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Post Reply The 'dumbing' down if Culture.
mxdan 
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Posted 12/27/16 , edited 12/27/16
Is it mere thought or is there reason for concern?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNOSRYxfFqg

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Some people seem to think that western culture is seeing a big counter movement to intellectual thought. That it is being seen as a thing in society that should be avoided. But is it? Could it be that with the rise of the internet that the gap between the intellectual and the non-intelligent has lead to a cultural that that can't be reigned in?

What do you guys think. Is the anti-intellectual movement something to fear? Or is does it simply not exist?

EDIT: Holy cow the title irony hurts. Send help mods.
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Posted 12/27/16 , edited 12/27/16
Is it irony or just a typo that the title itself says 'if' rather then 'of' ?
Posted 12/27/16

The 'dumbing' down if Culture.


teehee
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Posted 12/27/16
Posted 12/27/16
mxdan 
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Posted 12/27/16
mxdan 
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Posted 12/27/16

Cute_Joshy wrote:

Is it irony or just a typo that the title itself says 'if' rather then 'of' ?


Total error. The "I" is next to the "O" key. I just decided to type upside down or something.
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Posted 12/27/16

mxdan wrote:


Cute_Joshy wrote:

Is it irony or just a typo that the title itself says 'if' rather then 'of' ?


Total error. The "I" is next to the "O" key. I just decided to type upside down or something.


I messed up too and had to edit my post
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Posted 12/27/16 , edited 12/27/16
the dumbing down IF culture?


idk the above but the IF fanbase mabe lol
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Posted 12/27/16
This is interesting, thanks for sharing mxdan. I'm going to have to pick up her book.
qwueri 
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Posted 12/27/16
For someone espousing intellectualism, Susan Jacoby makes a couple of dubious claims. 'Our children learn to do math on calculators and they're ranking poorly in math internationally'. 'Young boys are sitting down for three hours of video games that are not time they're spending reading books a quietly thinking.' As if the availability of entertainment is actively creating a culture that avoids information. In an effort to espouse how intellectually vacant the culture is because of entertainment, she completely misses how certain bits of information may be more or less relevant to someone not cloistered in an academic tower.

The average person not being able to find Iraq on a map when put on the spot on the street is not anything special. Aside from the pressure of being put on the spot unexpectedly, how often does the location of Iraq have to do with the daily life of that individual? Maybe a blurb on the news cast and some offhand policy platform of a congressional or presidential candidate. That's it. Similarly, when that individual grows up in a community that speaks exclusively one language and is raised with minimal use of math beyond elementary budgeting, is that a result of entertainment or is it a lifetime growing up with expectations limited to their immediate surroundings? Because I wouldn't be the least bit surprised to learn that most day laborers in the 1900s would have trouble finding somewhere on a map or practicing the arithmetic they learned in school, and it wasn't necessarily due to their schooling or indulgence in entertainment.

Jacoby seems to be suggesting that reading even a harlequin or fantasy novel is intellectually superior to watching something on television. I don't really see how watching the Twilight movies is any more intellectually stimulating that reading the novels. I think people have always been really good at learning what they need to survive and what they enjoy; that's something not special or exclusive to the information age.
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Posted 12/27/16
If that's the kind of crap that she's selling, then she's selling the same crap that they've tried selling since time began.
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Posted 12/27/16

Cute_Joshy wrote:

Is it irony or just a typo that the title itself says 'if' rather then 'of' ?


lmao
mxdan 
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Posted 12/27/16

qwueri wrote:

For someone espousing intellectualism, Susan Jacoby makes a couple of dubious claims. 'Our children learn to do math on calculators and they're ranking poorly in math internationally'. 'Young boys are sitting down for three hours of video games that are not time they're spending reading books a quietly thinking.' As if the availability of entertainment is actively creating a culture that avoids information. In an effort to espouse how intellectually vacant the culture is because of entertainment, she completely misses how certain bits of information may be more or less relevant to someone not cloistered in an academic tower.

The average person not being able to find Iraq on a map when put on the spot on the street is not anything special. Aside from the pressure of being put on the spot unexpectedly, how often does the location of Iraq have to do with the daily life of that individual? Maybe a blurb on the news cast and some offhand policy platform of a congressional or presidential candidate. That's it. Similarly, when that individual grows up in a community that speaks exclusively one language and is raised with minimal use of math beyond elementary budgeting, is that a result of entertainment or is it a lifetime growing up with expectations limited to their immediate surroundings? Because I wouldn't be the least bit surprised to learn that most day laborers in the 1900s would have trouble finding somewhere on a map or practicing the arithmetic they learned in school, and it wasn't necessarily due to their schooling or indulgence in entertainment.

Jacoby seems to be suggesting that reading even a harlequin or fantasy novel is intellectually superior to watching something on television. I don't really see how watching the Twilight movies is any more intellectually stimulating that reading the novels. I think people have always been really good at learning what they need to survive and what they enjoy; that's something not special or exclusive to the information age.


Interesting, I agree with you on most points. I do think she does make a claim that got me thinking though. I mean, there is an inherent value to reading or viewing a wide range of content outside of your interests at a young age. I think it gives people place. The point about young Americans on the whole not reading, is true. I think that lack of scope could have negative effects on our society but I'm simply speculating.
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Posted 12/27/16
Even the title of this thread is a mess.
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