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What exactly happens to people after a brutal war?
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Posted 12/14/16 , edited 12/14/16

qualeshia3 wrote:
Forgive me if this seems like a silly and pointless question. I just really need to know.


It is not a silly and pointless question, but since you are asking it not for discussion purposes but for your own information and input toward your creative writing, I've moved the topic to Creative Corner.
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Posted 12/14/16 , edited 12/14/16
Thanks for the comment, cool people.
Posted 12/27/16 , edited 12/28/16
It depends on the person. War doesn't always result in PTSD and an edgy personality. My dad was in Iraq for 3 years and is still very stable (though he prefers not to talk about it at times).
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Posted 12/31/16 , edited 12/31/16
Although you mentioned WW2 I have a few anecdotals from what I recall being around my uncles who fought WW1.

My uncle Chris got a dose of mustard gas when he fought in the trenches in France. It didn't kill him but he had trouble breathing the rest of his natural life. Psychologically it didn't mess him up that I could surmise but he never talked about any of his experiences while over in France. What little I learned of it from his wife and step-brother.

My uncle Gus got the call late in the war. He trained at Ft. Riley, KS where he and some other farm boys were rounded up and sent to San Francisco, CA where they were to embark across the ocean to fight in WW1. As he recalls it the ship was barely beyond the bay when the ship suddenly turned back. A truce had been called. The war was technically over. Uncle Gus had some love letters written to his wife to be upstairs in their farmhouse where I used to stay during summers as a child. The impression I got recalling some of those overtures revealed zero fear, foreboding. Of course, war correspondence / communication and network news did not exist back then to the degree it does now.

In summary re WW1: 1 uncle didn't, for all intent and purpose, serve; the other went, got a dose of gas, wore that "souvenir" within his airway system the rest of his natural life, did not talk about any of the experience abroad to anyone ever, to my knowledge.

I have to think about WW2 as I had relatives fight in it: Japanese front, German front.

One character I do recall that my 1st cousin had as an in-law: Raymond enlisted in the US Navy and was assigned to the USS Arizona that eventually was stationed at Pearl Harbor, late 1941. His duty was armament munitions loader on 1 of the big guns that existed on deck on that dreadnought. Raymond was a bit of a rounder and late November, 1941 he decided serving in the US Navy was just a bunch of BS so he went AWOL Dec.1, 1941 and disappeared for quite some time until found by the MPs much later. (No, I'm not re-writing From Here to Eternity script). Had he remained loyal he would have either perished or drowned Dec.7. He remained in the stockade for quite some time. Because his mother had connections over here he got off light: dishonorable discharge. Did any of this affect his psyche? I don't think so. He always was a louse, a braggart, a dullard. Of all the extended family members I knew while growing up with my cousin's husband's side over the years I thought he was the worst.
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Posted 12/25/17 , edited 12/25/17
Year-end cleanup. Closing threads with no new posts since 12/31/2016
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