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Post Reply How Important Is Your Privacy ?
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22 / M / Roskilde, Denmark
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Posted 2/8/17
I don't believe privacy is about hiding stuff, because you don't really need it to hide things you do not want other people to know. for me at least, its more because your information (and by extension your personal life and identity) get exploited for economic reasons by companies like google or facebook. and its the same with windows 10: I wouldn't mind being tracked in order to use cortana per se, what upsets me the fact that the same data will be shared with 3rd party advertisers under terms i have no control over, and then mined for profit.
Cenric 
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Posted 2/8/17 , edited 2/8/17

Ranwolf wrote:
Freedom of speech does not automatically mean freedom from consequences. There are too many of a criminal and terrorist bent using these archaic ideals you're espousing to seriously entertain them. The world has changed ( and not for the best) and we have to change the way we handle interaction and personal security.

It's easy to insult my stance when you sit comfortable in your white bread world sipping a Starbucks skinny mocha but in the real world it's not so easy. Plenty of good men and women have died because people like you think privacy is worth the odd flag draped coffin. If you have a real issue with something say so, don't hide behind outdated ideals of privacy being the only thing worthwhile.


I agree, there's no such thing as freedom from consequence. No right or law or ideal can stop you from killing me if I try to shoot at you, that's just how the universe works. It's certain that some lives could be saved if we give organizations the right to quickly access information in order to find people intending to harm others. I understand being on the top of information is an essential part of dealing with such people and saving lives. However, the world is not exclusively filled with strong individuals in a position to face everyone who have a problem with them. Not all parts of the world are so forgiving with journalists, minorities and many others that they could just live their lives without having to worry about what other people or goverments would do to them if they found out who they are and what they think. To these people having privacy is the only thing that allows them to live with any sense of worth in such abusive enviroments. There's a completely objective problem here if you ask me, nothing to do with my or your stance. How to catch the individuals intending to harm people and society while protecting the rest of the population? To reach that goal, I feel some level of privacy is certainly justified.

Edit: I would like to add that privacy seems like a good solution to me exactly because there is no freedom from consequence. Even if you allow organizations to see the information about people and then set laws that stop them from abusing it, that doesn't really stop them from secretly doing it anyway. When you don't know it, you can't abuse it, the only way to really make sure. Then there's the idea of weakening information security technology to make it harder to hide information and therefore easier for police and such to get a hold of it. That idea makes no sense for one reason, weakening technology makes it easier for anyone to access that information, including criminals. If you ask me all of these things are a double-edged sword. Still, I'm open to changes that actually increase security, it's just often not the case like with mass surveillence, weakening encryption and such.
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19 / M / Palm Coast, Florida
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Posted 2/8/17
I highly value my privacy, everyone deserves their own bit of privacy. But if you mean online privacy? Ha, that's a joke. It's not very comforting seeing DHS pop on the internet connection every now and then.
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☆Land of sweets☆
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Posted 2/8/17 , edited 2/8/17
i think there should be a balance in privacy and law enforcement being able to do their work. they surely shouldn't need to take down everyone's privacy just to catch a few petty criminals.

all your privacy are belong to us.

this message has been edited by the Department of Bunnyland Security

edit: funny how my internet went down after posting this. and CR seems to be under DoS attack again.
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29 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 2/8/17


And I'd like to say Transparency is it's own safety net . If we all know, then they can be no abuse of it , and widespread monitoring of potential threats can take place without fear of undue interruption of our personal rights.

Of course as you say not all countries are as open about how they handle privacy and security. And those working within their borders to change such things are at the greatest risk if we adopted such a invasive policy across the board . At the same time however we can not pretend the old ways of doing things work any longer. The increase in terrorist attacks across multiple countries and the fact that despite nearly 30 years of direct intervention in the Middle East people are still dying at the hands of terrorist cells says a lot more then anything else.

Perhaps there is some middle ground to be entertained but one must take care of the body before worrying about the soul as it were.
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26 / M
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Posted 2/8/17 , edited 2/8/17
As long as those who monitor us could do as efficiently as possible and actually prevent terrorist attacks, I´d have no problems with my mail or other online information being monitored.

But the system they put in place is oversaturated with information. What´s the point in monitoring anyone if you monitor EVERYONE? How do you filter that information logically and efficiently? How do you differentiate between a joke sentence and an actual terrorist plot? The software they´re using to monitor with needs more filters, a better search base, not just get a hit on every single post on the internet that has the words "bomb", "terrorist" or "kill" in it, as an example.

I´ve long since come to terms with anything I post online becoming public information. I´m fully aware of that every time I write an email, this post, or anything else. It´s not really an issue for me anymore. But the system is flawed and right now it´s just "spying" on everyone with no discrimination.
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30 / M / U.S.
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Posted 2/8/17
I consider privacy to be very important. I find it disturbing when people support the idea that governments and law enforcement should have unlimited knowledge (or something close to that) in order to keep citizens safe. Obviously you shouldn't expect that something you post in a public space online like Crunchyroll to remain private, but it is increasingly difficult to have anything you do to remain private. Even many children's toys now connect to the internet and collect data, to say nothing of things like Amazon Echo, Google Home, or SmartTVs that have cameras and microphones. By default, the latest version of Windows tracks every application you use and for how long, which files you open, and tells Microsoft about everything you do online (if you use Edge). You can limit but not stop this data collection (although a recent legal decision will see more choice come in an update down the road).

