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Post Reply Copyright Infringement Notices
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/1/17


i have to add this in..



--------------------

i thought my internet was down because of the rain.. but nope.. my internet provider decided to suspend my account .. the reason?

"we got a report from Warner for downloading Sully"

?? i had to look up Sully.. since i know a Sully (a character from uncharted series)

so if people are coming to my house and they are using the guest access log in to use my wi-fi.. and who knows what they do when they are online..

they will hold me accountable ? interesting..

sure.. it's like I'm lending out my car and the car was used in a robbery.. they will hold me accountable ?

i don't know much about this copyright infringement stuff but the least I'll get a refund if they decided to suspend my account (been wanting to switch provider anyway- 3 price increases within 1 year) .. if not we might have a lawsuit on our hands..

i wonder.. when people are using public wi-fi and they are downloading illegal movies.. who will be responsible? the business?

when i searched to read more about the issue in question.. i learned a lot of things..

accusing the account holder of something that you have no proof over beside ip address and logs? yeah.. that will work well..

after calling them (since i thought it was the rain) they reactivated my account again..

i guess this is an on going battle/issue.. an old article

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/people-accused-online-piracy-win-450000-warner-bros-rightscorp-class-action-lawsuit-1537799

from what i learned.. so what's the point of downloading movies when you can stream the movies illegal anyway ?

they will lose customers this way...since i'm sure there's nothing people hate more than being denied service or accused of something they have no clue about or was done by someone else

maybe i should confiscate all electronics at the front door at the next gathering..
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17
Suggestion: password protect your wifi and only let very trusted friends/family know the password. tell them not to download anything or do anything illegal..that should solve your problem.
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17
You should use Tor for general browsing next time, but you're going to have to say goodbye to the Google search engine, because it's not anonymous and everyone uses it. But anyway, screw you Warner for going too far with this pessimism about copyright infringement.
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17
Question: how would the rain take your internet down?

Don't have a guest wifi, because you have no way of knowing what people will download, you just give them a free pass to use your internet for whatever. Unless you have a firewall like a school does.
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17

DarthRutsula wrote:

Question: how would the rain take your internet down?


Don't have a guest wifi, because you have no way of knowing what people will download, you just give them a free pass to use your internet for whatever. Unless you have a firewall like a school does.


Answer- we have what they call monsoon season around here.. when it rains.. you can get downed power lines, accidents, etc..



JohnnyOmaha wrote:

Suggestion: password protect your wifi and only let very trusted friends/family know the password. tell them not to download anything or do anything illegal..that should solve your problem.



guest wi-fi is not wi-fi with no password though..

my guest wi-fi is like those free wi-fi at a business

when someone comes in.. they can see the ssid and password (for guests) if they want to use the internet while there..

of course there's no stopping a guest from continuing to use the wi-fi for something illegal..

starbucks stores have free wi-fi.. so will their account get banned for guests downloading illegal contents? i doubt it.


we should suspecting your friends/co-worker/family members? it will be interesting to see thousands of accounts being suspended over this..

i don't know who it was and i don't really care to be honest.. i'm not going around and suspecting my friends/co-worker/relatives




KurtIrving wrote:

You should Tor for general browsing next time, but you're going to have to say goodbye to the Google search engine, because it's not anonymous and everyone uses it. But anyway, screw you Warner for going too far with this pessimism about copyright infringement.


i heard of Tor from ABCnews.. but it's for messaging only right? some encrypted messaging app that people use (also isis) ?

btw. you heard of duckduckgo
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DuckDuckGo

not the best as google with search results.. and i don't know the claim they are making is true..

Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17

AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:

so if people are coming to my house and they are using the guest access log in to use my wi-fi.. and who knows what they do when they are online..

they will hold me accountable ? interesting..


Long story, short: yes.
You will always be held accountable for the traffic on your Internet. Guest WiFi should have a very basic/generic password that you can easily put on your refridgerator or otherwise so that your guests can connect to it without it being an "open wifi network". When the Wifi (Guest or otherwise) is open, you're basically telling anyone to connect to your network and use it as they please (with some moderation due to it being a Guest network).

From an ISP perspective, your traffic is your traffic. When it comes to organizations like the MPAA and RIAA - that's all they need to have your account suspended or terminated (in worst case scenarios).


AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:
accusing the account holder of something that you have no proof over beside ip address and logs? yeah.. that will work well..


Imagine if you had a firearm registered to your name and it was stolen. The firearm was used in a robbery and left at the scene of the crime. It has your fingerprints on it and registered to your name, but you didn't know it was stolen (so it was never reported). You'd have to prove that it was stolen or that you were unaware of it.. otherwise, you hope that the police will investigate further. An ISP isn't required to investigate any further when they receive a request from an organization indicating that there's a copyright infringement from a particular IP address.

