Post Reply How important is politics in a military science-fiction novel?
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27 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 12/11/16
I need to know just how important politics is in a military science-fiction novel. Because I am trying with all my heart to write one and it is becoming a challenge. I am searching for some way to learn how to learn about politics but I can't find much. I just need to know is politics really important for this type of story. What do you think? Got any advice.
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Posted 12/11/16
Yes. Very much so. One thing you can do is try to consume military fantasy media like strategy rpgs or sci-fi military films and tv shows. Then again you mentioned you couldn't get through the original gundam show, so maybe the genre just isnt your thing. You can try again though, by all means. I prefer the compilation movies anyway, as they're some of the best examples of the practice of making a compilation movie. Plus they cut out goofy shit from the tv show, like the pointless crap about the gundam having to be deployed in two seperate parts and the weird as hell gunhammer.
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Posted 12/11/16

octorockandroll wrote:

Yes. Very much so. One thing you can do is try to consume military fantasy media like strategy rpgs or sci-fi military films and tv shows. Then again you mentioned you couldn't get through the original gundam show, so maybe the genre just isnt your thing. You can try again though, by all means. I prefer the compilation movies anyway, as they're some of the best examples of the practice of making a compilation movie. Plus they cut out goofy shit from the tv show, like the pointless crap about the gundam having to be deployed in two seperate parts and the weird as hell gunhammer.


Thank you.
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Posted 12/11/16

qualeshia3 wrote:


octorockandroll wrote:

Yes. Very much so. One thing you can do is try to consume military fantasy media like strategy rpgs or sci-fi military films and tv shows. Then again you mentioned you couldn't get through the original gundam show, so maybe the genre just isnt your thing. You can try again though, by all means. I prefer the compilation movies anyway, as they're some of the best examples of the practice of making a compilation movie. Plus they cut out goofy shit from the tv show, like the pointless crap about the gundam having to be deployed in two seperate parts and the weird as hell gunhammer.


Thank you.


You're welcome.
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Posted 12/11/16
Politics is the main reason for military. They pretty much go hand-in-hand, so politics should be at least part of the backstory, to make sense of the purpose of the military taking action. Without politics, the "military" would just be a group of rioting, malicious monsters - birthed to kill or harm.

I would suggest skimming through ancient politics (or at least a couple of hundred years back) where political subject matter were for the benefit of simpler results (reducing/eliminating hunger for the kingdom/region, taking over land/expanding an empire), rather than current political affairs which are heavily-focused on lobbying, social perception and lots of complicated little events in-between. Most stories (the older stuff) can pretty much give you an introduction to the development of their military.
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Posted 12/11/16
its critical. not just external politics, but internal. people wanting to move up in rank. contractors getting contracts becuase of connections.
Posted 12/12/16
Most wars happen because of political differences/disagreements.
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Posted 12/12/16
Yeahhh, why are you trying to write a military story?

Do you have a thing for military vehicles, or politics, or what?

You should write a genre because you like the genre. Even if you like stories that happen to be in that genre, that doesn't mean you like that genre.

Don't push yourself into putting things you don't like in your work. It's your work. Make it yours. I had to go through this with myself - I'm really not into fight scenes. I always just ignore the fight scenes in shows that I watch, because they don't interest me. I just figure out afterwards the basics of what happened - who got injured, who saved who, etc.
But since just about every genre story has fighting, and most fans talk about the characters as if their fighting ability is the most important thing about them (which is so stupid, and I hate people like that, but that's beside the point). So I always felt like I had to have fighting in my stories... but I don't. Now I write things that still have the things I like - royals, mysteries, complex characters, even real risk of death and things like that - but without fight scenes, because if it's boring to me when I'm writing it, it will definitely be boring to readers.
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Posted 12/12/16

LavenderMintRose wrote:

Yeahhh, why are you trying to write a military story?

Do you have a thing for military vehicles, or politics, or what?

You should write a genre because you like the genre. Even if you like stories that happen to be in that genre, that doesn't mean you like that genre.

Don't push yourself into putting things you don't like in your work. It's your work. Make it yours. I had to go through this with myself - I'm really not into fight scenes. I always just ignore the fight scenes in shows that I watch, because they don't interest me. I just figure out afterwards the basics of what happened - who got injured, who saved who, etc.
But since just about every genre story has fighting, and most fans talk about the characters as if their fighting ability is the most important thing about them (which is so stupid, and I hate people like that, but that's beside the point). So I always felt like I had to have fighting in my stories... but I don't. Now I write things that still have the things I like - royals, mysteries, complex characters, even real risk of death and things like that - but without fight scenes, because if it's boring to me when I'm writing it, it will definitely be boring to readers.



