Post Reply Is knowing the reason why good enough or it doesn't matter?
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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 12/16/16 , edited 12/16/16
I ask this because I was curious to know if the detectives or police officer or who ever wanted to know why. Why did the criminal rob the store or killed an innocent person? Do they ever wonder why? Or it doesn't matter why they did because in the end they caught the criminal. I guess if it were me I would be a little curious to know why they committed the crime in the first place. Do the detectives or police officer have a sense of why the criminal did it or not? Forgive me for asking such a silly and stupid question but I was really curious to know.

Apart of me gets the feeling that they don't care why the criminal committed the crime. The detectives and police officers just want the criminal captured and locked up. But as I mentioned before, I would want to little bit. I wouldn't be able to change anything but knowing would gave me some understanding of the person who committed the crime.

Anyway this might be a pointless question but it was on my mind. What do you think about it?
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Posted 12/16/16
Detectives always ask the reason why, while they figure out who. That's how they find the who, usually, is through the why. Eventually it gets settled in court. However, if someone robs a store, it's still against the law, and the officer must uphold such laws, however, the sentence of an individual is decided by the judge, not the officers or the detectives. If the judge feels that a lighter sentence is in order due to knowing that the person did not commit the crime with malicious intent, then they are able to do such a thing. So no, the good ones absolutely care why someone does something. The law is meant to protect those in society, whether it does so well or not that's up to you to evaluate and decide, but law enforcement will find out the whys if they can but their main job is to find the culprit and enact punishment to protect society from dangerous people. It's not as much a grudge on the perpetrator as a duty to defend law abiding citizens. Of course, I'm talking all in ideals, and the law hardly functions ideally in any society, if at all.
Posted 12/16/16 , edited 12/16/16
The "why" usually comes to light over the course of the investigation, I believe.

For example, a good chunk of murders are committed by people the victim knows. Given that, it's not always hard to figure out who on the family/friends list is the most likely suspect. Then the investigators find out that the murderer and the victim argued over money or drugs or something like that the night before and that the argument turned physical. Basically, by the time the murder goes to trial, the cops could have a pretty good idea about what led the killer to do what they did.

Even if they don't find out why, I'm sure investigators wonder. They're human, after all, and humans typically don't like unanswered questions.
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Posted 12/16/16
As has been said, detectives put a lot of thought into potential motives.. It's part of their job.

Police generally have less concern as to motive. This isn't a failing on their part, their job generally involves stopping or preventing a crime in or about to be in progress. Worrying about motive is a luxury that can wait for later.

But that said, it's not like it's of no concern at all to them either. Say a man gets pulled over for speeding: If he just wanted to beat the 5 o'clock rush he's probably going home with a ticket. If he's trying to get to the hospital because his wife's giving birth in the back seat, he'll probably get an escort the rest of the way there to make sure they arrive safely.
Posted 12/16/16
Means, motive, and opportunity. Three basic foundations that are legally required for criminal proceedings, at least, in most first-world countries. Not everyone involved in criminal investigations need to know the "why," but there are people in the loop who are tasked with determining it. It's not the job of the average cop to figure it out, and not everyone needs to give a damn. Furthermore, it's easy and common for people to become jaded in this line of work, and it's both exhausting and unreasonable to expect them all to be emotionally-invested in every single one of the thousands of cases they'll see over the years.
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Posted 12/16/16
Ummmmm yea.... >_>....it's part of the job lmao ur honesty on not knowing and airing it out for all to see is admirable for sure
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30 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 12/16/16
The why is a very important question to be sure. Perhaps though some place an overabundance of importance on it. In my opinion in the end all that matters is the what. Punishment I believe is only punishment when it is meted out equally for the same crime regardless of why the crime was committed. Murder is Murder, Rape is Rape, and Theft is Theft in my book and there is no reason to lighten the sentence on a convicted criminal.
Ejanss 
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Posted 12/17/16 , edited 12/17/16

qualeshia3 wrote:

I ask this because I was curious to know if the detectives or police officer or who ever wanted to know why. Why did the criminal rob the store or killed an innocent person? Do they ever wonder why? Or it doesn't matter why they did because in the end they caught the criminal. I guess if it were me I would be a little curious to know why they committed the crime in the first place. Do the detectives or police officer have a sense of why the criminal did it or not? Forgive me for asking such a silly and stupid question but I was really curious to know.


Like aeb sez, you have to prove motive, means, and opportunity in court. Motive is the "why".
Without the "why", you run the risk of picking up just anybody who happened to be there, but a good reason for committing the crime is part of the evidence.
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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 12/17/16

Ejanss wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:

I ask this because I was curious to know if the detectives or police officer or who ever wanted to know why. Why did the criminal rob the store or killed an innocent person? Do they ever wonder why? Or it doesn't matter why they did because in the end they caught the criminal. I guess if it were me I would be a little curious to know why they committed the crime in the first place. Do the detectives or police officer have a sense of why the criminal did it or not? Forgive me for asking such a silly and stupid question but I was really curious to know.


Like aeb sez, you have to prove motive, means, and opportunity in court. Motive is the "why".
Without the "why", you run the risk of picking up just anybody who happened to be there, but a good reason for committing the crime is part of the evidence.


Whew! Thank you for this comment! This thought was just racking my brain!
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