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Post Reply Affirmative Action for the SAT
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28 / M / New York
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Posted 12/13/16


Motherfuckers.
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27 / M / Chicago
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Posted 12/13/16

HolyDrumstick wrote:


Maromi-kun wrote:

The sheer fact the SAT still exists along with its strange scoring system amazes me.


Translation: I'm afraid to offend people, but think this is stupid, but at the same time think certain people are disadvantaged, so I'll just attack a long established test/scoring system without any real information about why I think it is bad.

Answer/Question: Care to elaborate?


Really? I mean really, translating my statement of little value into something else? People shouldn't get an advantage at all, especially over a damn test whose only purpose is to see if you're ready for college. I've taken both the SAT and ACT and thats all it does, measures how ready you are. Sure it's going to be useful when you're taking a final exam, but it ain't gonna help shit if you're working on a project that forces you to think outside the box.

If the College Board's been doing this for years, good to know because I'm Asian, I had to be docked 50 points just so others can be on the same level with their bonus points.
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☆Land of sweets☆
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Posted 12/14/16
fact:
230 / 1600 = .14375 or 14.375%
50 / 1600 = .03125 or 3.125%

if SAT had a total possible score of 100 points,
an African American getting a score of 76 (a C grade) would get their grade bumped to an 90.375 (A- grade)
an Asian getting a score of 92 (an A- grade) would get their grade marked down to an 88..875 (a B+ grade).
in effect, someone getting a score of 92 would have a lower grade than someone that scored a 76. someone who can almost ace the test can be left behind by someone who barely understand enough to pass with a C-grade. just because of their ethnicity alone.
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18 / M / The Bay
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Posted 12/14/16
I want to comment on the stupidity of this, but I can't really create anything that's more than swearing...

To be fair, I'm asian, black, and white, what would they do to my scores? Do I get a grade boost, a drop, or will they apply both to my grade in the end?
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39 / Inside your compu...
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Posted 12/14/16
Speaking of "how Asians are"......

https://youtu.be/pN8E8L5c9WI

Posted 12/14/16
I suppose that honest scores are simply too much to ask for.
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32 / F
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Posted 12/14/16 , edited 12/14/16
I think it really depends on what state you live in. If you want to get into a good university as an Asian, it helps to be a resident in the state of that particular university. I am far from being smart but I got into one of my top pick University of California The major you apply to also helps determine whether you will be accepted as well...there are a lot of factors. It takes a little research to help tailor your personal statements while trying to make it look like you are not lol My SAT scores were bottom of the barrel lol Your personal statements and background have to be top notch badassery, while still being pitiful, to get them to pick you

Just curious; how many people, who are commenting, have actually attended a university?
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21 / M / Oppai Hell
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Posted 12/14/16
Equality isn't equal scores, but equal opportunity.

Interestingly enough, 67% of people reject Affirmative Action in colleges.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/163655/reject-considering-race-college-admissions.aspx

It isn't like Blacks get a boost anyway for college admissions for being black anyway.

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21 / M / Oppai Hell
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Posted 12/14/16

HolyDrumstick wrote:


Maromi-kun wrote:

The sheer fact the SAT still exists along with its strange scoring system amazes me.


Translation: I'm afraid to offend people, but think this is stupid, but at the same time think certain people are disadvantaged, so I'll just attack a long established test/scoring system without any real information about why I think it is bad.

Answer/Question: Care to elaborate?


I do not think that is what she meant. You're just grasping at straws. In any case, the SATs do have a bit of controversy, you know standardized tests and all?

No need to be offended.
Posted 12/14/16

gennuhfurr wrote:
Just curious; how many people, who are commenting, have actually attended a university?


