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What programs do you write/have written?
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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/23/17
I am currently using Python to get texts online and analyze the fashion trend. This is just one of the programs I've worked before. I am always fond of 2D and 3D game production, but have never gotten into it. What programs have you worked on?
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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/23/17
Oh wow. A post I can directly relate to.


fredreload wrote:
I am currently using Python to get texts online and analyze the fashion trend. This is just one of the programs I've worked before.


Oh. I'm guessing the work you do revolves around pattern recognition/machine learning?



fredreload wrote:
I am always fond of 2D and 3D game production, but have never gotten into it. What programs have you worked on?


I primarily focus on firmware rather than applications that run on a general purpose computers. For instance, I'm writing in VHDL the description of a custom processor. But, in order to compile and run applications on it, I also write the low-level drivers with a mixture of C and assembly. I general, I tend program mostly in either C++ or C.

I find it somewhat funny there are a lot of STEM people on crunchy roll, by the way. Didn't really expect to find so many.
Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/23/17
At Work:
I've been working on a web-based VoIP client (designed in jQuery, Bootstrap, and using the WebGL library). On top of that, I'm restructuring how our infrastructure handles SIP traffic through a proprietary codec (instead of G.711/G.729) that allows for wider range of companding. This is mostly done through C/C++.

At Home:
For the last ten or eleven years, I've been sporadically working on an AI system that revolves around machine learning and robotics. It changes "direction" in terms of what I want it to do (mostly in regard to the shift in my own hobbies). Currently, it tends to find like-minded objects (or exact objects) from a photo on various sites (primary search source is Thingiverse) to print through the 3D printer (it only confirms and then proceeds to print). In the past, it used to be used as silly IRC bot that determined human behavior from keywords on channels (then compare based on levels of emotions to that of potential symptoms .. then compare symptoms to the DSM-IV).

This is all done in C++.

In the Past:

I grew up strictly on ASM x86. I wrote Linux drivers back when there wasn't a massive repository that you could download almost any you needed from. I'm still an Assembly coder, pure and true. It's just that it's hard to get additional input from people who barely understand ASM (usually college kids who took a three-week break from Java/C++ in a course to learn about inline ASM). Used to work for SAIC and coded quite a few underlying structures and applications in Assembly.

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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/23/17

TheLandOfGiants wrote:

Oh wow. A post I can directly relate to.


fredreload wrote:
I am currently using Python to get texts online and analyze the fashion trend. This is just one of the programs I've worked before.


Oh. I'm guessing the work you do revolves around pattern recognition/machine learning?



fredreload wrote:
I am always fond of 2D and 3D game production, but have never gotten into it. What programs have you worked on?


I primarily focus on firmware rather than applications that run on a general purpose computers. For instance, I'm writing in VHDL the description of a custom processor. But, in order to compile and run applications on it, I also write the low-level drivers with a mixture of C and assembly. I general, I tend program mostly in either C++ or C.

I find it somewhat funny there are a lot of STEM people on crunchy roll, by the way. Didn't really expect to find so many.


I used a bit of VHDL back in school, had to make a PONG game out of that lol. Right I've only done words frequency so far, for instance I search Google with words and analyze the trend that goes on. Have not found a better way for analyzing the texts beside words frequency. And sorry I cannot disclose too much due to company policy . I posted it because I got excited = =, sorry about that.

Drivers and firmware, cool stuff I wanted to work on but never got a chance. Keep up the good work, I am outdated on that field it seems
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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/23/17

fredreload wrote:
Right I've only done words frequency so far, for instance I search Google with words and analyze the trend that goes on. Have not found a better way for analyzing the texts beside words frequency.
seems


This isn't really my field, but it sounds as though work in pattern recognition/machine learning might be useful for whatever you're doing.


fredreload wrote:
And sorry I cannot disclose too much due to company policy . I posted it because I got excited = =, sorry about that.
seems


lol Darn. Understandable, though. Good luck in your work!


fredreload wrote:
Drivers and firmware, cool stuff I wanted to work on but never got a chance. Keep up the good work, I am outdated on that field it
seems


It's pretty fun lol. One of the few areas where knowing how to program in assembly is useful.