The trend has been towards ever increasing data collection and relaxing of restrictions of how the government can acquire that data. What governments and law enforcement cannot yet acquire directly they can acquire by being partners of the businesses that collect the data. The greatest victory that our enemies could ever win against the free world is the free world no longer being free. It isn't about someone know what you watch on Netflix, it is about a corrupt government eventually using such absolute knowledge to find and punish legal political dissidents, religious adherents, and censor or limit speech.

We are by no means in such a dire situation at present, but it would be naive to pretend that such a trend of "security" trumping privacy cannot have severe negative consequences.
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24 / M / Abyss
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Posted 2/8/17

Mr_Robot wrote:

As long as those who monitor us could do as efficiently as possible and actually prevent terrorist attacks, I´d have no problems with my mail or other online information being monitored.

But the system they put in place is oversaturated with information. What´s the point in monitoring anyone if you monitor EVERYONE? How do you filter that information logically and efficiently? How do you differentiate between a joke sentence and an actual terrorist plot? The software they´re using to monitor with needs more filters, a better search base, not just get a hit on every single post on the internet that has the words "bomb", "terrorist" or "kill" in it, as an example.

I´ve long since come to terms with anything I post online becoming public information. I´m fully aware of that every time I write an email, this post, or anything else. It´s not really an issue for me anymore. But the system is flawed and right now it´s just "spying" on everyone with no discrimination.


Keywords. Only look at those who constantly use keywords.

Would you look at a person who watches youtube, or would you rather look at the guy who often uses "bombs" "how to make" "murder" etc. You have no need to look at all the data, just use that which triggers keywords.
621 cr points
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26 / M / USA
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Posted 2/8/17
I do care somewhat. It really depends on how my information is used.

I think it's only possible to achieve some level of privacy from some random person on the internet, and I already know I'm easy to find down to the city where I live. My location being somewhat known or easy to figure out doesn't bother me, though. A larger corporation or the government would have no problem building a profile on me, even if I did put in the effort to be more anonymous. Honestly, a lot of the nice products convenient to us are made possible because of the ability large companies have to collect large amounts of data to train pattern recognition algorithms and apply them to technology we use everyday.
2443 cr points
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Posted 2/8/17
19802 cr points
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29 / M / B.C, Canada
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Posted 2/8/17 , edited 4/20/17

EarthLight22 wrote:

I consider privacy to be very important. I find it disturbing when people support the idea that governments and law enforcement should have unlimited knowledge (or something close to that) in order to keep citizens safe. Obviously you shouldn't expect that something you post in a public space online like Crunchyroll to remain private, but it is increasingly difficult to have anything you do to remain private. Even many children's toys now connect to the internet and collect data, to say nothing of things like Amazon Echo, Google Home, or SmartTVs that have cameras and microphones. By default, the latest version of Windows tracks every application you use and for how long, which files you open, and tells Microsoft about everything you do online (if you use Edge). You can limit but not stop this data collection (although a recent legal decision will see more choice come in an update down the road).

The trend has been towards ever increasing data collection and relaxing of restrictions of how the government can acquire that data. What governments and law enforcement cannot yet acquire directly they can acquire by being partners of the businesses that collect the data. The greatest victory that our enemies could ever win against the free world is the free world no longer being free. It isn't about someone know what you watch on Netflix, it is about a corrupt government eventually using such absolute knowledge to find and punish legal political dissidents, religious adherents, and censor or limit speech.

We are by no means in such a dire situation at present, but it would be naive to pretend that such a trend of "security" trumping privacy cannot have severe negative consequences.


Perhaps we do so simply because your fancy rhetoric proves nothing and the ideals you are espousing mean far less to us then the lives lost trying to maintain a status quo that longer works. If you have a better idea that can work just as effectively by all means share it with those in charge. But don't expect people like me to buy into the meaningless rhetoric you are speaking right now.
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37 / M / Small Wooded town...
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Posted 2/9/17
'I can protect my self... so just stay out of my life and let me be, and we will be good friends.'
3834 cr points
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Posted 2/17/17

namealreadytaken wrote:

i think there should be a balance in privacy and law enforcement being able to do their work. they surely shouldn't need to take down everyone's privacy just to catch a few petty criminals.

all your privacy are belong to us.

this message has been edited by the Department of Bunnyland Security

edit: funny how my internet went down after posting this. and CR seems to be under DoS attack again.



big brother is watching you...
2443 cr points
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Posted 2/23/17
i got another email

1333 cr points
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26 / M / Colorado
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Posted 2/24/17
I don't value privacy that highly. I mean; I don't want it to be a live stream whenever I shower or piss, but I live my life in a way that's open. I don't keep much of any secrets unless they're given to me in the trust of another, and there's nothing about who I am or what I do that I earnestly care if anyone else knows.

The whole notion of big brother doesn't really phase me.
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