Because it's been my dream to write a novel similar to the Gundam series. I know it is difficult but I can't help it. I keep on leaning towards wanting to write it even though I am completely ignorant of it.

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Posted 12/13/16
Politics is VERY important to a military-science fiction novel, it is nearly the sole reason for action. Get in reach of former soldiers and politicians through books, social media and interview them. Take a tour to your local government, JROTC or military base visit and see what's going on. Write it from your perspective as a person living through those times. Also try getting touch with writers in that field, they may be able to give you insight into this.
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Posted 12/14/16 , edited 12/14/16

qualeshia3 wrote:




Because it's been my dream to write a novel similar to the Gundam series. I know it is difficult but I can't help it. I keep on leaning towards wanting to write it even though I am completely ignorant of it.



Why?


If military stuff isn't your thing, why do you want to write something similar to that particular series? What about that series makes you like it? You will probably find that you can come up with a way to write a story that has everything you like about the Gundam series, without being in a genre you don't like.

And if you want to write in that genre for a reason other than that you like that genre - for example, you want to impress someone else who likes that genre, or someone's told you that genre is superior to something you like more - don't. Write what you like.

It takes a lot to be independent in your tastes. It takes a lot to get over listening to some people who tell you that what you like is silly, and that this other thing is just vastly superior. But if you want to write something good, it has to come from what you like, and what you think, and what matters to you.


Also, just as a matter of living life - always ask yourself why, about everything. This is something I think modern people don't get - historic people probably didn't get it either, to be honest. But here it is: Asking "why" is not the same as challenging an idea. In fact, it's the opposite - if you really, truly believe something, it's important to constantly ask yourself why, what is the foundation of that belief? That's the best way to strengthen your relationship with your own thoughts and ideas. And that's a really important part of having thoughts and ideas, and the more you want to share your ideas, the more important it is to understand every single fiber of those ideas and why and how you believe in them. And that comes from asking why.

So I'm not challenging you, or telling you to stop believing that, when I tell you to ask yourself why. You'll only get the best possible result out of constantly asking why, in any area of life.

Edit: OOOH good example: So, that anime series I'm always rambling on about, K. It's very similar to Code Geass in a lot of ways. It's very light on military and politics stuff, but it's still very similar to Code Geass, which is still a military/politics series. Instead of a conflict between countries, the conflict is between superpowered kings within one city. The factions are much smaller, the battles are with powers, hand-to-hand, rather than with armies, but you get a lot of the same character concepts and relationships that you get in Geass even with those differences. Betrayal, two sides struggling to understand each other, a side trying to make peace between bitter enemies, knighthood and loyalty, etc.
So you can have those things without military/politics.
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Posted 12/14/16

LavenderMintRose wrote:


Why?


If military stuff isn't your thing, why do you want to write something similar to that particular series? What about that series makes you like it? You will probably find that you can come up with a way to write a story that has everything you like about the Gundam series, without being in a genre you don't like.

And if you want to write in that genre for a reason other than that you like that genre - for example, you want to impress someone else who likes that genre, or someone's told you that genre is superior to something you like more - don't. Write what you like.

It takes a lot to be independent in your tastes. It takes a lot to get over listening to some people who tell you that what you like is silly, and that this other thing is just vastly superior. But if you want to write something good, it has to come from what you like, and what you think, and what matters to you.


Also, just as a matter of living life - always ask yourself why, about everything. This is something I think modern people don't get - historic people probably didn't get it either, to be honest. But here it is: Asking "why" is not the same as challenging an idea. In fact, it's the opposite - if you really, truly believe something, it's important to constantly ask yourself why, what is the foundation of that belief? That's the best way to strengthen your relationship with your own thoughts and ideas. And that's a really important part of having thoughts and ideas, and the more you want to share your ideas, the more important it is to understand every single fiber of those ideas and why and how you believe in them. And that comes from asking why.

So I'm not challenging you, or telling you to stop believing that, when I tell you to ask yourself why. You'll only get the best possible result out of constantly asking why, in any area of life.

Edit: OOOH good example: So, that anime series I'm always rambling on about, K. It's very similar to Code Geass in a lot of ways. It's very light on military and politics stuff, but it's still very similar to Code Geass, which is still a military/politics series. Instead of a conflict between countries, the conflict is between superpowered kings within one city. The factions are much smaller, the battles are with powers, hand-to-hand, rather than with armies, but you get a lot of the same character concepts and relationships that you get in Geass even with those differences. Betrayal, two sides struggling to understand each other, a side trying to make peace between bitter enemies, knighthood and loyalty, etc.
So you can have those things without military/politics.



Yeah, It doesn't even matter anymore. I've decided to write about people struggling to survive after a gruesome world war. They're trying to get back on their feet after the world went into ruin.

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