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Post Reply Cat or Ferret?
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27 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16

saksiss wrote:

My sister had a ferret once. Never again. Little shit kept me up all night with its screaming and during the day, biting non stop.
Thankfully the little crap died.



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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16

saksiss wrote:

My sister had a ferret once. Never again. Little shit kept me up all night with its screaming and during the day, biting non stop.
Thankfully the little crap died.


I guess you could say you... weaseled out of that predicament.



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Posted 12/9/16
I don't know much about Ferret's but I can give you plenty of advice about cats. I have had ALOT of cats. I routinely rescue cats that are homeless or are going to be put down. The first thing you need to make sure of is that you A. Have enough time to take care of them properly and B. can afford to take care of them properly. Cats have ALOT of energy and while it's true that a cat will lay around a lot they also need lots of play time. If you don't want a nutty cat then it's best to direct that energy in a positive manner and play with it. When it comes to money you need to make sure you have enough money to care for him/her properly and I don't just mean buying cat food and some toys. They'll need to be neutered or spayed if they're not already and trust me you absolutely want to neuter and spay them. It can help prevent certain cancers in females and them being in a constant cycle of heat is not easy on them. Males are just plain nasty if they're not neutered. They spray everything and it's disgusting. They'll also be a lot less aggressive. Basically they'll stay sweet kittens if you spay/neuter them at 6 months. You'll also need their vaccinations and heart worm medicine each month. Don't just assume that because they're indoors they can't get heartworms. The first time one of mine got heartworms and then CHF and died years earlier than he should have was the last. He never went outdoors a day in his life. Mosquitos do find their way indoors. He was too old to survive the insanely expensive treatment for them. Also, I find that an inside cat is a much happier cat. Nothing awaits them outdoors where I live but certain death. Owls, coyote's and cars as well as dogs and humans are all major threats to them where I live. Coyote's especially. There are NO leash laws here in the country where I live so dogs just roam wherever. Not good. You'll also need flea medicine and whatever other vet bills may pop up. If everything goes fine you'll have a nice healthy kitty with few trips to the vet but sometimes things don't always go as planned. It's a huge commitment.

If you're up for it then I'd say get two cats, especially if you want kittens. They'll play together, sleep together and keep each other entertained when you're not around to do so. Cats make wonderful companions and have just as much love for you as dogs do. They just show it a bit differently is all. I love my cats and couldn't imagine my life without them. Also watch out petting them all the way down their tails, especially when young. Some cats get this thing called petting aggression where when you pet them they'll be purring away then out of nowhere they'll get your a#$. Some claw, some bite. Cat bites are nasty btw. I've read about people having to have multiple surgeries to get rid of the bacterial. Best not to ever get bitten lol. I've only had two cats like this though so it's not a lot of cats but it does happen. Best thing to do with these is only pet around their heads and watch for warning signs. Weird twitching of their tails, flickering of the ears. You get to know your cat pretty well and will learn to read it's body language. Just make sure they're neutered and spayed. I really can't stress that enough with cats.

Oh and if you get a cat make sure you get it plenty of claw posts. I would strongly advise NOT to declaw any cat....ever. Some people don't realize that it's not just trimming their nails or removing their claws. Basically it would be like you having your fingers all cut off at their last knuckle. For every cat that I've seen do okay with declawing I've seen dozens that don't do well. They have behavioral problems, many won't use a litter box, they can be aggressive and can't properly defend themselves. It's a really nasty business and many vets won't properly explain the procedure to pet owners. They suck! Every declawed cat I've rescued except one has had so many problems that it's not even funny. It just pisses me off that some vets who still do it won't properly tell the pet owners what it is they're actually doing.

Whatever you choose I wish you luck. Either way you will have a loving companion for years to come. Good luck to you. There's a lot of good information about both ferrets and cats online. I would definitely read up first and then make up your mind.

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27 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16

TheOriginalStraynge wrote:

I don't know much about Ferret's but I can give you plenty of advice about cats. I have had ALOT of cats. I routinely rescue cats that are homeless or are going to be put down. The first thing you need to make sure of is that you A. Have enough time to take care of them properly and B. can afford to take care of them properly. Cats have ALOT of energy and while it's true that a cat will lay around a lot they also need lots of play time. If you don't want a nutty cat then it's best to direct that energy in a positive manner and play with it. When it comes to money you need to make sure you have enough money to care for him/her properly and I don't just mean buying cat food and some toys. They'll need to be neutered or spayed if they're not already and trust me you absolutely want to neuter and spay them. It can help prevent certain cancers in females and them being in a constant cycle of heat is not easy on them. Males are just plain nasty if they're not neutered. They spray everything and it's disgusting. They'll also be a lot less aggressive. Basically they'll stay sweet kittens if you spay/neuter them at 6 months. You'll also need their vaccinations and heart worm medicine each month. Don't just assume that because they're indoors they can't get heartworms. The first time one of mine got heartworms and then CHF and died years earlier than he should have was the last. He never went outdoors a day in his life. Mosquitos do find their way indoors. He was too old to survive the insanely expensive treatment for them. Also, I find that an inside cat is a much happier cat. Nothing awaits them outdoors where I live but certain death. Owls, coyote's and cars as well as dogs and humans are all major threats to them where I live. Coyote's especially. There are NO leash laws here in the country where I live so dogs just roam wherever. Not good. You'll also need flea medicine and whatever other vet bills may pop up. If everything goes fine you'll have a nice healthy kitty with few trips to the vet but sometimes things don't always go as planned. It's a huge commitment.