When I worked as a security consultant for an ISP, one of the first things I started focusing on was ensuring that onsite technicians would not create a Guest WiFi network if the modem/router supported one. They're not a good idea without some sense of understanding that you're accountable for your traffic. If you secure the Guest WiFi with a password that is complicated, yet easy (just use WPA2-PSK and one number/symbol), then go for it. Opening that up for everyone that drives by or lives near you is just going to cause repeat scenarios like the one you've experienced today.


AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:
they will lose customers this way...since i'm sure there's nothing people hate more than being denied service or accused of something they have no clue about or was done by someone else


From the perspective of the ISP company, users that are repeat offenders of copyright infringement aren't users they really care about losing - as it costs more to keep lawyers on retainers than the money they make from keeping customers like this. Just have to keep in mind that your traffic is your responsibility. If you don't trust people on your wifi, don't let them on it. I used to have a Guest WiFi network that had MAC filtering - so that I would confirm the MAC address of specific persons who want access (family members/friends) and then they could connect. Anyone not on the MAC filtering list were rejected from connecting.
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17

AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:


DarthRutsula wrote:

Question: how would the rain take your internet down?


Don't have a guest wifi, because you have no way of knowing what people will download, you just give them a free pass to use your internet for whatever. Unless you have a firewall like a school does.


Answer- we have what they call monsoon season around here.. when it rains.. you can get down power lines, accidents, etc..


KurtIrving wrote:

You should Tor for general browsing next time, but you're going to have to say goodbye to the Google search engine, because it's not anonymous and everyone uses it. But anyway, screw you Warner for going too far with this pessimism about copyright infringement.


i heard of Tor from ABCnews.. but it's for messaging only right? some encrypted messaging app that people use (also isis) ?

btw. you heard of duckduckgo
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DuckDuckGo

not the best as google with search results.. and i don't know the claim they are making is true..



I didn't know that Time Warner had internet infrastructure in Asia.

I think Tor is more like a web browser and I kind of question how it prevents an ISP from monitoring your network since the connection has to go through them first before it gets anywhere (at least based on my understanding on how the Internet works). And based on my experience with my ISP they don't care about whatever the hell you do. Though I am curious on how they track you on what you look up or whatever.

Like if I looked up a certain type of porn would I have law enforcement at my front door? Would the ISP deny internet access? Or would I just end up going my merry way?

Not that I'm inquisitive enough to try it though.
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17

DarthRutsula wrote:

I didn't know that Time Warner had internet infrastructure in Asia.

Warner (as in Warner Bros. Pictures) owns the rights to a movie called "Sully", and filed a copyright infringement complaint with his ISP. He never said Time Warner is his ISP.
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17

iriomote wrote:


DarthRutsula wrote:

I didn't know that Time Warner had internet infrastructure in Asia.

Warner (as in Warner Bros. Pictures) owns the rights to a movie called "Sully", and filed a copyright infringement complaint with his ISP. He never said Time Warner is his ISP.


Doesn't help that there is/was an ISP with the same name.

My fault there.

Though now I'm curious how the movie publisher(s) know what gets downloaded over the interweb. Is it some sort of web-pinging DRM on the software?
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17

DarthRutsula wrote:

Doesn't help that there is/was an ISP with the same name.

My fault there.

Though now I'm curious how the movie publisher(s) know what gets downloaded over the interweb. Is it some sort of web-pinging DRM on the software?

Sorry, wasn't trying to sound accusatory, only clarifying.

As to your question: So far as I know, usually they find your IP through your use of Peer to Peer filesharing (i.e. torrents).

All they have to do is collect a list of the IPs of people that are connected to a torrent tracker and then file a complaint with their respective ISPs saying, "This IP of yours was downloading/sharing ____ illegally at such and such date and time". Then the ISP can figure out which customer of theirs was using that IP at the time from their own logs.
Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17

AnimeAddictANN69 wrote:

i heard of Tor from ABCnews.. but it's for messaging only right? some encrypted messaging app that people use (also isis) ?

btw. you heard of duckduckgo
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DuckDuckGo

not the best as google with search results.. and i don't know the claim they are making is true..



Tor is a "network" of volunteer-operated servers that you will receive your browsing data from when you're utilizing their browser (that connects to the network). Because this system is kind of "off the grid" (in a manner of speaking), some people create .onion or .tor links that are hidden from the Internet (in terms of DNS resolving) - they can only be resolved when connected to the Tor network. It's meant to make your traffic more anonymous and secure. There is a way to use some messaging apps on the Tor network as well or similar infrastructures.

DuckDuckGo is probably one of the few search engines I use outside of Google (majority of the times, I'm not researching news topics and Google has better academic-based results than DDG).


DarthRutsula wrote:

Like if I looked up a certain type of porn would I have law enforcement at my front door? Would the ISP deny internet access? Or would I just end up going my merry way?

Not that I'm inquisitive enough to try it though.


