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Post Reply The Significance of Highschool
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Posted 2/23/17
It was such a waste of my time. I don't even know how to adult, but here, I know a shit ton of useless information I won't use unless I'm a scientist or a mathematician maybe. But I don't want to be any of those things. The only thing I got out of my financial lit class was to write a check, and NOBODY uses checks any more. I guess I know how to bake, but that was an ELECTIVE class. Like what the fuck.
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Posted 2/23/17 , edited 2/23/17

auroraloose wrote:


Ununoctium wrote:

You don't really need to be so abrasive; but, thanks for your input.


I'm not going to be abrasive, but I will be harsh:

Your response to Ejanss indicates you have an entitled attitude. You have explained to us how you didn't do very well in high school and feel that you wasted your time - in a way that, to many adults, looks like whining - and you then asked for "insight from older members of the community." When someone said something "abrasive" to you, you thought it appropriate to correct the person's "abrasiveness." But you've come to us in a position of supplication: that isn't a position where you have the authority to correct people - not to mention that you're a high school student. Sure, this is an anime forum, so you can act however you want - but that means people can show up and be a lot more abrasive than Ejanss, and you have to live with it.

The possibility I want you to consider is this: maybe your perspective on life is so myopic that you really need someone to say something incredibly abrasive so you learn your lesson. Now maybe it's not - maybe you do have a healthy life perspective. Your initial post makes me think otherwise. But even if I'm wrong, you should approach important things in life keeping in mind the possibility that you might be a complete idiot. Understanding and admitting that you don't know something isn't bad; not being aware that you don't know something is what's dangerous. So have a teachable attitude.

As to your situation, I don't think I have enough information to give you advice yet: You said that you've been " required to take pointless classes that I have no vested interest in"; could you give an example of a class you took that you considered pointless? Second, you said that you "love science and math"; how do you express this love? Did you put in a lot of effort in your chemistry class, maybe? Or do you just like talking about science and having sciency usernames? When I was in high school (well, actually I was homeschooled), I would sit and think about random math things I could calculate, like if you took out the earth's core and made a shell around the earth with it 50 miles above the surface, how thick would the shell be? (I have no idea why that was interesting to me.) Finally, do you really think "it's all about GPA"? Presumably you're worried here about getting a job, and maybe "following your passion" (which is a bad way to direct your life, by the way); why do you think that your GPA has stopped you in this regard?


I've taken every advanced science course my school offers, and I've earned an A in all of them. I've taken Advanced Biology I & II, Advanced Chemistry l, and I'm currently taking Advanced Chemistry II and Advanced Physics l. As for math, I'm in a rudimentary introduction to calculus course. That's my school's highest level math class. When I say pointless classes, I mean classes that are mandated by the state that you can't avoid taking. I just wish to take courses that will be of the most benefit to me. I don't think that's asking too much, right? You know what? You're right in saying that my life perspective is myopic. Congratulations. I come from a small remote town in Minnesota. It's about as rural and traditional as you can get. Then again, maybe not. I don't feel that my perspective on life is warped; but, perhaps I'm just not cognizant that it is, or may be. I was always told to follow my passion since I was a child. Is that really wrong? Anyways, as for my GPA, I feel that because of that number, as it were, it has severely limited my options for "higher education," and I'm upset about it. The top 10% in my class are the social butterflies that always have their parent's support in everything they do. I never really had that, and I feel that's the primary reason why I feel the way I do now. I don't think I've ever really had anyone direct me in my studies, or urge me forward. I was on my own in that sense. I'll conclude my reply by saying that: Yes, I know I'm ignorant and I always will be. Yes, I feel entitled but nowadays who doesn't? I can tell you that most of my peers do! I'm sure my reply won't be enough to satisfy you. So, feel free to continue inquiring as you wish.
Ejanss 
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Posted 2/23/17

Ununoctium wrote: I come from a small remote town in Minnesota. It's about as rural and traditional as you can get. Then again, maybe not. I don't feel that my perspective on life is warped; but, perhaps I'm just not cognizant that it is, or may be. I was always told to follow my passion since I was a child. Is that really wrong? Anyways, as for my GPA, I feel that because of that number, as it were, it has severely limited my options for "higher education," and I'm upset about it. The top 10% in my class are the social butterflies that always have their parent's support in everything they do. I never really had that, and I feel that's the primary reason why I feel the way I do now. I don't think I've ever really had anyone direct me in my studies, or urge me forward. I was on my own in that sense. I'll conclude my reply by saying that: Yes, I know I'm ignorant and I always will be. Yes, I feel entitled but nowadays who doesn't?


The people who don't feel entitled, mostly.

