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Australia is just Collateral damage to trump
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21 / M / Bundaberg, Queens...
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/26/17
this article really just sums up some of the disgusting things we will suffer from due to trump being elected in the US


http://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/world-economy/trump-thumped-the-us-president-is-winding-up-to-hit-australia/news-story/4e321599590217e3329d072de06b34e3

I hope for a good outcome but things look grimm.

All in all it looks to be "improve America but fuck every other country because they don't matter"
This is part of the reason i was worried about Trump and would have preffered that bitch Hillary to have gone in place.

In my opinion there is helping your country and thats fine but when it means people all over the world have to suffer as a consequence i feel that is selfish.

I don't see public relations being well after all of this infact chances are Australians will probably start to see American people in a worse light (we already laugh at America alot when we talk about healthcare etc).

I remain to see only people thinking trump only impacts America however the scope is much wider and he has a responsibility to use his power wisely and not fuck over other countries in an attempt to save his own.
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23 / M / Massachusetts
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/26/17
For those of you who keep saying foreigners should but out of US affairs this is why you're being naive. What the United States does doesn't affect just the United States. We live in a globalized world and in spite of any wishful thinking that isn't going to change. Our country's decisions extend beyond us, have ramifications beyond us, and it's foolish to say that other country's should leave well enough alone and butt out of our affairs, because our affairs are not going to leave them well enough alone.

The world is too interconnected at this point. Our actions do not happen in a vacuum, they do not affect us alone. Actions have consequences, and American actions tend to have big, messy consequences.
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20 / M / Winnipeg, MB.
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17
Well to be fair it's not just australia, it's China, Japan, The UK, France, Canada, Mexico etc.

Expect the United States to be added to that list in due time.
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21 / M / Bundaberg, Queens...
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17

vanguard1234523 wrote:

For those of you who keep saying foreigners should but out of US affairs this is why you're being naive. What the United States does doesn't affect just the United States. We live in a globalized world and in spite of any wishful thinking that isn't going to change. Our country's decisions extend beyond us, have ramifications beyond us, and it's foolish to say that other country's should leave well enough alone and butt out of our affairs, because our affairs are not going to leave them well enough alone.

The world is too interconnected at this point. Our actions do not happen in a vacuum, they do not affect us alone. Actions have consequences, and American actions tend to have big, messy consequences.


Exactly this
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29 / M
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17
Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17
Meh
qwueri 
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32 / M / TN
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17
Global retraction won't cause an uproar in the US until it starts affecting exports/imports.
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17
In all honesty, I'm actually somewhat glad he pulled out of the Trans Pacific Partnership. That said, it's likely one of the only things he'll do that I'll actually consider a good thing. We don't need to become a xenophobic country like North Korea, and that is the direction he is taking the US.
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22 / M / Prison
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17

vanguard1234523 wrote:

For those of you who keep saying foreigners should but out of US affairs this is why you're being naive. What the United States does doesn't affect just the United States. We live in a globalized world and in spite of any wishful thinking that isn't going to change. Our country's decisions extend beyond us, have ramifications beyond us, and it's foolish to say that other country's should leave well enough alone and butt out of our affairs, because our affairs are not going to leave them well enough alone.

The world is too interconnected at this point. Our actions do not happen in a vacuum, they do not affect us alone. Actions have consequences, and American actions tend to have big, messy consequences.


I would also say it is a cheap way to shut someone down someone sharing their ideas, although may be different than are own, aren't necessarily based on ignorance caused by choice of residence.
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28 / M / Houma
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17
https://www.privateinternetaccess.com/blog/2017/01/tpp-ttip-gone-what-threat-comes-next/?utm_content=buffer56c02&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

I tend to agree with this slightly more in-depth look. Tariffs suck, but monopolies and overbearing copyrights suck harder.
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17
While australia exports a lot of product to a lot of countries (mainly raw metals etc) its mainly to asian nations. If you look at the data of exports to america and imports from america we important a SUBSTANTIAL amount more than we export. With trump saying he wants to provide some sort of benefit for companies exporting to other countries we will likely see a drop in prices for those imports which should actually be beneficial for our country. Our exports to other nations will remain unchanged as we still have our agreements with them...

Im not on the doom and gloom train here sorry.
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20 / M / Palm Coast, Florida
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17
It's not the end of the Australia...
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17

MonoDreams wrote:

It's not the end of the Australia...


Though if it were, I would get the leather jackets and spike adorned vehicles ready.
Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/25/17
Our markets finished well last night.
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30 / M / Murica
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Posted 1/24/17 , edited 1/26/17
Alright, I'm going to analyze the blog post then:


"It’s a war on trade. His first victim was the Trans Pacific Partnership, which he killed on the first day in office. Great. It was a dog’s breakfast — as much a tangle of rules and limitations as anything worthwhile.

But Mr Trump is not finished. He wants to go a lot further in his attack on trade and he has a detailed plan. Australia is just collateral damage to him. He doesn’t give a damn if we get hurt."


I think this part is a little bit exaggerated. If it was a 'war', it would be a blockade and all the U.S. would have to do to win is get an army of Emus to attack the Aussies. The TPP was bad for all nations. Obama had to remove a part of the trade deal with regarding that no nation that harbors slavery shall be part of this group, which Malaysia protested and ended up convincing Obama to overturn that section.


