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Post Reply Is America headed in the right direction?
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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/24/17
Not with a Proposed Muslim Registry, removal of 40+ million government jobs and 600 billion dollars in revenue, the removal of anti-discrimination laws and championing forced-birther and anti-LGBT views, a man with a short fuse, and a party that is dead set on the removal or privatization of our social safety net programs like Social Security. Oh, no, I have no love for this utter mess of what is going to happen. But, the women's march did prove something: we will fight regression, be heard, and march.
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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/23/17
In the end, you really can't definitively say where we're headed. To me, the status quo obviously wasn't working, and simply locking it in place doesn't change much. Enough people wanted change to go with a chaotic wild card rather than someone predictable and similar to the leaders before. One side will do something the other perceives to be stupid and then the offended side does something equally stupid, and we sort of bumble our way to success, making many mistakes along the way. That's how the world is, though. And people are way too focused on the white house when they should be taking care of important matters right in front of their noses.

You probably won't even feel most of the effects of the presidency.
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/24/17
no!
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/24/17

MopZ wrote:

Not with a Proposed Muslim Registry, removal of 40+ million government jobs and 600 billion dollars in revenue, the removal of anti-discrimination laws and championing forced-birther and anti-LGBT views, a man with a short fuse, and a party that is dead set on the removal or privatization of our social safety net programs like Social Security. Oh, no, I have no love for this utter mess of what is going to happen. But, the women's march did prove something: we will fight regression, be heard, and march.


No, it really didn't prove anything. The thing is, other than the media, no one cares. Until you actually hit people in the pocketbook, a peaceful protest simply shows that you don't like something and that you're willing to waste a day of your life to support it. The march created more jobs and money for the area, and those in power that you might not like will likely see the benefits of that. In a few short weeks, the March will be just another footnote in the page of history.

As for the question, I like where this country is heading. I like that this country, as well as many other European nations, are focusing more on improving themselves instead of everyone else in the world. The only way things are going to improve in the world is if people from poorer nations stop seeing these wealthier nations as a way out instead of staying put and fighting for change in their respective country.

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Posted 1/24/17

Akage-chan wrote:


MopZ wrote:

Not with a Proposed Muslim Registry, removal of 40+ million government jobs and 600 billion dollars in revenue, the removal of anti-discrimination laws and championing forced-birther and anti-LGBT views, a man with a short fuse, and a party that is dead set on the removal or privatization of our social safety net programs like Social Security. Oh, no, I have no love for this utter mess of what is going to happen. But, the women's march did prove something: we will fight regression, be heard, and march.


No, it really didn't prove anything. The thing is, other than the media, no one cares. Until you actually hit people in the pocketbook, a peaceful protest simply shows that you don't like something and that you're willing to waste a day of your life to support it. The march created more jobs and money for the area, and those in power that you might not like will likely see the benefits of that. In a few short weeks, the March will be just another footnote in the page of history.

As for the question, I like where this country is heading. I like that this country, as well as many other European nations, are focusing more on improving themselves instead of everyone else in the world. The only way things are going to improve in the world is if people from poorer nations stop seeing these wealthier nations as a way out instead of staying put and fighting for change in their respective country.



That's a interesting way to look at it. Having smaller nations plead their case and negotiate a fair trade for things they may need. Island nations in particular rely on tourism and imports to survive but might not have anything to offer in return except land government cooperation or the little military aid they can muster. Charity isn't always the answer.
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Posted 1/24/17

zangeif123 wrote:

I got the feeling we took 10 steps backwards. Prove me wrong Trump, please.


More like 20.
Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/24/17
Personally, I'm not too keen on the whole "nationalism" perspective that several countries are taking (including the United States). When it comes to the Republican party as a whole, over the course of our history thus far, most of their policy adjustments have been garnished towards short-term yield instead of longevity yield. It's much like the principle of "Implied Longevity Yield" - the longer you wait, the more you'll be able to yield. Republicans, to date, have systematically tried to appeal to the current generation of citizens without much concern for the long-term.