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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/23/17

TheLandOfGiants wrote:


fredreload wrote:
Right I've only done words frequency so far, for instance I search Google with words and analyze the trend that goes on. Have not found a better way for analyzing the texts beside words frequency.
seems


This isn't really my field, but it sounds as though work in pattern recognition/machine learning might be useful for whatever you're doing.


fredreload wrote:
And sorry I cannot disclose too much due to company policy . I posted it because I got excited = =, sorry about that.
seems


lol Darn. Understandable, though. Good luck in your work!


fredreload wrote:
Drivers and firmware, cool stuff I wanted to work on but never got a chance. Keep up the good work, I am outdated on that field it
seems


It's pretty fun lol. One of the few areas where knowing how to program in assembly is useful.




Thanks man
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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/24/17

ninjitsuko wrote:
At Work:
I've been working on a web-based VoIP client (designed in jQuery, Bootstrap, and using the WebGL library). On top of that, I'm restructuring how our infrastructure handles SIP traffic through a proprietary codec (instead of G.711/G.729) that allows for wider range of companding. This is mostly done through C/C++.


So, I'm guessing that equals being able to send a greater range of sounds in real-time over the internet lol? I've had a class in digital communications and a few in data networks, so I'm at least familiar with VoIP and companding.


ninjitsuko wrote:
At Home:
For the last ten or eleven years, I've been sporadically working on an AI system that revolves around machine learning and robotics. It changes "direction" in terms of what I want it to do (mostly in regard to the shift in my own hobbies). Currently, it tends to find like-minded objects (or exact objects) from a photo on various sites (primary search source is Thingiverse) to print through the 3D printer (it only confirms and then proceeds to print). In the past, it used to be used as silly IRC bot that determined human behavior from keywords on channels (then compare based on levels of emotions to that of potential symptoms .. then compare symptoms to the DSM-IV).

This is all done in C++.


Sounds intense. Is it implemented as a small-scaled robot whose behavior is dependent on the current state of your AI system, or something along those lines lol?

lol And, do you have a blog or project page where you talk about it?


ninjitsuko wrote:
In the Past:
I grew up strictly on ASM x86. I wrote Linux drivers back when there wasn't a massive repository that you could download almost any you needed from. I'm still an Assembly coder, pure and true. It's just that it's hard to get additional input from people who barely understand ASM (usually college kids who took a three-week break from Java/C++ in a course to learn about inline ASM). Used to work for SAIC and coded quite a few underlying structures and applications in Assembly.


Hated x86, and I guess also all CISC instruction sets. But, I had to use x86 for a class I took as an undergraduate. lol Memory access way too convoluted for my liking. Much prefer the simplicity of MIPS lol, which is what I mainly use now in graduate school. Part of my work requires me to write low-level drivers for a library OS, and some assembly is needed.


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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/24/17
I am no computer scientists, I'm a philosophy major. But I hack my games by disassembling the machine code. So there are a bunch of small snipits of code that do small things like determine if a value is my health or someone else's, multiply numbers by other numbers, shift around numbers from registers to registers, and simply adding a bunch of nops.
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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/24/17
I'm mainly a web developer. HTML, CSS, JS, PHP, MYSQL/Maria. Also getting better and better at making stuff for linux, in shell, since its so much simpler than trying to make anything with windows.

I've built some websites/programs and databases for a couple companies. Replaced an old paper/yelling model with a system that tracks processes through the stages. Also created some simple to use XML editors for clients that have little to no computer knowledge but want to update their phone directory.

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Posted 1/23/17 , edited 1/24/17
I've used C and C++, but only in an academic setting and only at a basic level. I've used programming to solve math problems, but other than that I only a beginner and I am quite limited in what I can do with it. I'm hoping that once I get my engineering masters out of the way I can get back to bettering my programming skills.


TheLandOfGiants wrote:

Oh wow. A post I can directly relate to.


fredreload wrote:
I am currently using Python to get texts online and analyze the fashion trend. This is just one of the programs I've worked before.


Oh. I'm guessing the work you do revolves around pattern recognition/machine learning?



fredreload wrote:
I am always fond of 2D and 3D game production, but have never gotten into it. What programs have you worked on?


I primarily focus on firmware rather than applications that run on a general purpose computers. For instance, I'm writing in VHDL the description of a custom processor. But, in order to compile and run applications on it, I also write the low-level drivers with a mixture of C and assembly. I general, I tend program mostly in either C++ or C.

I find it somewhat funny there are a lot of STEM people on crunchy roll, by the way. Didn't really expect to find so many.



Finding nerdy math and science obsessed nerds on an anime forum? never
(another engineer here)
Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/24/17

TheLandOfGiants wrote:

So, I'm guessing that equals being able to send a greater range of sounds in real-time over the internet lol? I've had a class in digital communications and a few in data networks, so I'm at least familiar with VoIP and companding.


