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Post Reply Cooking 101-- The beginner Guide- Simple Recipes
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25 / F / California
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17
Cooking is my hobby, I cook mostly Asian food: Japanese, Korean, Indonesian, Thai, Chinese, and Vietnamese. Here's an easy Japanese curry recipe that I often make. If you don't want to make your own curry roux you can just use the store-bought one (most popular brand is S&B), though of course the home-made one will taste better.


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YOUR MIND
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17
Take 2 tablespoons of boring male character.
Add female love interests to taste.
Stir in 12 oz of feelings.
Season with bouncing titties and/or underwear scenes.

Yummy! You just made an anime!
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28 / F / Praries of Canada
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17
I don't have any recipes off hand but here are a few pointers:

- Do not put metal in the microwave, not even plates with a metal engraving on them
- If a recipe calls for sour milk you can add a bit of vinegar to regular milk, you do not have to go out and buy sour milk
- Do not leave cookies on a hot cookie sheet...they will keep cooking due to the heat
- If your are broiling something leave the oven door open a little bit and be careful not do set your oven mitts on fire when you pull it out because broiling uses the top burner (my mom has done this several times and she is a good cook)
- Instead of making pasta sauce for pizza you can use a jar of spaghetti sauce instead
- If you freeze something in the freezer make sure there is room for expansion in the container first
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24 / M / Abyss
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17


These are a few dishes I have made. The first is Bolognese sauce for spaghetti, the second sideways one is nabiyaki udon, the one underneath it is tofu and chicken Japanese curry (homemade, no store bought roux) next is chicken marsala, the last is a vegetarian dish I made up.

I will PM the recipes for anyone who wants them. Mind you, most of these take over 1.5 hours to make, only the chicken marsala is a quick dish.
Ejanss 
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17

Haru_no_hana wrote:
JAPANESE BEEF CURRY RECIPE
(snip)


And ironically, Curry is what Japanese schoolgirls on shoujo series make when they don't know how to cook...
Ejanss 
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17

Hydroglyph wrote:
- If a recipe calls for sour milk you can add a bit of vinegar to regular milk, you do not have to go out and buy sour milk


I generally wait till the milk goes sour anyway--which, since I'm only one guy with a half gallon every week, and a local market to get it from, happens more often than I'd like--before using any recipe that calls for Sour Milk.

Or Buttermilk, which is essentially the same thing, when making chocolate cake, pancakes, or certain Bread Machine recipes.
(Happens so often, in fact, I sometimes seal up the dry ingredients for a from-scratch chocolate cake in sealer-bags, so that I have "instant cake mixes" ready for whenever the milk goes bad. Just add hot coffee, eggs, oil/applesauce, and bad milk. )
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24 / M / Abyss
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17

Ejanss wrote:


Haru_no_hana wrote:
JAPANESE BEEF CURRY RECIPE
(snip)


And ironically, Curry is what Japanese schoolgirls on shoujo series make when they don't know how to cook...


What they use is "store bought" curry. You get all the spices and roux in a hard block. All you do is cut up the vegetables, add water and roux and cook it (or if you want meat add it before veggies in a hot oiled pot). The block will melt into curry sauce and then you just cook some rice.

Store bought curry takes all of 15 minutes to make (minus rice). What he showed you is homemade curry which takes a lot longer to make. My recipe is similar to his and takes about 2 hours. What he didn't add is that in most cases you need to make your own garam masala. That takes time on its own. It is a blend of about 8 different spices.
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23 / M / Spokane, Washingt...
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17
I'm not much of a cook, so i got some perfect advice for a beginner cook that I wish i followed sooner.

The KISS rule. Keep It Simple Stupid.

your not Sebastion. Don't you dare think of trying that chocolate curry buns. just do a grilled cheese instead, everyone would thank you for it instead of making a mysterious lump of something like I did. 8*I

also rice goes with everything if you got a decent rice cooker.

finally, my recipe that I use whenever i actually feel like cooking.

Krazy **** Katsu Khicken. (not racist whatsoever, just a coincidence. and absolutely no relation to KFC too.)

Chicken breasts
Panko
Eggs
Flour
Cooking oil
A hammer. (yes, your reading that right)
Recomended.
willingness to clean up everything in the vicinity of you
a second pair of hands

Shout random hammer related battle quotes, such as "By Odin's beard!" or "Can't touch this".
Hammer the chicken flat. Batter in egg, flour and panko. set aside for second pair of hands to fry.

fry for about 5-8 minutes, depending on size. Don't let your guard down, stuff cooks quick and burns quicker.

optional, slice each katsu chicken into strips and serve on a bed of rice with some katsu sauce.
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17
I have a very simple recipe for chicken teriyaki that even my kitchen inept husband can make by himself (if he can find the ingredients in the cupboard!)