The sweep of nationalism in modern day society is due to excessive social progress. Democrats usually focus on social progress and "unseen/projected" yield (in the long term). Because people do not see the impact immediately, it's suspected that Democrats being in the majority (Congress) causes economic downfalls - ergo, the "back and forth" of power in the house (people try to give one party a chance for a number of years, when progress of either side has taken a dive - it switches back to the opposite party).

I fear that people who get all worked up about "globalism" are the same types that would rather have their own life comfortable and satisfied with their own world before focusing on the world around them. Unfortunately, converting the country to the so-called "pragmatic realization" of nationalism isn't going to yield much for the country in the long term in terms of economic growth. It will appear to be beneficial in the short-term (and this is why people will think a Republican-powered Congress is sufficient) - yet, any downsides won't be seen for another 20+ years.

The question was "Is America headed in the right direction?" ...
My TL;DR answer is going to be: It's not going in any direction and hasn't been for a while now.

We've continued to stalemate progress of both economic and social aspects of our country due to divisive ideologies/views. No matter how people see Trump or Republicans or Obama or Democrats... it doesn't necessarily matter in the long-term. We're not focusing on long-term yield economically (neither Democrats nor Republicans) and social progress is often met with "anti-progress" (due to our innate desire to make it an "us vs them" thing). So until we get over the bullshit of "libtards" and "nazi's" and all that silliness and accept that both parties can get together to make progress in all aspects of a country (economic growth, social progress, and "growth" as a society) ... we're just going to be going back and forth like we have been for the last 50-100 years (in various areas).
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/24/17
I feel a lot more hopefully now than I did during the past 8 years (or really, 16). Bush and Obama were really much of the same, just a different package. There has always been so much partisan bickering that rarely anything of value gets done. I also didn't like the idea of sending money to countries that want to kill us. During the final days of the Obama Administration, $221 million was sent to Palestine. Why? This country is controlled by Hamas, and they don't take too kindly to Israel and the US. So why are we sending them money that will likely make its way to buying more weapons to kill people?

See, if we could guarantee that all the money would go to rebuilding schools and homes destroyed by fighting, I might be more on board with the idea of sending funds. But more often then not, the government in charge takes a cut and diverts funds to more weapons. If you're lucky, maybe a bag of rice might make its way to someone who needs it. Sending food aid doesn't help either, as government personnel often hoarde it either for personal use or to resell at a huge profit to those who can least afford it.
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Posted 1/24/17
No!












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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/24/17
Right now with the wars being waged and spending going up I think the country is headed in the wrong direction.

I think ending the war in Iraq and Afghanistan, ending aid is losing foreign conflicts like Syria, simplifying the tax code and cutting or reducing government programs is the best way for America to start paying down its debt.

I still think money should be spent to fight disease worldwide and essentials like the CDC, NASA and the Pentagon should get all the funding they need.

I'd also like the leaders of both political parties to sit down and figure out their sides can agree on. Because the only opinion they share is their side should be in power and that sentiment has trickled down to their followers, in almost a religious way.
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Posted 1/25/17 , edited 1/25/17
It all depends, really. Is Russia heading in the right direction with allowing Putin to seize absolute power by making it illegal for him to be impeached throughout this decade? Is Japan heading in the right direction with PM Abe, a man who wishes to see Japan's military expand for the first time since World War 2? Did Iran make the right decision by overthrowing the Shah in the 80s?

A country going in a certain direction all depends, really. Some say yes, others, no. One simply has to go with the flow, or be involved in government/politics.
runec 
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Posted 1/25/17

MysticGon wrote:


Akage-chan wrote:
As for the question, I like where this country is heading. I like that this country, as well as many other European nations, are focusing more on improving themselves instead of everyone else in the world. The only way things are going to improve in the world is if people from poorer nations stop seeing these wealthier nations as a way out instead of staying put and fighting for change in their respective country.



That's a interesting way to look at it. Having smaller nations plead their case and negotiate a fair trade for things they may need. Island nations in particular rely on tourism and imports to survive but might not have anything to offer in return except land government cooperation or the little military aid they can muster. Charity isn't always the answer.


