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Post Reply What exactly happens to people after a brutal war?
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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 12/14/16
I need to know what happens after a war far as with people. Like, what do they do after the war is finally over? Do they go back to their old lives or rebuild new ones? What exactly goes on? And it doesn't have to be war, it can be any disaster. What do the people do during the aftermath?

I'm working on a story about some people who managed to live through a violent and gruesome world war. Some of them lost everything while some still keeps what is dear to them. But the story is about them trying to survive after the war. They are trying to make their lives whole again. I just want to properly know what happens after a war. Like with the people who were trying to survive it.


What do you think?
Forgive me if this seems like a silly and pointless question. I just really need to know.

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Posted 12/14/16 , edited 12/14/16
It isn't so much silly and pointless as it depends on what kind of war, what kind of disaster, what time period it happened in, what culture it happened to, and many other things.

It is also one of the most massively documented sorts of things we have. So it may be fastest, easiest, and most accurate to look for the information in another way.

http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=psychology+of+disaster&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjjicXPsvTQAhVCoJQKHfnQDv0QgQMIGzAA

http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=psychology+of+war&btnG=&hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C3&as_vis=1

Scholarly articles dealing with some of the things you'd encounter.
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Posted 12/14/16
My brother joined the army a few years before 9/11. He was deployed to both Afghan & Iraq. Thankfully he made it out okay, but when he came back and developed PTSD.

I remember both of us having drinks together after he came back. I strait up asked him if he killed anyone while he was deployed. He looked at me and with a stone-cold face just nodded and went back to his drink. He had the face of someone who did something he wasn't proud of. I never asked him about it again.

To this day he's not told me about the dark stuff he did there. He was a sniper.
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Posted 12/14/16

gornotck wrote:

It isn't so much silly and pointless as it depends on what kind of war, what kind of disaster, what time period it happened in, what culture it happened to, and many other things.


Like for instance WW2. What did the people who survive the war do after it was over?
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Posted 12/14/16

zangeif123 wrote:

My brother joined the army a few years before 9/11. He was deployed to both Afghan & Iraq. Thankfully he made it out okay, but when he came back and developed PTSD.

I remember both of us having drinks together after he came back. I strait up asked him if he killed anyone while he was deployed. He looked at me and with a stone-cold face just nodded and went back to his drink. He had the face of someone who did something he wasn't proud of. I never asked him about it again.

To this day he's not told me about the dark stuff he did there. He was a sniper.


Does this has the same affect on people who don't fight in the war?

Example: Molly is seventeen years old and lost her family to the war. She witness terrifying things that no human being should ever see and almost died. But she luckily survive but suffers from PTSD after the war ended.
Posted 12/14/16
Most people picked up the pieces and continued on with their lives. That's about all you can do without giving up.
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Posted 12/14/16

Xxanthar wrote:

Most people picked up the pieces and continued on with their lives. That's about all you can do without giving up.


So, even after they lost everything, they'll try to restart their lives over?
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Posted 12/14/16

qualeshia3 wrote:


gornotck wrote:

It isn't so much silly and pointless as it depends on what kind of war, what kind of disaster, what time period it happened in, what culture it happened to, and many other things.


Like for instance WW2. What did the people who survive the war do after it was over?


https://www.amazon.com/Savage-Continent-Europe-Aftermath-World/dp/125003356X
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2119589/How-neighbours-turned-anarchy-erupted-Europe-aftermath-WWII.html

Basically they turned on each other, I guess, and that took some time to shake out.
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Posted 12/14/16
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Posted 12/14/16

qualeshia3 wrote:


zangeif123 wrote:

My brother joined the army a few years before 9/11. He was deployed to both Afghan & Iraq. Thankfully he made it out okay, but when he came back and developed PTSD.

I remember both of us having drinks together after he came back. I strait up asked him if he killed anyone while he was deployed. He looked at me and with a stone-cold face just nodded and went back to his drink. He had the face of someone who did something he wasn't proud of. I never asked him about it again.

To this day he's not told me about the dark stuff he did there. He was a sniper.


Does this has the same affect on people who don't fight in the war?

Example: Molly is seventeen years old and lost her family to the war. She witness terrifying things that no human being should ever see and almost died. But she luckily survive but suffers from PTSD after the war ended.


I'd say effects them more since a soilder chosses to fight. Civillians get caught in the crossfires no matter who or how old they are.

A few months back did you see the video of the Syrian boy sitting in an ambulance after being rescued from a bombing? It's so heartbreaking.
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Posted 12/14/16 , edited 12/14/16

zangeif123 wrote:

I'd say effects them more since a soilder chosses to fight. Civillians get caught in the crossfires no matter who or how old they are.

A few months back did you see the video of the Syrian boy sitting in an ambulance after being rescued from a bombing? It's so heartbreaking.


No I didn't see the video. I probably don't want to because I couldn't be able to handle it. But that does sound sad.


So a civilian getting PTSD isn't as severe as a soldier getting one?
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Posted 12/14/16
I would have to say it's worse because a "civilian" doesn't have the framework to put the stress in context.
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Posted 12/14/16

gornotck wrote:

I would have to say it's worse because a "civilian" doesn't have the framework to put the stress in context.


Alright then.
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Posted 12/14/16

qualeshia3 wrote:


zangeif123 wrote:

I'd say effects them more since a soilder chosses to fight. Civillians get caught in the crossfires no matter who or how old they are.

A few months back did you see the video of the Syrian boy sitting in an ambulance after being rescued from a bombing? It's so heartbreaking.


No I didn't see the video. I probably don't want to because I couldn't be able to handle it. But that does sound sad.


So a civilian getting PTSD isn't as severe as a soldier getting one?


I actually meant the opposite. Maybe I worded it wrong. But I'm treading into ground I know very little about. Just wanted to share my personal experience.
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Posted 12/14/16

zangeif123 wrote:


I actually meant the opposite. Maybe I worded it wrong. But I'm treading into ground I know very little about. Just wanted to share my personal experience.



Oh, okay then.
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