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Post Reply Cooking 101-- The beginner Guide- Simple Recipes
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Posted 2/1/17
Split pea Dal

Split peas
chopped garlic
1 garlic clove
chopped onion
1tbl oil
salt
Curry powder or (fenugreek, cumin, chilli, ginger, tumeric, coriander seeds and or finely chopped fresh coriander, thyme dried and powdered or if you wish you can grind your own optional extra spices to add are black pepper and all spice)

Rinse peas and put them in water with the clove of garlic to cook. When peas are cooked soft start making the curry roux. Mix the ground curry with a little water to make a paste. Now heat up a pan with the oil, add the chopped onion, sauté then add the garlic next put the curry paste mix in and stir. Transfer the roux to the pot with the peas then simmer until the peas are mushy. Add salt to taste. Serve with white rice or roti or whatever flat bread you have available or even garlic bread. This dal can be cooked in 30 minutes.

For a variation you can also make chick pea dal. This takes longer though and you add in chopped potatoes when you're adding the curry roux to the peas.

Ejanss 
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Posted 2/1/17 , edited 2/1/17

wrote:

Anybody have some buttered toast recipes? That is my level ATM


For every guy who claims he can't make anything but a grilled cheese sandwich--
Have you tried mixing the cheese, and throwing a slice of Provolone, Swiss or Gruyere into the mix? Bacon and tomato? Artisan bread, from your local snooty-market?

Recipes are easy, but creativity makes champions.
elinel 
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Posted 2/1/17
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLr1A8WQbpv2DOgeap98YoWuOq0BdBib8d

Quick and easy, lots of korean recipes
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Posted 2/1/17
Oh, I almost forgot ... this guys recipes rawk and are easy to do ...

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsWpnu6EwIYDvlHoOESpwYg
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Posted 2/1/17
I made fried rice, but this time, instead of rice, I used baked potato wedges. Who has patience for pressure cooking beans or slow-cooking rice? and Russian ppl can't grow rice.
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Posted 2/1/17 , edited 2/1/17
Here's a recipe for Pizzelles (Italian Cookies)

Ingredients:

6 eggs
1/2 pound of butter-melted
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
2 cups of sugar
1/2 cup of cooking oil
1/2 cup of milk
5 cups of flour
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp anise seeds or 2 tsp of anise extract
*optional* Powder sugar

Steps:

Step 1: Mix egges, butter, sugar, milk, oil, and lemon juice in a bowl.

Step 2: In the same bowl, mix the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and anise seeds/extract.

Step 3: Press down the batter in a pizzelle iron for 30-60 seconds (some models will flash a light once ready)
You can find one here: https://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-WM-PZ2-Pizzelle-Press/dp/B00006F2ME/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1485992798&sr=8-1&keywords=pizzelle+iron

Step 4: Place cookies on a cooling rack.

Optional Once cookies are cool, powder the cookies with the powdered sugar.

Cookies should look like this once done:

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Posted 2/1/17 , edited 2/1/17
This is a very simple recipe for breakfast time:

Egg in a Hole

Ingredients

1 egg
1 slice of bread
1 tablespoon of butter

Directions

1) Melt the butter in a frying pan on medium heat.
2) Cut a circle into the bread.
3) Place the bread in the frying pan (both pieces).
4) Crack the egg into the hole and fry for roughly 30 - 45 seconds on each side or until the egg is as done as you like. Be sure to give the same treatment to your piece of mini toast as well.
5) Remove from frying pan. Put whatever the heck you want on your egg and mini toast and enjoy!
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Posted 2/1/17


i have to be honest here... i had to look up a picture since i had a different image of "egg in a hole" in mind when i read your post


this looks easy enough.. our backyard chickens will provide the eggs..

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Posted 2/1/17
okay but the recipes on original post don't look simple
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Posted 2/1/17

Sogno- wrote:

okay but the recipes on original post don't look simple


i collect recipes from magazines to share them with others..

personally.. i always pick simple recipes to work on..
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Posted 2/1/17 , edited 2/2/17
1. PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR TOOLS. You should be using the proper one for each task. For instance, don't use a steel spatula with a thin pan with teflon coating. Do not use a thin, sharp slicer as a boning knife. Do not use glass cutting boards. Do not use excessive heat for long periods when using copper pots. Etc.

2. Understand that even if a hundred people follow a recipe exactly, you will still have differences in your completed dishes. Cooking processes and variable heat settings on everyone's stoves will result in differences. You need to learn how different ingredients react to different methods of prep. You need to understand why one dish is different from another even though the same recipe was used. You will often need to adjust the amount of stuff in each recipe to account for differences in your kitchen and also to make the dish more suitable for your tastes.

3. Temperature control is king. And don't forget your pot/pan has a lid. Use it to minimize cleanup and to help the steam remain in the pot/pan. You can cook things more evenly and more quickly when you cover the container, in many cases.

4. Understand that a lot of how food tastes has to do with your sense of smell. This is why you often will cook something and then it's not quite so appetizing an hour later when you're done. As you are exposed to the smell of the ingredients, you become desensitized to it so your food won't taste as good to you as it might to other people.

5. Ingredient quality matters. How you cut them can also affect their flavor.

6. Do not dunk something covered in water into hot oil. Always pat meat and fish dry after rinsing if you plan to cook them in oil. For veggies, shake off excess water and have the lid ready so that you can dump the veggies in fast and cover the pot/pan quickly.

