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Post Reply The Wireless Router You Are Using Right Now..
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Posted 12/8/16 , edited 9/5/17
I'm still using the dual band wireless N router

maybe it's time to upgrade since with 2.4Ghz when i turned on the microwave i'll lose connection to the router

this particular model was on sale for $120..

NETGEAR Nighthawk AC1900 Dual Band Wi-Fi Gigabit Router (R7000) with Open Source Support
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00F0DD0I6?ref%5F=pe%5F171530%5F218023880%5Fem%5F1p%5F0%5Fti&redirect=true&pldnSite=1

there was another model AC1750.. was on sale for $88 with $20 coupon it's $68

the newer AC routers are pretty big though .. some are almost 2 lbs (vs 1/2 lb )

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Posted 12/8/16 , edited 9/5/17
"upgraded" to an Asus AC 1200 for like 50 bucks. it doesn't have gigabit, but i only have an intenet speed < 70mbps so a more powerful router would make zero difference.
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Posted 12/8/16 , edited 9/5/17

namealreadytaken wrote:

"upgraded" to an Asus AC 1200 for like 50 bucks. it doesn't have gigabit, but i only have an intenet speed < 70mbps so a more powerful router would make zero difference.


if you play games online-- wireless AC will provide a more stable speed so there's no lagging and faster download speed while downloading

*no wireless speed can beat direct connection though

the wireless speed of a router and your actual internet speed are different

so even when your internet plan is only 20Mbps, 50Mbps or 100Mbps

Wireless ac at 600-900Mbps or more will be ideal (if the price is affordable)

I paid $70 for my current Wireless N router so.. if there's an AC router with faster wireless speed for the same price i'll jump on it

but trying to find a wireless router that is energy star certified is difficult
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30 / M / Clinton, NY
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Posted 12/8/16 , edited 9/5/17
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Posted 12/8/16 , edited 9/5/17

The Wireless Router You Are Using Right Now..


Nope! I don't use wireless anything.

Wait.... I lied.

I use wired router for my desktop machine. The only time I do wireless, is when I'm going to update Android on my Samsung Tab III 8...

When the update is done, I turn off the wireless connection on my hybrid wired/wireless router....
Posted 12/8/16 , edited 9/5/17
ASUS RT-AC66U I am using the 5GHz 802.11AC side of it.
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61 / M / Earth
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Posted 12/8/16 , edited 12/8/16
Ok, if anyone really thinks your router is actually sufficient, run this specific speed test; never mind the others that only test simple upload/download speeds. Speed is not throughput, and it doesn't help with bufferbloat and prioritizing different stream types to get required response to operate properly. Voip/gaming/uploading/downloading/live streaming, etc, all need to be treated differently.

This test is pretty brutal and honest and won't just spew numbers at you to make you think you have good "speed" just because those numbers are better than anyone else's.

http://www.dslreports.com/speedtest

Never mind the upload or download speeds, those aren't really the point. Well, if you have several people using your internet, then you will need more bandwidth, but what is more important is quality of service/throughput that you get with fair flow queuing with controlled delay (fq_codel). If you don't get a result like this, you have a problem that isn't going to be solved by buying yet another consumer-grade router, no matter how "fast" it is:


I once had a problem with my signal strength at my cable modem that was contributing to inconsistency. Typically you can connect to 192.168.100.1 in a web browser to look at your signal strength and see if you have a problem, too. There are usually 16 bonded channels and the "Power" column, expressed in decibels, should be as close to 0 as possible. Modems are supposed to function OK at +/- 15 db, but if you aren't within +/- 5 db, it isn't good enough; you probably need to have your signal checked by your ISP, and possibly you need to have an amplifier installed as well, even if you have to pay for it. They may give you a hard time if you are within the modem specs. (right now, my "worst" value is +1.7). If you see some channels with a ton of "uncorrectables", that's a good indication your signal is too weak.

I use an Edgerouter X from Ubiquity, which by itself is a separate wired router, in conjunction with a separate dedicated wireless AC access point for my devices that need that. I also have an 8-port gig switch to directly plug in everything else and I use cat-6 cables wherever possible which have better cross talk shielding.