I don't think applying the myth of the welfare queen to entire nations is going to solve anything. Wealthier nations, the US especially, are quite happy to exploit poorer nations for their own gain. Especially in terms of consumer products. 10 year olds in Bangladesh aren't making t-shirts for 14 hours a day for less than a dollar in pay in unregulated sweat shops because they want too. They're doing it because you don't want to pay more than $5 for a t-shirt at Walmart.

Wealthier nations exploit the ever living shit out of poorer nations and have been quite happy to do so for decades. Blaming them for not "staying put and fighting for change" shows a gross misunderstanding of the situation in these countries and our responsibility in their problems.

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Posted 1/25/17

runec wrote:


MysticGon wrote:


Akage-chan wrote:
As for the question, I like where this country is heading. I like that this country, as well as many other European nations, are focusing more on improving themselves instead of everyone else in the world. The only way things are going to improve in the world is if people from poorer nations stop seeing these wealthier nations as a way out instead of staying put and fighting for change in their respective country.



That's a interesting way to look at it. Having smaller nations plead their case and negotiate a fair trade for things they may need. Island nations in particular rely on tourism and imports to survive but might not have anything to offer in return except land government cooperation or the little military aid they can muster. Charity isn't always the answer.


I don't think applying the myth of the welfare queen to entire nations is going to solve anything. Wealthier nations, the US especially, are quite happy to exploit poorer nations for their own gain. Especially in terms of consumer products. 10 year olds in Bangladesh aren't making t-shirts for 14 hours a day for less than a dollar in pay in unregulated sweat shops because they want too. They're doing it because you don't want to pay more than $5 for a t-shirt at Walmart.

Wealthier nations exploit the ever living shit out of poorer nations and have been quite happy to do so for decades. Blaming them for not "staying put and fighting for change" shows a gross misunderstanding of the situation in these countries and our responsibility in their problems.



Yeah cheap tech, clothes and basic everyday items like tools, toys and furniture are imported to the U.S. because American labor laws and market forces make it near impossible to do it any other way. So you are right that their labor is another thing they can offer but I think there should be a change to that. Like on the U.N. side of things.
runec 
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Posted 1/25/17

MysticGon wrote:
Yeah cheap tech, clothes and basic everyday items like tools, toys and furniture are imported to the U.S. because American labor laws and market forces make it near impossible to do it any other way. So you are right that their labor is another thing they can offer but I think there should be a change to that. Like on the U.N. side of things.


This is the quintessential problem with blowing smoke up the ass of the rust belt by telling them all their manufacturing jobs will magically come back. America cannot afford to manufacture these products and no American would pay the resulting price tag to make it possible. And thats putting aside that the manufacturing base and infrastructure just isn't there anymore.

America isn't going to out sew the developing world. It shouldn't even be trying to compete with it there. It needs to be innovating and developing products that can only be manufactured over here. Not trying to cling to ones its long since lost the competition for. The world is awash in unskilled labour. If its a product a 12 year old can put together in a couple minutes you're not going to win that fight.

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Posted 1/25/17

runec wrote:


MysticGon wrote:
Yeah cheap tech, clothes and basic everyday items like tools, toys and furniture are imported to the U.S. because American labor laws and market forces make it near impossible to do it any other way. So you are right that their labor is another thing they can offer but I think there should be a change to that. Like on the U.N. side of things.


This is the quintessential problem with blowing smoke up the ass of the rust belt by telling them all their manufacturing jobs will magically come back. America cannot afford to manufacture these products and no American would pay the resulting price tag to make it possible. And thats putting aside that the manufacturing base and infrastructure just isn't there anymore.

America isn't going to out sew the developing world. It shouldn't even be trying to compete with it there. It needs to be innovating and developing products that can only be manufactured over here. Not trying to cling to ones its long since lost the competition for. The world is awash in unskilled labour. If its a product a 12 year old can put together in a couple minutes you're not going to win that fight.



Well if you want to get radical there are more prison in the U.S. than anywhere else. Also the culture kids have these days is "ask parents for stuff" instead of "work so I can buy stuff". Things that can change.
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