7. When in doubt, assume it is hot. Use common sense and more care when working with heat. Don't be silly by doing things like seeing if a glass casserole is hot by touching it.

8. Plan ahead. Especially for recipes requiring you to do multiple things. Forgetting something or putting something in too late can affect how good your finished dish is.

9. Learn how to correct your mistakes when you make them so that you can save a messed up dish or make it into something else. This will ultimately save you time and ingredients, and it will teach you a lot about how ingredients and flavors interact.

10. Keep in mind that the essence of cooking is not merely following recipes. To truly cook, you should have an understanding of ingredients' flavors and traits and how they interact. This takes time and everyone will continue to learn throughout their lifetimes. If you want to get good, start doing it now. Don't be afraid to try making new things and new recipes. The more you do it, the better you get. But remember your mistakes and learn from them.

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Posted 2/2/17 , edited 2/5/17
Wasabi tuna deviled eggs-- this is something i can do




i got lobster tails from Albertson's

any good receipes with lobster tails?



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Posted 2/6/17

dulun18 wrote:


i got lobster tails from Albertson's

any good receipes with lobster tails?





wild caught? that's a pretty good price!

easy level recipe here

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Posted 2/6/17

Morbidhanson wrote:

9. Learn how to correct your mistakes when you make them so that you can save a messed up dish or make it into something else. This will ultimately save you time and ingredients, and it will teach you a lot about how ingredients and flavors interact.

10. Keep in mind that the essence of cooking is not merely following recipes. To truly cook, you should have an understanding of ingredients' flavors and traits and how they interact. This takes time and everyone will continue to learn throughout their lifetimes. If you want to get good, start doing it now. Don't be afraid to try making new things and new recipes. The more you do it, the better you get. But remember your mistakes and learn from them.



That is the level I want to reach eventually. My reasons for learning to cook require that I get there someday. I really want to be able to take what I have on hand, or what's on sale- regardless of what that is- and figure out what I can do to make a meal out of it. I want to do that so I can eat cheaper, and so that I waste less food. I figure I get rid of too many vegetables when I buy some for a recipe right now, but then there's leftover ingredients that I'm not really sure how to use. I want to be able to cook without recipes for my own satisfaction as well; just to be able to make good food for myself, without always following a recipe. Finally, I want to improve my diet. Learning to cook was the best way I could think of to include more vegetable matter in my meals.

Nice tips, by the way. Thanks for posting!
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Posted 2/9/17
It's so difficult to know what constitutes 'easy', so I guess I will go with churros, and by extension éclairs.

Churros: yield 2 1/2 dozen

Éclair paste -- 2 lb (960 g)
Granulated sugar -- 4 oz (120 g)
Cinnamon, ground -- .2 oz (1 tbsp. / 6 g)
Chocolate Fudge Sauce -- as needed

1. Place éclair paste in a pastry bag fitted with medium star tip.
2. Head the deep fat to 375 F (191 C). Pipe 6-inch-long (15-centimeter) strips of éclair paste into the fat, cutting the éclair paste with a small knife into uniform lengths. Allow the pastries to swim freely in the fat. Deep-fry the dough until golden brown.
3. Combine the sugar and cinnamon in a large bowl. Toss the hot churros in the sugar mixture to coat. Serve the churros while still hot with a cup of warmed chocolate fudge sauce for dipping.


Éclair paste (and by extension éclair)-- yield 2-2 1/2 lb (1200-1300 g) paste
Milk* -- 8 fl oz / 240 ml (for crispier product replace with water)
Water -- 8fl oz / 240 ml
Salt -- .3 oz (1 1/2 tsp. / 9 g)
Granulated Sugar -- .3 oz (2 tsp. / 9 g)
Unsalted Butter -- 7.5 oz / 225 g
All-purpose flour -- 8 oz / 240 g
Eggs -- 8.3-11.5 oz (5-7 eggs / 250-345 g)

1. Preheat oven to 425 F / 220 C. Line a sheet pan with parchment. Have a pastry bag with large plain tip ready.

2. Place the milk, water, salt, sugar and butter in a saucepan. Bring to a boil. make sure the butter is fully melted.
3. Remove from the heat and immediately add all the flour. Vigorously beat the dough by hand. Put the pan back on the heat and continue beating the dough until it comes away from the sides of the pan. The dough should look relatively dry and should just begin to leave a film on the saucepan.
4. Transfer the dough to the bowl of a mixer fitted with a paddle and allow it to cool briefly to approximately 130 F/ 54 C or lower. Begin beating in the eggs one at a time.
5. Continue to add eggs one by one until the mixture is shiny but firm. It may not be necessary to use all of the eggs. The dough should pull away from the sides of the bowl in thick threads; it will not clear the bowl.

6. Put a workable amount of dough into the pastry bag and pipe onto the sheet pan in the desired shapes at once. (Spraying the inside of the pastry bag with vegetable cooking spray will keep the éclair paste from clinging to the inside of the bag and make cleanup easier.)
7. Bake immediately at 425 F/ 220 C for 10 minutes, then reduce to 375 F / 190 C and bake another 10 minutes. Continue gradually reducing the oven temperature every few minutes until it reaches about 200 F / 90 C or until the shames are brown and dry inside. Open the oven door as little as possible, to prevent rapid changes in the oven's temperature.
8. Cool completely, then fill as desired. Leftovers can be frozen or stored at room temperature.

Thusly are churros born into your life, according to culinary arts textbooks.
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