I can't really recommend that the casual user should attempt to get one and set it up themselves, though. You need to have a bit of networking experience to set one up, or at least have to be able to get any needed support from the UBNT forums or the sub-reddit /r/Ubiquiti/. They don't have a help line to walk you through basic stuff. This is a commercial product meant to be installed by network professionals, but it can be done with it's simplest setup configuration using the correct wizard, if you're any good at googling to find other computer solutions. Once configured, the basic QoS setup to engage fq_codel is actually pretty easy, and that's what makes all the difference between getting those "A" ratings in the test.
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28 / M / St.Louis
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Posted 12/8/16
poj
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34 / M / outer wall, level...
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Posted 12/8/16
samsung galaxy s6.
shhhh.......dont tell verizon.
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Posted 12/8/16

asharka wrote:

I use an Edgerouter X from Ubiquity, which by itself is a separate wired router, in conjunction with a separate dedicated wireless AC access point for my devices that need that. I also have an 8-port gig switch to directly plug in everything else and I use cat-6 cables wherever possible which have better cross talk shielding.


My current configuration is a 6-switch off the wireless router. Would the extra Edgerouter X wired to the switch create less bottleneck at the wireless router?
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Posted 12/8/16 , edited 12/8/16

54bubbles wrote:
My current configuration is a 6-switch off the wireless router. Would the extra Edgerouter X wired to the switch create less bottleneck at the wireless router?


You wouldn't really want to have two routers. You would reconfigure your existing wireless router to simply be an access point. My network path is like this:

Internet coax <-> cable modem <-> ER-X router <-> switch <-> WAP

Any other hard-wired devices would plug into the switch, including the reconfigured WAP, which doesn't have anything else plugged into it.
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Posted 12/8/16

asharka wrote:

You wouldn't really want to have two routers. You would reconfigure your existing wireless router to simply be an access point. My network path is like this:

Internet coax <-> cable modem <-> ER-X router <-> switch <-> WAP

Any other hard-wired devices would plug into the switch, including the reconfigured WAP, which doesn't have anything else plugged into it.


Thanks! I see the potential problem: My router is also the WAP.
DIY IT can be a challenge when it's not part of your skillset
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Posted 12/8/16 , edited 12/8/16

54bubbles wrote:
Thanks! I see the potential problem: My router is also the WAP.


It's actually a switch, too...

That isn't necessarily a problem in simple cases when you don't have so many devices that you need an extra switch to plug them into, but only if somehow the wireless router or cable modem, etc, had fq_codel incorporated into it, which is not a common thing, at least not yet.

There are some consumer wireless router models that can have the factory firmware overwritten with an open source distribution called Openwrt. You have to do your homework before buying one of those, though, and flashing the factory setup voids any warranty with the router. It also doesn't solve the problem of needing to add a switch when you have 5 PCs to plug in at the same time, like I do.

Having a separate router and AP has some advantages. It allows you to place them each in optimal locations. It allows you to replace one without replacing the other. You don't have to take down your wired network if you reboot your WAP. And you can pick the best brand for each need if you have the $$, or reuse the router as a WAP until you can afford to get something designed better for just wireless, with more range, or even multiple WAPs that can have "roaming" coverage that automatically switches to the one with the strongest signal, if you buy the right equipment, and configure it right.

But the average home consumer isn't often going to need all of that, unless they are in a multi-story concrete-walled or a sprawling house (or in an apartment, etc...)
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29 / M / Malaysia
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Posted 12/9/16
still using a crappy tplink 740n 150mbps
coz the package i subscribe is just 10mbps [isp] , and i dont use network to share files between computer,upgrading is useless,and i also live in just a 1800 square feet 1 storey house,there is also no need for the range.

why u ask i using a crappy router when i got so much choice?
its because its cheap, AAAANNNNNNDDDD....
this tplink model is modable with custom firmware.....
and now i can create multiple ssid with difference bandwidth allocation ...

so that my session wont be interrupt when some one in the house suddenly want to become an @sshole.

the isp package here is fcking expensive as fk.....
30 mbps for 45usd per month , fcking monopolize by my country government

it does not matter how fast your router is , if the isp package u take is below your router capability .
Posted 12/9/16
I'm using a Zyxel OLT2406 GPON OLT with a Cisco 2951 router. I do have wireless enabled through access points and two switches throughout the house. It's mostly because it's my "test environment" as well as my working environment (the router and OLT were supplied by work). The Cisco access points/wireless networks and the switches are all bought by myself.

If/when I leave this company (it's likely it'll happen this year, in some way or another) I'll likely downgrade to a standard, non-commercial network rig, and switch to a standard end-user internet connection (rather than having a commercial grade optical line coming into the house directly). Most cable ISPs allow for better speeds than what I get at the moment (300 Mbps up/down), but not with the promise of uptime or being able to manage the network.
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