"TRADE IS GOOD*

Trade is a massive part of Australia’s economy. If you know anyone who works in tourism or mining, tertiary education or agriculture, you probably know someone who owes their job to trade.

Australia needs trade. We’re just not a huge country, so we need to buy a lot of things in and sell things out. It is worth remembering imports are important to Australia too.

Buying Australian made is fine when we make a good version of the thing in question, but who’d buy an Australian-made iPhone, for example? Imports help us get stuff we never could have obtained otherwise at better prices than if we made it ourselves.

As this next chart shows, we often import more than we export."


In this part of the article. There really isn't a hint at why the current trade deals with the U.S. or Australia are 'good'. No data to back it up. But also in the last paragraph, what does a factory producing Iphones in China have to do with trade with the United States?

I would agree in principle trade is good, but in practice you can get really bad trade deals. This guy is just making an argument that trade is good for the sake of trading. It has nothing to do with whether or not trade deals between the U.S. and Aussie land are good, nor has he pinpointed any actual trade deals, besides the TPP, which was bad.

I'm more than certin I can find some far left people that would argue that unfair trade and shoe shops are bad, or believe in 'fair trade'.


"The evidence is pretty clear that trade makes you better off. Certainly when countries aren’t allowed to trade, they rapidly fall apart.

North Korea is the shining example of the folly of self-sufficiency, with Cuba and Venezuela as other salient examples. China was totally impoverished til the 1980s when it gave up on Chairman Mao’s crazy ideas and started to become the trading superpower it is today.

Whitlam first cut our tariffs back in the 1970s and started Australia on the path to being one of the most trade-friendly countries in the world. This coincided with Australia shooting up the rankings in terms of wealth."


This writer is really going off the wall. I want you to keep in mind, that there hasn't been a single source or single point at which Trump has stated he will stop trading with Australia. The only trade deal that keeps popping up is TPP. This is just a hunch, but this person might be a supporter of TPP, whom didn't even read about what god awful rules that trade deal would have brought. I would agree that 'smart trade' and 'fair trade' is good for a nation, but not always. If you have unfair competition which damages working class jobs, for goods of lower quality, then trade isn't good. The Islamic Republic of Iran has the highest trade tariff, but they also have a moderate economy compared to most middle east nations, being the 3rd largest economy of the middle east. Dependency on trade doesn't automatically create greater wealth.


"TRUMP SLUMP

Trump’s antitrade vendetta has several parts:

1. He’s promised a big border tax for any American firm that tries to move part of their operations overseas.

2. He’s also promised to take America out of the North American Free Trade Agreement, which would be a massive shock.

3. Threatening a trade war with China.

All of these are big, but the last one is the biggest, because it would probably blow up global trade."

Disregard these argument and only ask: What does this have to do with Trade Relations with the U.S. and Aussie land? How is trump anti-trade if the only evidence being forth put is about the TPP?


"The whole picture matters, for example, we sell a lot of stuff to China that they make into something they sell to Vietnam, where it is transformed for export again. We can’t expect a trade war to go on and just sit and watch. We’re part of it, the moment it starts.

The organisation that monitors international trade is already nervous. The WTO says the number of new trade restrictive measures being introduced is “worryingly high” and could hurt job creation.

Think of global trade like a stream that powers the mill that is the Australian economy. Global trade keeps our wheels turning. So when Trump threatens to reduce the stream of global trade, we are at risk of grinding to a halt. Our economy has already got problems and nobody wants to see Aussie companies lay off workers."


Still, there is no evidence being brought forth that killing the TPP is going to hurt Australian jobs. You can't force another nation to trade with another nation, that violates their sovereignty as a nation. In regards to the whole "The WTO says the number of new trade restritive measures being introduced is "worryingly high"" is being argued, he makes no reference to Donald Trump or his policy.


"*YEAH, OKAY. TRADE CAN BE BAD

Eagle eyed readers will have noticed the asterisk earlier. This is where we admit things are a bit more complex. Trade is good, on average. But that doesn’t mean it helps all the people, all the time.

Sometimes it hurts certain regions. Certain industries. Readers in northern Adelaide know all too well what I’m talking about. Sometimes those regions and industries never recover, and the people who live and work in them have lives that are really genuinely worse than they would have been otherwise.

But with the car companies moving out of Australia, it is going to be easier to help Adelaide in a world of lots of trade, not a world of increasing isolation.

The head of the RBA said in 2016 that increasing isolation “would be costly for the US and very costly for us … Of the things that I worry about that’s probably right at the top of the list.”

The best chance we have is if Trump’s popularity keeps falling. If his popularity slides, he’s less and less likely to be able to do what he says he wants to do. Even members of Congress from Trump’s own party won’t want to co-operate with an unpopular President. They can sniff the wind and they’ve got elections in two years.

Hopefully Trump’s antitrade war stops after the first battle, and we can all breathe easy."


In this whole series of paragraphs, he concedes to my points and contradicts his entire point. Literally no trade sources, besides TPP that was a bad trade deal to begin with.

Either this writer is dishonest or simply paranoid. The amount of fallacies I could sting this guy on is absurdly high.


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