The ingredients are enough for two servings. You can easily double the recipe for more people, I tend to do this when I am cooking because I like cold leftover chicken for my lunch.

Recipe: Chicken Teriyaki

Ingredients:
1/4 a cup of Mirin (A sweet rice wine you can find in the ethnic section of most major groceries Occasionally I replace this with pineapple juice.)
2 tablespoons of Sake or cooking sherry ( If you are not old enough to buy alcohol you can skip this and replace with an equal amount of water, it wont taste the same but it will still work.)
2 Tablespoons of soy sauce (I use kikkoman brand, you could also use tamari.)
1 Tablespoon of sugar (I use honey sometimes, or brown sugar, but regular white is perfectly fine as well.)
2 chicken breasts or thighs (Preferable without bones or skin, but if its all you have it will work fine too.)
Salt and pepper to taste, (I use about 1/8 a teaspoon or salt and about 1/4 teaspoon of pepper)
2 teaspoons of cooking oil to grease the pan (I like to use either olive oil or coconut oil, but any cooking oil works.)
Optional ingredients; Fresh ground ginger, garlic, green onions, chili flakes. I like to add about 1/2 a teaspoon of garlic and ginger to my sauce. I use the sliced green onion and chili flakes to garnish.

Method:

Step one: Combine the mirin and sake in a small saucepan. Heat over medium-low for 5 minutes, then add the soy sauce and sugar. Stir until dissolved. Adjust the heat to low for 10 minutes, until the sauce reduced by about a third and thickened a little bit. There should be a very generous 1/4 cup. Set aside the sauce to cool and concentrate.

Step Two: Rinse and pat the chicken dry with paper towel. Poke it a few times with a toothpick or fork to let flavors penetrate into the meat better. Sprinkle with salt and pepper on the meat. Heat a medium sized skillet over medium heat. Add the cooking oil. Cook the meat for 3 minutes, or until a little golden underneath. Turn each piece over, lower the heat to medium-low or low, then cover; you want a gently hiss when the meat hits the pan. Cook for 8 minutes, or until just cooked through. If you want to you can cook it for a bit longer if the meat is really thick.

Step Three: Add the sauce, pouring it over the chicken. Turn the ,eat to cover the chicken in the sauce, increase the heat to medium. Let the chicken cook in the bubbling sauce for 3 to 5 minutes, turning often and moving it around the pan, until the sauce has coated the chicken with a reddish-brown gloss. The pan will be have some fat from the chicken as well as the cooked down dark-colored teriyaki sauce. It will look shiny and brown.

Step Four: Transfer the chicken and any remaining sauce to a plate and let cool for 5 minutes. Cut across the grain,making sure your meat is completely cooked and there is no pink left. Arrange the meat on a plate and garnish with a sprinkling of green onion and/or chili flakes. Serve with rice and boiled vegetables. I like to use heat and serve rice or minute rice. I use carrots, cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower as my side vegetables.

I hope you guys like this recipe and that it is not to complicated.



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(´◔౪◔)✂❤
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17
Visit the tasty channel on youtube, very simple video recipes that all look delicious:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJFp8uSYCjXOMnkUyb3CQ3Q

My advice for beginners is to cook something that require very little ingredient and no spices that you don't already have.
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36 / M / SoFlo
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17

Metallionmoose wrote:







This sounds very similar to my chicken wing recipe I posted on the first page. The soy sauce and sugar go great together. Perfect blend of sweet & salty.
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24 / M / Iowa, but station...
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17
Look for "Tasty" on facebook. Alot of easy pasta dishes lol
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33 / M / USA
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17
I only ever really learned how to make chocolate stuff.

Really simple ganache recipe

Ingredients:
* ~10oz bag of good dark chocolate chips. I recommend Ghirardelli 60% for this (conveniently 10oz bags).
* Half pint of heavy cream, manufacturing cream, or heavy whipping cream (not whipped cream!). You can usually find exactly this size in stores.

Stuff you need:
* Stove
* small pot
* medium bowl, like large cereal bowl sized. 2+cup measuring cup also works

Process

1. pour the chocolate chips into a bowl that's big enough to fit them with some extra space. Think like you're pouring a bowl of cereal and how much extra space you'd normally have for that. A pyrex measuring cup also works well, which is what I use.

2. In a small pot, bring the heavy cream nearly to boil (just until it first starts to bubble a little) over medium heat. Stir every now and then while it's heating up so you don't scald the cream on the bottom. This will be quick, so don't leave the pot!