If you're up for it then I'd say get two cats, especially if you want kittens. They'll play together, sleep together and keep each other entertained when you're not around to do so. Cats make wonderful companions and have just as much love for you as dogs do. They just show it a bit differently is all. I love my cats and couldn't imagine my life without them. Also watch out petting them all the way down their tails, especially when young. Some cats get this thing called petting aggression where when you pet them they'll be purring away then out of nowhere they'll get your a#$. Some claw, some bite. Cat bites are nasty btw. I've read about people having to have multiple surgeries to get rid of the bacterial. Best not to ever get bitten lol. I've only had two cats like this though so it's not a lot of cats but it does happen. Best thing to do with these is only pet around their heads and watch for warning signs. Weird twitching of their tails, flickering of the ears. You get to know your cat pretty well and will learn to read it's body language. Just make sure they're neutered and spayed. I really can't stress that enough with cats.

Oh and if you get a cat make sure you get it plenty of claw posts. I would strongly advise NOT to declaw any cat....ever. Some people don't realize that it's not just trimming their nails or removing their claws. Basically it would be like you having your fingers all cut off at their last knuckle. For every cat that I've seen do okay with declawing I've seen dozens that don't do well. They have behavioral problems, many won't use a litter box, they can be aggressive and can't properly defend themselves. It's a really nasty business and many vets won't properly explain the procedure to pet owners. They suck! Every declawed cat I've rescued except one has had so many problems that it's not even funny. It just pisses me off that some vets who still do it won't properly tell the pet owners what it is they're actually doing.

Whatever you choose I wish you luck. Either way you will have a loving companion for years to come. Good luck to you. There's a lot of good information about both ferrets and cats online. I would definitely read up first and then make up your mind.



Ummm...wow! A lot of text much!
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28 / F / SC
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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16
cat
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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16
cat probably best as long as they get food and such they usually don't need much care and a litterbox unless can set up a alternative though would also likely need a scratch post so they don't scraps carpets/furniture as much. most of the time they don't require much attention compared to for example a dog. also most people prefer a female cat so they don't have to worry about spraying. their also various breeds with often distinct personalities associated with them

a ferret could also make a decent pet as well my mom has one which behaves relatively well not too sure what requirements are but food/water a cage as well as a place for it to rest in and means to make it easier to clean its mess up seem to be part of caring for a ferret. they also are quite curious animals and like exploring they can sometimes be trained to respond to basic commands like come. also can reduce the smell by removing the glands personally don't think my moms ferret smells all that much
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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16

Dogempire wrote:


octorockandroll wrote:


Dogempire wrote:

Did you just assume my species?





...Is it really assuming if you flat out have it in your name?


What if I don't identify as a dog, but I identify as a doge?



Then the other half of your name would be mispelled...

Also I'm quite certain those are the same species.
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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16
Cats; Ferrets smell horrendous and you have to keep them in a cage and let them out and a bunch of other extra hassles on top of being a good owner of any pet. Cat's are low maintenance and better cuddle buddies. Also they purr and it's uber cute <3
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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16
Get the cat. Real science done by people in actual lab coats has determined that cats are 10,000% cuter than ferrets.
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27 / M / Your friendly nei...
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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16
Chinchilla.... or a spider.
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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16

BlueOni wrote:

Get the cat. Real science done by people in actual lab coats has determined that cats are 10,000% cuter than ferrets.


^I believe it if it comes from BlueOni
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F
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Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16

thekevin4 wrote:

^I believe it if it comes from BlueOni


This and many more true facts available in my soon coming book, "Blue Oni's Big Book of Facts Vol. 1"! The quintessential fact book for your coffee table, nightstand, or bathroom!

Warning: Please do not use book to smash spiders. Blue Oni takes no responsibility for injuries or being trapped in a cocoon of webbing by a certain local super hero if you do. Also, get cats instead of ferrets. They're cuter, cleaner, smell better, and everyone's pretty much laid out all the other reasons by now. Cats: they're just better.
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F / West
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Posted 12/9/16
Obviously.
Posted 12/9/16 , edited 12/9/16
Cat. Vets are much more likely to be familiar with them, as opposed to ferrets, so cats have my vote for being the first-pet-friendly choice, of the two.
Posted 12/9/16
CATS cause they're cuter
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