOT of stupid majors), unless you want to be a minimum wage worker for life.
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26 / F / Overlord's Castle
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Posted 4 days ago
Depends.

Grad school sucked. No life. Slave to the school. Will to live slowly slipping away.

Undergrad =
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30 / M
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Posted 4 days ago
If you live in a dorm you're going to learn that people are $!#%ing weird, and disgusting.

No, really.

You're going to learn a lot more about other people's sex lives, personal hygiene (or lack thereof) and other bizarre quirks than you'd care to, because at the end of the day there's really just no privacy in a dormitory.

As for college stories.. I don't know. I feel I have so many I wouldn't even know where to start.
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29 / M / São Paulo
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Posted 3 days ago , edited 3 days ago
Introduction:

I don’t know what do you really want to let us explain, but I know pretty much how it works in Brazil which, obviously, is not a standard by any means. BUT I got on one of the most prestigious colleges in Brazil, called PUC/SP. It is a catholic university. Also, as I am going to start my doctorate in 2017 in USP (Universidade de São Paulo) I think I can share some facts. I am going to write a lot, so I am going to structure it as a FAQ.

Just pay attention that I am a student which has made its course in a university in Latin America around the 2007’s. My graduation path is not remarkable except on my social skills. Also, I was a model student on my high school, but it was not quite that fact that really mattered on the professional path. I had to start from scratch when referring to the labor market and teaching.

So my experience is a double standard for a peripheral experience in a peripheral country in a peripheral profession such as being a Portuguese, literature and English teacher in a foreign country like Brazil. So, read it with a pack of salt on your mouth, because it is going to hurt A LOT. On your guts! It is guaranteed.

So let’s begin the spectacle!

Getting in touch with others:

This is key for future reference in curriculum depending on the area you’re expecting to go. On education this is crucial. Also, on the first semester it is real cool to get with other students and dust off the past experiences on high school. For me, at least, college was fundamentally important on my growth as a person. It is: for the good and for the bad. Just remember that you’re going to work as soon as college finishes. I, particularly, had not noticed the time passing and I suffered severe consequences on the outcome of my last two years. I hadn’t flunked, but I was so dropped into depression that I would consider I almost did it. See next item to understand.

Friends x responsibilities:

DO NOT NEGLECT YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES. Seem pretty dull and obnoxious, but it is NOT. Let me explain why: a. college is different from school in two main factors: work and evaluation; b. Be very strict about deadlines and more than everything: context, evaluation and teachers tend to be the difficult part.

Useful advice:


a. Never pair with idiotic friends or never try to start a debate with another group of students to try to convince for other points. At least, not in the sense of a traditional debate. People usually get very pissed off and offended when you start debating very specific subjects. Leave it to post-graduation.

b. Reading usually is not the only thing on your goal, but to be very strict to the objectives of the discipline. Study here should be guided.

c. Do not try to read every book you research on the whole content. Basic thing from manuals, but you have to focus on very specific objectives.

d. Going around the library and cutting class can be both very good and very bad for you. If you are going to do your own research program yourself to do so as efficiently as possible.

e. If you want to go on a post-graduation or doctorate it is NECESSARY to have a focus. Mine was always literature. So I could get on my doctorate. Most of my colleagues even though didn’t have such a difficult time at graduation couldn’t get to the next step on this kind of education.

Background before graduation and after the masters:



Research:

As stated above: always have clear goals and clear standards for what you are researching.

Unorganized places need very strict and organized students:

Well, this one is important and very odd, especially for you English-speaking people of developed countries, but universities around here tend to be VERY UNORGANIZED places. ESPECIALLY, when regarding graduation courses on languages and humanities. Let me explain it very plainly and simple:

a. I had 200 hours + on class observation and I handed all my paperwork to conclude graduation, but the faculty has LOST my papers and I had not any leftovers or copies to refill them with. As a result I spent another year redoing all over again the observations and could not go to work in a paid job.

Methodologies, learning, conflicts and researching…. What should I do about my curricula?

Do you hate teachers who are very traditional, chatty or love long and complicated explanations? Brace yourself! Teachers usually do not have didactic skills around here due to lack of pedagogical vision. They are keen observers on their on subjects, very good on theory and long essays, but they are obliged to give classes even though they have pursued this career as researchers. Be attentive to always go to the source material and ask questions directly to them. Also, did you make friends? Keep doing friends along the course you’ll need serious help on graduation. After you got into the masters or doctorate as the subjects get specific and you have fewer students in class you can breathe a little.