3. Pour heavy cream over bowl of chocolate chips. Let it sit there until the chocolate chips on top become shiny (this means they've melted). This should take a few minutes. Stir until you have a homogenous shiny chocolatey goodness. I recommend a flat rubber spatula for this, but a normal spoon or even a fork works.

Storage

Wrap in plastic wrap and put in the fridge once it's at room temp. Reheat over a hot water bath, being careful not to let it touch the bottom of the pot and not let any water into your ganache. I store mine in a measuring cup, because I can use the handle to hang it over the side of pot without it touching the bottom.

Recommended usage

Use this in place of frosting or as fondue. Trust me, this makes super good fondue. Dip big marshmallows in it. It is ridiculous. Ganache will set up when cooled, but it will still be very soft and will melt in your hands. I've used this to half-dip chocolate cookies. I've also dipped marshmallows in it, and let it setup. You're going to want to refrigerate whatever you're dipping, though. I put the stuff on aluminum foil on a baking sheet, and put that in the fridge for a while. The ganache will turn matte once it's cooled.
qwueri 
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17
For someone beginning cooking, I'd recommend something relatively simple to prepare, cooks with a forgiving time, and flexible to adjust to taste. Soups, pasta + sauce, single dish oven/crockpot meals. The hard part is usually getting the proper feel for timing and seasoning (always start out with small amounts of spices and add additional in small increments, removing spices once they've been added is usually not possible).

Roasted Lemon Chicken:
Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.
Take two thawed chicken thighs place them in an oven safe glass cooking dish. Lightly rub with olive oil, a quarter teaspoon each of salt, pepper, dried rosemary, basil, and onion powder, and a drop of lemon juice. Cover the dish with the glass top to the dish or crimp aluminum foil over the top to keep it from drying. Cook in the oven for approximately an hour, the skin should be crispy and the meat should have no pink around the bone when you cut into it. You can use the same amount of seasoning and oil to roast a few quartered potatoes and medium thickness carrot slices in another glass dish.


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33 / M / USA
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Posted 1/31/17 , edited 2/9/17
My brownie recipe

Ingredients:

* 2 oz unsweetened chocolate (recommended: Baker's)
* 1 stick (4oz) salted butter
* 2 large eggs
* 1 cup sugar
* 3/4 cup flour

Stuff you need:

* Oven
* stove
* 8"x8" pan
* rubber spatula

Process

1. Preheat over to 350F
2. In a pot on low heat, melt butter completely.
3. Melt unsweetened chocolate in butter. Stir occasionally. The chocolate can get stuck to the bottom, but the melted butter should help.
4. grease 8x8 pan with butter wrapper. I guess other stuff works too
5. Take pot off heat. Pour in sugar. Mix this together, preferably with rubber spatula. Keep stirring until it's all combined. Note that the sugar will not melt, and it will look grainy. This is OK.
6. You will need to work somewhat quickly from this step onward, because the mixture is hot. Crack the eggs into pot and mix until all is combined and homogenous. It shouldn't be grainy anymore and should be kinda thin and sticky.
5. Sift in the flour and mix only until just combined. Do not overmix! This takes practice to get right. Resulting mixture will be fairly thick.
6. pour into a greased 8"x8" pan, scraping down the sides of the pot with the rubber spatula
7. Bake 30 minutes.

Semi-optional step:
* While cooling, pour chocolate chips over top, enough to cover something like half or slightly more. You'll want a good 1/4-1/2 of a bag of chocolate chips for this. They will melt if you let them sit for a few minutes. Spread with a knife. If you don't fully cover it, just add more and let them melt. The goal is to form a seal over the top. This keeps it moist longer. While melted, it's tasty. When it's cool, the chocolate will harden somewhat, but I've found it won't get fully hard. I ALWAYS put some kind of chocolate on top. When I make ganache, I use that. You could also coarsely chop up some andes mints. That's super good too.

Some optional stuff:
* Pour half the batter into the pan, then place down two flat chocolate bars of your choice (recommend Ghirardelli bars for this, but with the corners broken off), then the other half of the batter. Bake as normal.
* Before mixing in flour, pour in some chocolate chips, M&Ms, or andes mints. Really, any small chocolate or candy type thing will work. Do this *before* adding flour to avoid overmixing.
* Definitely do NOT add pretzels to batter before baking. They just end up stale and gross. Chocolate covered pretzels might work, but I haven't had a chance to try this.

Storage:

Wrap in plastic wrap and put in the fridge once cooled to room temp. You can nuke the brownies and they're still good like that. I like them cold, though.
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