Normally, yes. Companding is more optimized and allows for encryption (sorta.. can't get too in-depth about this aspect for obvious reasons). Seeing as the infrastructure handles VoIP communication and that we normally have to communicate to outside networks that are mostly around G.711 and G.729, this is more of an internal protocol that's used either between customers or internal to their underlying infrastructure... if that makes any sense. (Vague for NDA purposes).


TheLandOfGiants wrote:
Sounds intense. Is it implemented as a small-scaled robot whose behavior is dependent on the current state of your AI system, or something along those lines lol?

lol And, do you have a blog or project page where you talk about it?


Sort of. I upload a photo to a specific folder on my gDrive - it pulls the image from that folder, scans various 3D blueprint sites for anything similar. If I'm at the computer, it'll display a confirmation window (as it's always running locally). Though, if I do not reject or confirm the print job at the computer - it'll send a text to me and seek confirmation from there.

As for the robotics aspect of my hobby project, it's pretty small scale at the moment. Its actions are dependent on the AI's algorithm and processes. It's not nearly as elaborate as some of the things I've seen. Admittedly, I haven't put in enough time recently. I feel that the software is apt and capable of moving from a digital platform to a more physical one (robotics). I just haven't had the time to tinker with making a larger scale robot or method. The AI can understand depth and surroundings (thanks to some of the newer advancements in this field and tinkering of my own).

I used to run a blog for all of it (mostly because people were using the AI's DSM-IV "silliness" on IRC servers). I'm thinking of adapting it for Discord ... but, that would be much after I find time to see what all I can do on the robotics side. If I undertake any large scale projects, I tend to make a short-term blog to follow progress when people are interested. They end up getting nuked when I lose interest or the people who were following/commented lose interest (usually happens around the same time).


TheLandOfGiants wrote:
Hated x86, and I guess also all CISC instruction sets. But, I had to use x86 for a class I took as an undergraduate. lol Memory access way too convoluted for my liking. Much prefer the simplicity of MIPS lol, which is what I mainly use now in graduate school. Part of my work requires me to write low-level drivers for a library OS, and some assembly is needed.


CISC is much more straight-forward and not as maddening in terms of memory access (as you've mentioned). It's more or less because of the hobbyists that I got involved with at a young age. I started reading Randall Hyde's "Art of Assembly" and went from there (before it was published as a novel - Hyde had a site up and running). Nowadays, it looks like he's jumped further into HLA (oh well). I find that ASM coders are treated as ancient gurus in some places.. in others, they're treated as outdated old men. It's why I kept to learning other languages as time went on as well.
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/24/17

ninjitsuko wrote:
Normally, yes. Companding is more optimized and allows for encryption (sorta.. can't get too in-depth about this aspect for obvious reasons). Seeing as the infrastructure handles VoIP communication and that we normally have to communicate to outside networks that are mostly around G.711 and G.729, this is more of an internal protocol that's used either between customers or internal to their underlying infrastructure... if that makes any sense. (Vague for NDA purposes).


I understand the gist of it, at least from a high level point of view lol. Didn't realize companding also involved encryption, though.


ninjitsuko wrote:
Sort of. I upload a photo to a specific folder on my gDrive - it pulls the image from that folder, scans various 3D blueprint sites for anything similar. If I'm at the computer, it'll display a confirmation window (as it's always running locally). Though, if I do not reject or confirm the print job at the computer - it'll send a text to me and seek confirmation from there.

As for the robotics aspect of my hobby project, it's pretty small scale at the moment. Its actions are dependent on the AI's algorithm and processes. It's not nearly as elaborate as some of the things I've seen. Admittedly, I haven't put in enough time recently. I feel that the software is apt and capable of moving from a digital platform to a more physical one (robotics). I just haven't had the time to tinker with making a larger scale robot or method. The AI can understand depth and surroundings (thanks to some of the newer advancements in this field and tinkering of my own).

I used to run a blog for all of it (mostly because people were using the AI's DSM-IV "silliness" on IRC servers). I'm thinking of adapting it for Discord ... but, that would be much after I find time to see what all I can do on the robotics side. If I undertake any large scale projects, I tend to make a short-term blog to follow progress when people are interested. They end up getting nuked when I lose interest or the people who were following/commented lose interest (usually happens around the same time).


Sounds like you're quite busy lol. Seems like an interesting project, though. Hope you get the chance to actually complete it, if it's something that can have an official end.

