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Post Reply When do you consider yourself a writer?
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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 1/30/17 , edited 2/13/17
So, when do you consider yourself a writer? Is it the first time you get published? The first time you get paid for your words? Can you only consider yourself a writer when there’s a book on a shelf with your name on the spine? Or is it more a matter of attitude and determination? Does the simple act of writing—and believing it means something—make one a writer?



Thinking about it, I wonder if I can really call myself a writer. I mean I love to write but I feel like I'm not at the point where I should even consider myself a writer. It's a little confusing. Anyway, what do you think?
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Posted 1/30/17
when I write things. im a writher rightn ow
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24 / M / Scotland
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Posted 1/30/17
I mean anyone can be a writer but I would deem a professional writer as someone who makes a living from whatever they write.
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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 1/30/17

HateKillingCamels wrote:

when I write things. im a writher rightn ow


Anyone can write a story if they try. Does that really make them a writer?
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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 1/30/17

HaitchE wrote:

I mean anyone can be a writer but I would deem a professional writer as someone who makes a living from whatever they write.


Makes sense.
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Posted 1/30/17

qualeshia3 wrote:

Anyone can write a story if they try. Does that really make them a writer?


Yeah lol, it's not some exclusive club thing to be a "writer". No qualifications, no nothing, if you say you're a writer you are one.
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49 / M / New England, USA
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Posted 1/30/17 , edited 1/30/17
A Writer - as others stated is anyone who tries their hand at writing.

A Good Writer - once you're read and others call you a Good Writer, you are one.

A Professional Writer - first time you're paid for your work or someone buys your work. Years ago you had to be signed by a publishing house to be called a Professional Writer or at least sign a freelance writing contract, nowadays all it takes is self-publishing an ebook/kindle book to become one.
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M / England
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Posted 1/30/17
When I passed my A Level Creative Writing.
But mostly I agree with neugenx


neugenx wrote:

A Writer - as others stated is anyone who tries their hand at writing.

A Good Writer - once you're read and others call you a Good Writer, you are one.

A Professional Writer - first time you're paid for your work or someone buys your work. Years ago you had to be signed by a publishing house to be called a Professional Writer or at least sign a freelance writing contract, nowadays all it takes is self-publishing an ebook/kindle book to become one.


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When more money rolls in than rolls out, forever.
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Posted 1/30/17
Once you've put a word or a sentence down on paper you are effectively a writer. Your success really depends upon your goals. If you're just writing for pleasure and for yourself then I'd say once you start writing you're a success. If you finish your work then you're extremely successful. I can't stress enough how important it is to finish what you start. Not only will it give you the confidence you need going forward but there's a lot of pleasure to be had in finishing a project. If you wish to get published then it's a whole different matter. Also if you want to make a living by writing then that can change things. To be a successful published author you need a bit of talent, a bit of hard work and a bit of luck. It just really depends on why you're writing, who you're writing for and what your goals are.

Now with that said I don't really consider myself a writer because I hardly ever finish anything. I primarily write for pleasure and to expel certain demons that like to take root in my mind and so I consider myself successful at meeting my goals but I also have longer term goals that I want to work towards like A. Becoming a better writer and B. Possibly publishing something some day but in order to do so I have to finish what I start and I have to set more boundaries. The single most important thing I've learned while writing is that you HAVE to be consistent with your work ethic. You HAVE to set so many hours aside a day and just write. Six hours, eight hours, whatever. You have to create good habits and stick to them. It's rare for people to just write an hour or two a day and be highly successful but it's not out of the realm of possibility.

Also if you do self publish for the love of God hire a real editor. Their job isn't just to be a spell checker, it's also to help your story have a better flow. Don't hire one of these fake online editors like you see people doing on Amazon. Spend the time and money on a real one. Check their resume carefully. Your book is your baby so treat it with the love it deserves. Don't try to build a house without a foundation.
Also spend the money on a good cover. That will be the very first thing that draws people to your book. Any moron can stick a stock photo on something and call it a book and it just screams of laziness and sloppiness. Hire a professional artist and create the image that you want to be on your cover. Make sure it's jumps out and grabs people's attention.

Mainly though, just practice practice practice. That's the only way you get better. If you're writing for the money then I'd say you're in the wrong business. If you write because you love it and are fortunate enough to make some money doing what you love then you're in the right place. You can definitely tell the real authors from all the dime a dozen hacks who want to just make a quick buck. It reflects in the poor quality of their work. We've all read those horrible self published books on Amazon that have no right calling themselves a book. I've also been fortunate enough to read many great self published books from authors such as High Howey who wrote Wool (the Silo Series) or Jason Brant author of The Hunger series, Ash and The Dark. Then there's the ever prolific Elle Casey who somehow manages to churn out books at an astonishing rate and still do a great job in the editing department. If you're looking for an author who can write a little bit of everything then you could do far worse than her. I'd highly recommend: Apocalypsis for some dystopian goodness or War of the Fae for some insanely fun fantasy. Don't Make me Beautiful was very good too but a bit hard to read because of the subject matter.