In some cases? Yes, they will be knocking at your door. Several intelligence agencies (FBI/CIA/ASIO/NCA/M15... etc) will have a special force that is tasked with monitoring this kind of traffic. This doesn't mean that one red flag is going to have an entire SWAT team at your door but it does mean if you're downloading a specific type of pornography that is illegal in the country you live in there's a chance that you'll have the local bureau of investigation at your door eventually. Mind you, it's not a flawless system because not all ISPs will allow the government to monitor this type of information. They will, however, plant themselves as a seed on torrents or other network infrastructures that would allow them to obtain your IP address as you download said pornography.

And please don't get too inquisitive. Sure, you won't find police banging at your door immediately or, in many cases, at all - but why tempt it? lol.
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17
You're responsible for what happens on your network. You are the assigned network administrator, therefore it is your responsibility to secure your own network. If you don't know how, at the very least put in a strong password (no mixture of words) - for a really good password use random letters, numbers, capitalization of some letters, special characters in various positions. Another thing you can do is find out who connects to your router (most routers have some software to manage who is connected to it). From there you can ban people you don't know or kick them off by changing your password again. Also, don't name your wireless signal your address or anything personal. A good way to name your wireless signal is to use your router's name followed by your signal frequency such as 5 GHz, 3 GHz, etc. If there are a lot of them in your area, you can put random numbers at the end of your router's name so you know instantly which one is yours.
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17
I think Charter has a similar thing with copyright notices, but they don't take down your internet for it. Also, they stopped bothering us when we ignored their message
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17


as i read further more into this..

this site has all the news about the on going battle regarding copyright
https://torrentfreak.com/


i learned of Rightscorp,kickass,popcorn time.. etc..

these copyright companies were sued before just as they are trying to sue account holders..


no offense.. but being a gun owner myself.. that example was a horrible one.. since i don't allow anyone to use my guns


having a guest access --where you set up an ssid and password for guests to use is not like having guns stolen either

when your guns are stolen who would not report it right away ?

imo.. the best example is using free wi-fi at public places or private businesses-- where access to the internet were provided to guests/customers..

if your customers downloaded illegal materials? what then ? ban the business' account ?

it looks like an on going battle..


it took them how long to prosecute a convicted criminal with sufficient evidences?...and they want to go after paying customers with ip address and logs?..

anyway.. they gave me notice.. saying something bout "multiple warnings will result in the suspension of the account for 6 months"

i guess if there is a lawsuit it will be from Rightscrop or Warner.. . i'm actually looking forward to it.. since i'm curious how they will prove it in court and i want to counter sue them as well..

this is like when i got traffic tickets for running the red light-- even though i was at work (on the phone sitting at a desk) at the exact time on the ticket-- long story short.. a family member borrowed my car and lend it out to someone else.. the person in question ran a red light..

the ticket was sent to me because i'm the registered owner but all i did was sent back a copy of my driver license and signature on the form and that was it... no ticket or court date after that..

it happened 3 times already.. i work from home so i lend out my car-- i think there's an app where you can lend out your car to people for a small fee as well too i think..

https://www.getaround.com/

the owner will not be responsible for any ticket what so ever and for the same reason.. will you sentence the owner for the violation/crime of another person?

it will be the day..

as i'm reading more into it.. the lawsuits are against notorious pirates who uploaded a lot of illegal contents over a long period of time..

at least this was educational.. i didn't know you can pretty much stream a lot of illegal stuff now a day..
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Posted 1/1/17 , edited 1/2/17

ninjitsuko wrote:

DuckDuckGo is probably one of the few search engines I use outside of Google (majority of the times, I'm not researching news topics and Google has better academic-based results than DDG).


DarthRutsula wrote:

Like if I looked up a certain type of porn would I have law enforcement at my front door? Would the ISP deny internet access? Or would I just end up going my merry way?

Not that I'm inquisitive enough to try it though.


In some cases? Yes, they will be knocking at your door. Several intelligence agencies (FBI/CIA/ASIO/NCA/M15... etc) will have a special force that is tasked with monitoring this kind of traffic. This doesn't mean that one red flag is going to have an entire SWAT team at your door but it does mean if you're downloading a specific type of pornography that is illegal in the country you live in there's a chance that you'll have the local bureau of investigation at your door eventually. Mind you, it's not a flawless system because not all ISPs will allow the government to monitor this type of information. They will, however, plant themselves as a seed on torrents or other network infrastructures that would allow them to obtain your IP address as you download said pornography.

And please don't get too inquisitive. Sure, you won't find police banging at your door immediately or, in many cases, at all - but why tempt it? lol.


No, I'd be inquisitive to see how long it'd take before they realize that I have illegal porn and do something about it. Heck you don't even hear about it that often so I'd imagine its not something that people get caught for. Hell the ONLY time I can think of this happening was one of my more favorite voice actors (Scott not-so-freeman) was charged with possession.

Its funny how anonymous the internet can be. Like we freak out over Isis having really good communications stuff or whatever without realizing that WE (as americans) have access to, and wider use, of that software. I totally see both sides of the arguement between how good the security on an Iphone can be. It's either too secure which impedes the jobs of the people tasked with protecting us, or its not secured enough (as evidenced later in the case) for those who want to stay anonymous.
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