Aaaaaaaahahaha..... Sorry, that was one of the things I was thinking while reading some of the comments.
I think most of your statement is correct, to a degree. That doesn't undermine the fact that Ivy League/Elite (well known) colleges have been known (or rather, suspected) to have been balancing the scales based on demographics as well.
I've aced the SAT twice, the ACT once. (Went to college/university several times over the course of a decade). It does show readiness and ability to handle some of the tasks that you'll be presented within college/university. It's basically an indication as to how much "work" the college has out for them when you go to their university - are you going to be someone that may impact their bottom line (graduation rates, admission rate based off of ethnicity, and how proactive you are in clubs). That's why you fill out those obnoxiously massive application forms (well, massive once you've written your essay/s) - that, on top of your SAT/ACT scores, give the Admissions team a good idea as to what kind of student you are (and your work ethics). Sometimes one makes up for the other and vice versa. Sometimes it doesn't.


Rujikin wrote:

This is what racism by law looks like. Do you like it?


No, this isn't "what racism by law" looks like.
You're reading an article and taking it in a way you wish to take it because it correlates to your personal opinion. The reality is that the article outlined that there's a suspected bias to/against certain races due to their performance on the SAT scores.
Yes, this is a form of racism - but it isn't necessarily due to affirmative action. Ivy League universities discriminate for a number of reasons, unfortunately. From wealth to race to extracurriculars ... all the way down to your essay and what impression it gives to your overall personality. That's why Ivy League schools have always been considered "not fit for everyone" by their own Admissions teams. The rate of Asian American college students has nearly doubled in the past 25-30 years, yet their admission to Ivy League universities is still the same - this is where the correlation comes from. The article you've linked comes from a Princeton study - of course, it's going to outline that there is a strong bias for/again different ethnics. Try to take a moment and read the full article before "shitposting" on the forums - it really does get tedious when you only post a URL, a quote, and a one-liner to summarize your thoughts that don't really correlate to the quote you've listed.


DarthRutsula wrote:

Universities should just offer the same educations everywhere and discourage the whole thought that one school is better than the other. Fix standardized testing (somehow) and provide classes that are practical in the real world, like do you REALLY need to know calculus? Is a class like art appreciation really necessary in most cases?

Imo an education should entail a little bit of everything and then you choose what you want. If anatomy interested you, good for you, be a doctor, but I'd be damned if you can't read a simple income statement, or know how to make a powerpoint (something that a lot of people don't seem to understand).


I agree with the majority of this statement.
Standardized testing is a plague on the public school system right now. The federal government has outlined standardized tests that students must take and their scores reflect onto the teacher as well as the school overall. If the school doesn't meet the criteria for a "passing school" - then they become a "failing school". Now you would think that with all of the initiatives that the government has claimed to be undertaking to help "failing schools" that they'd pay for the vast majority of the upgrades to the teacher roster, better materials and equipment for the school, and so forth - but, they rarely even pay half of these costs and leave it up to the state's board of education to ration out their budget to make up for the shortfall of the school (despite the standardized test is a federal requirement).

As someone who has a Master's Degree in Mathematics, I really wish that more people would take Calculus or Trigonometry. I understand that these courses aren't easy for everyone, but they do offer a different perspective on how to correlate data/information. Some schools actually do have "life courses" like the ones you've mentioned (in high school, especially). As time progresses, more schools are focused on their students passing the standardized exams - which shows the decaying amount of "life courses" because the school's focus is more so to satisfy the federal government's requirement of a "passing" school. I can say that I found the joy of cooking and the ability to sew/hem my own clothes because of some of these courses in middle school (Home Economics). The same course taught me how to double-check my pay stub for any inconsistencies, how to balance a checkbook/bank account and change my own oil/tires on a vehicle. I was 13 years old and probably knew more about the "real world" than most people graduating from college do these days (because these kinds of courses are dwindling away).


PeripheralVisionary wrote:

Equality isn't equal scores, but equal opportunity.

Interestingly enough, 67% of people reject Affirmative Action in colleges.



