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Post Reply Working outside your comfort zone?
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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 12/15/16
I guess I can call this a continuation of this thread: http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-976233/why-do-people-work-at-places-that-make-them-unhappy

But I was just wondering would you like to work at a job that is in your comfort zone or out? Would you rather be comfortable working there or it really doesn't matter as long as you get a good pay check? Which is better for you?

To be comfortable or to be content? What do you think?


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25 / F / Some where far fa...
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Posted 12/15/16
I would like a job that i'm comfortable in but is also challenging so it sometimes takes me out of my comfort zone ^_^

In my current job i'm always out of my comfort zone haha!
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32 / M / Texas
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Posted 12/15/16 , edited 12/15/16
I prefer working outside the comfort zone. I approach life like I do at the gym: Don't start counting the reps until they start to burn. Pushing into that zone you can see what someone is truly made out of. At the elation of being there makes it even better.

But in terms of a job, I'd still go about it the same way. You never know what you're capable of until you've tried. Look at it this way, as a baby you didn't automatically walk out of the hospital room. At some point you've gathered the strength to walk, and tumble. You've got yourself up by your bootstraps and did it again, falling again. Eventually you've built up your leg strength and coordination to walk... then to climb stairs and then to go down stairs.


...Of course a really nice pay check would make it all the more worth while.
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Posted 12/15/16
I sometimes have to watch porn on my job, ugh

worst is if my colleague is perfectly able to do it themselves but asks me to review the film instead

and I can't say no

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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 12/15/16

FlyinDumpling wrote:

I sometimes have to watch porn on my job, ugh

worst is if my colleague is perfectly able to do it themselves but asks me to review the film instead

and I can't say no



Exactly what kind of job do you have?
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Posted 12/15/16

qualeshia3 wrote:


FlyinDumpling wrote:

I sometimes have to watch porn on my job, ugh

worst is if my colleague is perfectly able to do it themselves but asks me to review the film instead

and I can't say no



Exactly what kind of job do you have?
a job what sometimes requires me to watch adult content.

(it's a secret)
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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 12/15/16

FlyinDumpling wrote:

a job what sometimes requires me to watch adult content.

(it's a secret)



Oh alright.
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24 / M / Abyss
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Posted 12/15/16
Well, every job I have worked in was well outside my comfort zone. A lot of communication with people and physical contact. I HATE PHYSICAL CONTACT AND AM INTROVERTED AS HELL.

My idea job would be in the field looking at rocks and minerals... or in front of a computer compiling/creating data. ALONE or with a small group. I HATE BIG GROUPS. Parties for me are 5 people. Anything more than that I shrink into a corner and try to hide.
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27 / F / SC
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Posted 12/15/16 , edited 12/15/16
no im lazy
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69 / M / Columbia, MO
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Posted 12/15/16
Decades ago I was an O-O contract trucker with a moving company that had 48-state operating authority plus certain Canadian Provinces. Because of issues growing up as a kid and morbid fear of low overpasses I begged off the 13 original colonies (NEC and East Coast) and ran 35 Western scope instead of all 48 states. I did that for not quite 9 years before leaving the trucking business. Thrust forward not quite 2 decades I went to work for a freight outfit (ceased trucking haulage business in favor of straight brokerage 1997) that operated all-48 states. During my 2-week training phase I had to go to New Jersey. The wall of fear did not build up until midway across Pennsylvania. Over the years I had built up such a phobia toward driving anything greater than 4-wheels on the East Coast that I almost suffered a nervous breakdown while enroute. Shit, what was that all about? Driving the East Coast was easy. The residents were tolerant, even friendly. The streets were well marked, wide enough.

With the moving company I do recall 1 winter where a bunch of us were holed up in the LA area. If a O_O (owner-operator) was not operating for 1 of the larger booking agencies winter tended to be quite slow; even slower during recessionary times. It was not unusual for an O-O to remain in California for weeks at a time waiting for a load out of the state any direction (not Mexico). Many of the drivers had a morbid fear of snow and ice so any possibility of being dispatched running north of I-40 was an impossibility. Me, I still had monthly truck payments and I did not wish to stay in the LA Basin bored and broke weeks at a time so I volunteered to haul any GBL (gov't bill of lading) and/or anything, anywhere. Shoot, I was loaded and on my way out in 4 days' time. Some of the remaining company O-Os at 1 truckstop accused me of paying off dispatch under the table as good loads were almost extinct. However, once I showed them my bills and they saw where my destinations were in mid-January, 1977 they relented, wished me well. Yeah, who in their right mind wants to haul loads discounted 40% with high probability of claims to North Dakota, Montana, northern New Mexico, northern Arizona.....sure was not going to be them.