By the way, I tried googling "DSM-IV" to learn what that was. Correct me if I'm wrong, but does it have to do with mental health problems lol?


ninjitsuko wrote:
CISC is much more straight-forward and not as maddening in terms of memory access (as you've mentioned). It's more or less because of the hobbyists that I got involved with at a young age. I started reading Randall Hyde's "Art of Assembly" and went from there (before it was published as a novel - Hyde had a site up and running). Nowadays, it looks like he's jumped further into HLA (oh well). I find that ASM coders are treated as ancient gurus in some places.. in others, they're treated as outdated old men. It's why I kept to learning other languages as time went on as well.


Sorry to hear that, not that it's surprising, though. It seems to me one should never be too attached to one of even a few languages, only. With that said, I feel as though knowing C/C++ covers a lot lol.
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/24/17

kevz_210 wrote:
Finding nerdy math and science obsessed nerds on an anime forum? never
(another engineer here) ;)


I was genuinely surprised. o_o

Hello fellow engineer lol.
Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/24/17

TheLandOfGiants wrote:
I understand the gist of it, at least from a high level point of view lol. Didn't realize companding also involved encryption, though.


Technically, it doesn't. That's part of the tricky proprietary codec mixed with the unique infrastructure system that allows for encryption to be used as part of the process. It isn't "cross/back-compatible" with other codecs for this reason, and why it only works on our own infrastructure.


TheLandOfGiants wrote:
Sounds like you're quite busy lol. Seems like an interesting project, though. Hope you get the chance to actually complete it, if it's something that can have an official end.

By the way, I tried googling "DSM-IV" to learn what that was. Correct me if I'm wrong, but does it have to do with mental health problems lol?


It may never have an "official" end. I use the framework that I developed ages ago and expand on it or take parts of it to create something new.

As for the DSM-IV - yes, lol. Originally it was meant to determine if users in a particular IRC channel exhibited potential psychological issues based off of "emotional strength" values and correlation to emotions/thought processes/etc .. then compare all of these to create "symptoms" of the user. From there, it would correlate behavior + symptoms to potential mental illnesses. Mind you, it was never a project that was strictly designed to diagnose someone. It was originally designed for my benefit/curiosity. As I mentioned it to another chatter, they asked if they could do a "self-diagnosis" with the bot. From there, more and more people used it until I had a few ... mm, "false positives" when people began to take it literally (instead of just a silly bot).


TheLandOfGiants wrote:
Sorry to hear that, not that it's surprising, though. It seems to me one should never be too attached to one of even a few languages, only. With that said, I feel as though knowing C/C++ covers a lot lol.


That's the truest thing one can ever mention about coding. Staying to one particular language will, eventually, bite you in the behind. Sometimes it's nice to expand beyond the normal things you work with just so you have a vague understanding. Once a coder, always a coder - you should always be able to understand syntax after you pick up your first language. No matter the language, the underlying "process" kind of remains the same. It's more so how you get the application to perform said process that slightly shifts.
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17

ninjitsuko wrote:
It may never have an "official" end. I use the framework that I developed ages ago and expand on it or take parts of it to create something new.

As for the DSM-IV - yes, lol. Originally it was meant to determine if users in a particular IRC channel exhibited potential psychological issues based off of "emotional strength" values and correlation to emotions/thought processes/etc .. then compare all of these to create "symptoms" of the user. From there, it would correlate behavior + symptoms to potential mental illnesses. Mind you, it was never a project that was strictly designed to diagnose someone. It was originally designed for my benefit/curiosity. As I mentioned it to another chatter, they asked if they could do a "self-diagnosis" with the bot. From there, more and more people used it until I had a few ... mm, "false positives" when people began to take it literally (instead of just a silly bot).


xD Thanks for this explanation. I was trying to figure out the connection between AIs, DSM-IV, and silliness lol.

But, did your algorithm account for internet trolls lol? I feel like people on internet would always appear to have more symptoms of mental illness than in real life, hence a couple false positives.


ninjitsuko wrote:
That's the truest thing one can ever mention about coding. Staying to one particular language will, eventually, bite you in the behind. Sometimes it's nice to expand beyond the normal things you work with just so you have a vague understanding. Once a coder, always a coder - you should always be able to understand syntax after you pick up your first language. No matter the language, the underlying "process" kind of remains the same. It's more so how you get the application to perform said process that slightly shifts.


And there lies the difficulty in learning a new language today, I feel lol. Learning how to take advantage of those little details to make your code run faster... or preventing it from running hella slow. I'm looking at you MATLAB with your "everything needs to be vectorized (aka minimize for loops) to get respectable performance".
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