That's usually because by the time someone reaches the age to go to college, they know that their peers are going to be equal in some way or another. Affirmative action in college just causes conflicts like these. The university of Texas had a run where they had stopped using the Affirmative Action laws (this was supported by the Supreme Court temporarily while they come to a conclusion), it did impact the enrollment of African-Americans in that particular college. The Supreme Court ruled in favor of keeping the Affirmative Action laws applied to colleges as the test run concluded that we still need these kinds of laws to ensure that there's a "proportional minority representation on large, public college campuses". This test was done twelve or so years ago, as far as I recall. The statements during the Supreme Court's case implied that they feel that it shouldn't be necessary in 25 years (from that point) - but they voted to keep it going for the time being. Nobody has actually challenged it since.

I reject that we should need it - and most college students should know well enough whether or not they can handle being in college (or drop out when they realize this themselves). Unfortunately, these kinds of decisions aren't left up to fellow college students in a lot of colleges. That means that it's some old fogey who simply has the antiquated idea that races have different intelligence levels. Some of the posts on this forum indicate that there are users who agree with this and they're only in their late 20's to early 30's (around my age). I don't know how we're really going to get around to handling all of this fairly when there's a division even in the age gap that should accept their peers as equals in some way or another... lol.
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Posted 12/14/16

Rujikin wrote:

This is what racism by law looks like.


No, this is what lying for money looks like.

"This spreadsheet has statistics that say you need exactly what I'm trying to sell you right now."

Wow! What are the odds?! I sure am lucky you happened to have that spreadsheet in your slide deck, let me tell you.
Posted 12/14/16

ninjitsuko wrote:



No, this isn't "what racism by law" looks like.

Yes, this is a form of racism -





The delusion is real
Posted 12/14/16

Amyas_Leigh wrote:


ninjitsuko wrote:

The delusion is real


Yes, your delusion is real.
You didn't read the fact that the article was showing a study - nothing that illustrates or correlates to the actual aspect of Affirmative Action.
Maybe if you stop using Pepe like a troll, you'd be taken more seriously.

Posted 12/14/16

ninjitsuko wrote:

You didn't read the fact that the article was showing a study - nothing that illustrates or correlates to the actual aspect of Affirmative Action.


The study is exposing the racist policies.

Try looking up med school acceptance rates by race and GPA.



Also stop bullying pepe plz

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Posted 12/14/16

ninjitsuko wrote:


gennuhfurr wrote:
Just curious; how many people, who are commenting, have actually attended a university?


Aaaaaaaahahaha..... Sorry, that was one of the things I was thinking while reading some of the comments.
I think most of your statement is correct, to a degree. That doesn't undermine the fact that Ivy League/Elite (well known) colleges have been known (or rather, suspected) to have been balancing the scales based on demographics as well.
I've aced the SAT twice, the ACT once. (Went to college/university several times over the course of a decade). It does show readiness and ability to handle some of the tasks that you'll be presented within college/university. It's basically an indication as to how much "work" the college has out for them when you go to their university - are you going to be someone that may impact their bottom line (graduation rates, admission rate based off of ethnicity, and how proactive you are in clubs). That's why you fill out those obnoxiously massive application forms (well, massive once you've written your essay/s) - that, on top of your SAT/ACT scores, give the Admissions team a good idea as to what kind of student you are (and your work ethics). Sometimes one makes up for the other and vice versa. Sometimes it doesn't.


Rujikin wrote:

This is what racism by law looks like. Do you like it?


No, this isn't "what racism by law" looks like.
You're reading an article and taking it in a way you wish to take it because it correlates to your personal opinion. The reality is that the article outlined that there's a suspected bias to/against certain races due to their performance on the SAT scores.
Yes, this is a form of racism - but it isn't necessarily due to affirmative action. Ivy League universities discriminate for a number of reasons, unfortunately. From wealth to race to extracurriculars ... all the way down to your essay and what impression it gives to your overall personality. That's why Ivy League schools have always been considered "not fit for everyone" by their own Admissions teams. The rate of Asian American college students has nearly doubled in the past 25-30 years, yet their admission to Ivy League universities is still the same - this is where the correlation comes from. The article you've linked comes from a Princeton study - of course, it's going to outline that there is a strong bias for/again different ethnics. Try to take a moment and read the full article before "shitposting" on the forums - it really does get tedious when you only post a URL, a quote, and a one-liner to summarize your thoughts that don't really correlate to the quote you've listed.