Got pretty acclimated driving compact snow and ice during that week delivering. Saw lots of snow, bitter cold weather. At Minot, ND I had to spend 3 days there awaiting an OK by the T.O. at an AFB (Transportation Officer) to unload HHG into storage at a local agent. The warmest it got was -5 degrees F. I didn't shut off my motor for 6 days for fear I'd never get it started if I did turn it off a few minutes so I could read my oil stick. The warmest the cab got during that week was 55 degrees F. I was wearing thermal underwear, had on winter gear, wool cap, heater on full bore at highest temp setting. The "heat" radiating outside thru the truck glass was never warm. It was like having no windows in the cab at all. Miserable.

One trip (same season, same year) I was enroute to Thermopolis, Wyo. to deliver a small load of HHG to a state worker. US 20 was the two-lane route of choice. Again, compact snow and ice with bits of cleared black road here and there. Thirty miles out someone in a 4-wheeler had spun off, went thru a fence, wound up out in a field. Nearby, tying up the westbound lane of US 20 was a Wyoming State Patrolman while a tow truck operator parked on the adjacent shoulder was trying to pull the stranded motorist in using his tow rope. Enroute before reaching this point was a small convoy of vehicles: a tanker which has passed me on compact snow & ice 5 minutes previous, myself (big honking Kenworth K100 twin-screw with 43' 6" trailer 90% empty), full-size 4-door Chevrolet sedan (who I had passed 3 miles out), 1 18-wheeler hauling freight, and 1 cattle rig running empty 2 minutes further back. As each of us heading west crested a small hill we saw the scenario that lay before us. All of us had less than 1/2 mile to come to a complete stop on compact snow and ice. Tanker had no trouble as he was loaded. I had no trouble but did remain 2 truck lengths back so I could see. Unfortunately, the guy in the Chevy hadn't allotted enough distance to stop behind my trailer so in he came sliding. Well, I didn't want to write out an accident report so I moved forward closer to the tanker in front until I was 3' away. The Chevy eventually came to a rest within 3' of my trailer's crash bar. No contact....yea, that. The freighter slowly crept up and stopped behind the Chevy. In the mean time I'm looking at the crest of the hill in my mirror. Somewhere beyond that crest is an empty cattle rig rolling along 45 mph. With 4 vehicles already sitting pretty in the westbound lane of US 20 with less than 4 truck lengths of highway remaining to the hill crest.....gee, this could get interesting.

Two minutes pass. The tow operator is still struggling with a suburban stuck out in the field. The trooper is outside stationed by his patrol car directing eastbound traffic. Presto, I see the westbound cattle rig crest the hill clicking along on compact snow and ice 45 mph. Time to inhale. I have to give that driver credit. He sized the situation up right away and, rather than become the creator of a 5 vehicle pile up, chose to pilot his rig off the highway, thru a fence out into the field. Thankfully, he didn't jack-knife, remained upright; albeit now very, very stuck. Moments pass. The trooper sizes up the situation. Motions the eastbound traffic by, then us, the westerly bounds now that the eastbound lane is open as far as the eye can see. The tanker in front of me had no trouble. The driver applied sand, gained traction, moved forward, proceeded west. Now it's my turn. I don't have much weight sitting on my drive axles. Most of my load is sitting just beyond the trailer deck so it's taking me a little longer to get rolling. As I'm slowly sauntering forward on ice the trooper motions me to be more assertive in my effort to get rolling. Gosh, am I guilty now of holding up traffic?

You know, I never was 1 to handle bullshit very well regardless of source. As I started to slowly roll by I opened my right-side electric window and gave the man a "you are number 1" middle-finger extended salute. Silly bastard, if you had parked on the shoulder near the tow vehicle none of this aftermath would have occurred. He gave me "the look". I re-iterated my response, all middle finger only extended version. Hmmm, presently too busy to take me to task over it. I finally got rolling westerly bound. Never saw or heard from that patrolman again. Looking back, it was 1 of those few times I ever got away with flipping off an authority figure.
Posted 12/15/16
I've worked outside my comfort zone before when I worked for an electrician. That type of work just isn't my cup of tea, but I needed the money before I found a more appropriate job.
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26 / M / Leanbox, Gameindu...
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Posted 12/15/16 , edited 12/15/16
Used to be an introvert, was a broke college student and waiting tables paid at least twice if not more than what retail was paying.
Made a lot of money for a young adult, and became a lot better at talking to strangers which has been an invaluable skill I've had with me ever since.

You have to try things that are different, living life in a box is boring and you might miss out on things that you might like but since you never gave them a chance you'll never know.
Posted 12/16/16
Since I'm going to be spending my entire day working at a job, I'd like to be as comfortable as the job allows.
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