There's a lot of other great authors out there too. I always like mentioning my favorite independent authors because it's never a bad thing to read their books and to compare what you're doing to what they're doing. Their success proves that you can also be successful if that's what you want plus it's just fun reading.
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Posted 1/30/17 , edited 1/30/17

qualeshia3 wrote:

So, when do you consider yourself a writer? Is it the first time you get published? The first time you get paid for your words? Can you only consider yourself a writer when there’s a book on a shelf with your name on the spine? Or is it more a matter of attitude and determination? Does the simple act of writing—and believing it means something—make one a writer?



Thinking about it, I wonder if I can really call myself a writer. I mean I love to write but I feel like I'm not at the point where I should even consider myself a writer. It's a little confusing. Anyway, what do you think?

Anyone can be a writer, but being a professional writer different story.
Having a few degrees under your belt would most likely make it more creditable.
Depending on what topic you write about.
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24 / M / Going Into j.D
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Posted 1/30/17
I'd argue that it's when you finish a book of some length, that's when you're a writer. To that end, it really only matters, I think, that people beyond yourself read what you write.
Posted 1/30/17
probably when you make money from writing, in my opinion.
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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 1/30/17
Good comments.
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26 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 1/30/17

TheOriginalStraynge wrote:

Once you've put a word or a sentence down on paper you are effectively a writer. Your success really depends upon your goals. If you're just writing for pleasure and for yourself then I'd say once you start writing you're a success. If you finish your work then you're extremely successful. I can't stress enough how important it is to finish what you start. Not only will it give you the confidence you need going forward but there's a lot of pleasure to be had in finishing a project. If you wish to get published then it's a whole different matter. Also if you want to make a living by writing then that can change things. To be a successful published author you need a bit of talent, a bit of hard work and a bit of luck. It just really depends on why you're writing, who you're writing for and what your goals are.

Now with that said I don't really consider myself a writer because I hardly ever finish anything. I primarily write for pleasure and to expel certain demons that like to take root in my mind and so I consider myself successful at meeting my goals but I also have longer term goals that I want to work towards like A. Becoming a better writer and B. Possibly publishing something some day but in order to do so I have to finish what I start and I have to set more boundaries. The single most important thing I've learned while writing is that you HAVE to be consistent with your work ethic. You HAVE to set so many hours aside a day and just write. Six hours, eight hours, whatever. You have to create good habits and stick to them. It's rare for people to just write an hour or two a day and be highly successful but it's not out of the realm of possibility.

Also if you do self publish for the love of God hire a real editor. Their job isn't just to be a spell checker, it's also to help your story have a better flow. Don't hire one of these fake online editors like you see people doing on Amazon. Spend the time and money on a real one. Check their resume carefully. Your book is your baby so treat it with the love it deserves. Don't try to build a house without a foundation.
Also spend the money on a good cover. That will be the very first thing that draws people to your book. Any moron can stick a stock photo on something and call it a book and it just screams of laziness and sloppiness. Hire a professional artist and create the image that you want to be on your cover. Make sure it's jumps out and grabs people's attention.

Mainly though, just practice practice practice. That's the only way you get better. If you're writing for the money then I'd say you're in the wrong business. If you write because you love it and are fortunate enough to make some money doing what you love then you're in the right place. You can definitely tell the real authors from all the dime a dozen hacks who want to just make a quick buck. It reflects in the poor quality of their work. We've all read those horrible self published books on Amazon that have no right calling themselves a book. I've also been fortunate enough to read many great self published books from authors such as High Howey who wrote Wool (the Silo Series) or Jason Brant author of The Hunger series, Ash and The Dark. Then there's the ever prolific Elle Casey who somehow manages to churn out books at an astonishing rate and still do a great job in the editing department. If you're looking for an author who can write a little bit of everything then you could do far worse than her. I'd highly recommend: Apocalypsis for some dystopian goodness or War of the Fae for some insanely fun fantasy. Don't Make me Beautiful was very good too but a bit hard to read because of the subject matter.

There's a lot of other great authors out there too. I always like mentioning my favorite independent authors because it's never a bad thing to read their books and to compare what you're doing to what they're doing. Their success proves that you can also be successful if that's what you want plus it's just fun reading.



Do you like to write because you really go all out with your comments?

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