Conclusions:

It is a thrilling experience and very grateful, but you have to maintain focus. College tends to give us too much liberty and, then, we can screw ourselves on the process. So, depending on everything you do it can be pretty good or a face fuck experience. As for me it was a very mixed bag, but my love for literature, language, teaching and theory has given me strength to keep up with it. Also, I am pursuing a career as a college teacher, so my path is very different from the standard.

Some last advice:

Do not freak out. Lol
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33 / M / Seattle
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Posted 3 days ago
It depends on what college you go to and what you are studying, as well as what degree you are pursuing. Undergraduate is a lot more relaxed as all you are really doing is attending classes and studying really hard, but at the same time you get to do a lot more things now that you are living on your own. Doing a tech-based program that meant really sitting down and trying to make sense of things.

Then at graduate school, the beginning is pretty hectic as you are squarely focused on your classes. But then things settle down later in the program when you are focused on your thesis, but that in it of itself is quite a lot of work. On top of that, you are taking on other jobs in the way of a graduate assistantship. So to simply put, college life is great, but extremely hectic depending on what you choose to study as some majors are relaxed while others are very demanding where you can't afford to be lazy.
Emtro 
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Posted 3 days ago , edited 3 days ago

Watamote4242 wrote:

I was wondering how is college life like? Do you have any interesting college stories?



Don't waste money on a university, take as many credits as you can at the local community college. Coordinate with the university you want to transfer to, making sure all credits will transfer and are required for your bachelor. Check with the university you plan to transfer to's scholarship and grants information. A lot of schools give grants to people who just got their associates to continue and finish their bachelors degree. If not, then don't bother with the associates unless it fits directly into a bachelor's program you plan to transfer from.

Accept money in this order:
1) Grant money
2) Scholarship money
3) Subsidized Loans
4) Un-subsidized Loans
5) Private Loans

Commuting a long distance is not worth it, live on campus if it is a long drive. Gas+Other costs+Damage to grades make it worth it.

Whatever you do, do not take a liberal arts degree. We have enough professional retards in this country (and world).

Good luck!
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17 / M / Earth
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Posted 3 days ago

Don't waste money on a university, take as many credits as you can at the local community college. Coordinate with the university you want to transfer to, making sure all credits will transfer and are required for your bachelor. Check with the university you plan to transfer to's scholarship and grants information. A lot of schools give grants to people who just got their associates to continue and finish their bachelors degree. If not, then don't bother with the associates unless it fits directly into a bachelor's program you plan to transfer from.

Accept money in this order:
1) Grant money
2) Scholarship money
3) Subsidized Loans
4) Un-subsidized Loans
5) Private Loans

Commuting a long distance is not worth it, live on campus if it is a long drive. Gas+Other costs+Damage to grades make it worth it.

Whatever you do, do not take a liberal arts degree. We have enough professional retards in this country (and world).

Good luck!


Thanks for the advice, I am still undecided on what I want to major in college but I know not to get a degree that doesn't pay off.
amaj12 
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23 / M / Louisiana
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Posted 3 days ago

Kira0309 wrote:

Depends.

Grad school sucked. No life. Slave to the school. Will to live slowly slipping away.



I'm constantly wishing I could visit the past version of myself so I could just punch him in the face when he thought that it would be a good idea to go to grad school....I'm so over it.
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29 / M / São Paulo
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Posted 3 days ago , edited 3 days ago
I am seeing that much of the prejudice I had with english speaking people are paying off hard in this thread.

Not that I would have expected people to like the people from what we call "humanities" around there. The same is valid for the same kind of professionals here. Especially when considering political views from the left winged or a.k.a 90% of our undergraduate students are from left wing even though they are from the higher "social stratum". Contradictions make them even more despisable for the public in general.

Also, I just want to ask:

a. What is so obnoxious with a more traditional undergraduate course? The fact that most of them are teachers?

b. I do not get the difference between a local college and a university. I know the difference relating to the spectrum of what it is: total courses, if it is going to be more focused on researching and labor market.

c. Don't you have any programs that can avoid having to take a degree on a university? College on Canada has a different meaning from university in many ways. It is much more like picking up a profession and learning it from scratch. It is much more useful than theory for most people.

d. I believe I have been solely ignored. Lol Well, at least I tried to put an interesting text. How ironic how most of these carefully crafted posts go around here. Not that I really care if someone is going to use it or not. A little bit of consideration should do fine. Well, I think I just did not got what the thread was calling for. My bad.



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