DarthRutsula wrote:

Universities should just offer the same educations everywhere and discourage the whole thought that one school is better than the other. Fix standardized testing (somehow) and provide classes that are practical in the real world, like do you REALLY need to know calculus? Is a class like art appreciation really necessary in most cases?

Imo an education should entail a little bit of everything and then you choose what you want. If anatomy interested you, good for you, be a doctor, but I'd be damned if you can't read a simple income statement, or know how to make a powerpoint (something that a lot of people don't seem to understand).


I agree with the majority of this statement.
Standardized testing is a plague on the public school system right now. The federal government has outlined standardized tests that students must take and their scores reflect onto the teacher as well as the school overall. If the school doesn't meet the criteria for a "passing school" - then they become a "failing school". Now you would think that with all of the initiatives that the government has claimed to be undertaking to help "failing schools" that they'd pay for the vast majority of the upgrades to the teacher roster, better materials and equipment for the school, and so forth - but, they rarely even pay half of these costs and leave it up to the state's board of education to ration out their budget to make up for the shortfall of the school (despite the standardized test is a federal requirement).

As someone who has a Master's Degree in Mathematics, I really wish that more people would take Calculus or Trigonometry. I understand that these courses aren't easy for everyone, but they do offer a different perspective on how to correlate data/information. Some schools actually do have "life courses" like the ones you've mentioned (in high school, especially). As time progresses, more schools are focused on their students passing the standardized exams - which shows the decaying amount of "life courses" because the school's focus is more so to satisfy the federal government's requirement of a "passing" school. I can say that I found the joy of cooking and the ability to sew/hem my own clothes because of some of these courses in middle school (Home Economics). The same course taught me how to double-check my pay stub for any inconsistencies, how to balance a checkbook/bank account and change my own oil/tires on a vehicle. I was 13 years old and probably knew more about the "real world" than most people graduating from college do these days (because these kinds of courses are dwindling away).


PeripheralVisionary wrote:

Equality isn't equal scores, but equal opportunity.

Interestingly enough, 67% of people reject Affirmative Action in colleges.



That's usually because by the time someone reaches the age to go to college, they know that their peers are going to be equal in some way or another. Affirmative action in college just causes conflicts like these. The university of Texas had a run where they had stopped using the Affirmative Action laws (this was supported by the Supreme Court temporarily while they come to a conclusion), it did impact the enrollment of African-Americans in that particular college. The Supreme Court ruled in favor of keeping the Affirmative Action laws applied to colleges as the test run concluded that we still need these kinds of laws to ensure that there's a "proportional minority representation on large, public college campuses". This test was done twelve or so years ago, as far as I recall. The statements during the Supreme Court's case implied that they feel that it shouldn't be necessary in 25 years (from that point) - but they voted to keep it going for the time being. Nobody has actually challenged it since.

I reject that we should need it - and most college students should know well enough whether or not they can handle being in college (or drop out when they realize this themselves). Unfortunately, these kinds of decisions aren't left up to fellow college students in a lot of colleges. That means that it's some old fogey who simply has the antiquated idea that races have different intelligence levels. Some of the posts on this forum indicate that there are users who agree with this and they're only in their late 20's to early 30's (around my age). I don't know how we're really going to get around to handling all of this fairly when there's a division even in the age gap that should accept their peers as equals in some way or another... lol.


One of the things a lot of colleges look for is a well rounded student body instead of well rounded students. Sadly, race plays a great part in ascertaining the diversity of a university, and this goes hand and hand with a public image and perceived fame. Despite this, I feel that quotas should be voluntary, because I understand the desire for diversity from the universities' eye, much like my view on job hiring. Universities are sort of a business.

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24 / M / Abyss
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Posted 12/14/16
It isn't like the SAT and ACT are hard anyway. I still outscored 95% of the country.
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