And who also don't shift blame around for their own poor-me circumstances, something even Millennials may eventually find themselves growing out of.
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Posted 2/23/17

Ununoctium wrote:

I've taken every advanced science course my school offers, and I've earned an A in all of them. I've taken Advanced Biology I & II, Advanced Chemistry l, and I'm currently taking Advanced Chemistry II and Advanced Physics l. As for math, I'm in a rudimentary introduction to calculus course. That's my school's highest level math class. When I say pointless classes, I mean classes that are mandated by the state that you can't avoid taking. I just wish to take courses that will be of the most benefit to me. I don't think that's asking too much, right? You know what? You're right in saying that my life perspective is myopic. Congratulations. I come from a small remote town in Minnesota. It's about as rural and traditional as you can get. Then again, maybe not. I don't feel that my perspective on life is warped; but, perhaps I'm just not cognizant that it is, or may be. I was always told to follow my passion since I was a child. Is that really wrong? Anyways, as for my GPA, I feel that because of that number, as it were, it has severely limited my options for "higher education," and I'm upset about it. The top 10% in my class are the social butterflies that always have their parent's support in everything they do. I never really had that, and I feel that's the primary reason why I feel the way I do now. I don't think I've ever really had anyone direct me in my studies, or urge me forward. I was on my own in that sense. I'll conclude my reply by saying that: Yes, I know I'm ignorant and I always will be. Yes, I feel entitled but nowadays who doesn't? I can tell you that most of my peers do! I'm sure my reply won't be enough to satisfy you. So, feel free to continue inquiring as you wish.


Actually, that's a bit better. The way you talked about your GPA in your previous posts made me think you didn't do all that well in your science and math classes, but that isn't actually the case.

Having been homeschooled I can't really relate, but I can only think that not having supportive parents makes things a lot more difficult. When I was in college I didn't get any direction or advice on how to prepare for grad school, and that caused me a lot of pain in my first few years as a grad student. So I definitely agree that having people around to guide you is important.

Also, since I was homeschooled, I don't really know what the state-mandated classes are. Do you mean classes like history and literature?

I'm going to guess that you just heard that you didn't get in to any of the four-year colleges you applied for. I'm not a high school counselor, so I can't really tell you what to do, but is that what you want - to go to college and get a degree in the sciences? Because if necessary you can always take classes at a community college and apply to a four-year college again later. I don't know who you've talked to in your school, but I imagine it's the high school counselor's job to help you with your future plans. Take full advantage of that resource, as well as any other resources you have access to. If you got all As in your science and math courses, that does mean you ought to be prepared for the college-level versions of those courses, and colleges should recognize that.

I'll think about this a bit more, but I do want to say one more thing right now: it's good to understand that you are ignorant; we all are. But it is possible to become less ignorant in things. Having someone to guide and mentor you - someone to look up to - is really necessary. It's a depressing realization, but we are beings that need to be prodded and coerced to do things. Finally, I don't relish in pointing out that people have myopic life perspectives; that is an unfortunate situation, and one I was in for quite a long time: for about 10 years of my life, I wanted to kill myself. It turned out that all I needed was for someone to explain to me very clearly exactly why I was being fucking stupid, and I finally understood. I'm not sure I would have figured it out if I hadn't been told - and the problem was that I thought I had all the information when I didn't. I didn't even think it was possible for more information about my situation to exist, but it was. So if you can stop and ask yourself, "Am I just being stupid here?" that can go a long way.
Humms 
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Posted 2/23/17
Directions never followed, but disciplined enough to sit there being attentive, just waiting to listen to someone.

There is no significance unless you choose otherwise. It's your life after all what you make of it is where things start to take hold. There is no better lesson than life itself; the experiences and ideals we can be proud to carry. Just be ready to hit the ground enough times for it to really matter. Those who don't learn from their falls will never begin to mitigate unwanted damage in the future.

Something like that, but I'm just a nobody after all which makes it really easy to accomplish goals I set for myself.

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Posted 2/23/17 , edited 2/23/17

auroraloose wrote:


Ununoctium wrote:

I've taken every advanced science course my school offers, and I've earned an A in all of them. I've taken Advanced Biology I & II, Advanced Chemistry l, and I'm currently taking Advanced Chemistry II and Advanced Physics l. As for math, I'm in a rudimentary introduction to calculus course. That's my school's highest level math class. When I say pointless classes, I mean classes that are mandated by the state that you can't avoid taking. I just wish to take courses that will be of the most benefit to me. I don't think that's asking too much, right? You know what? You're right in saying that my life perspective is myopic. Congratulations. I come from a small remote town in Minnesota. It's about as rural and traditional as you can get. Then again, maybe not. I don't feel that my perspective on life is warped; but, perhaps I'm just not cognizant that it is, or may be. I was always told to follow my passion since I was a child. Is that really wrong? Anyways, as for my GPA, I feel that because of that number, as it were, it has severely limited my options for "higher education," and I'm upset about it. The top 10% in my class are the social butterflies that always have their parent's support in everything they do. I never really had that, and I feel that's the primary reason why I feel the way I do now. I don't think I've ever really had anyone direct me in my studies, or urge me forward. I was on my own in that sense. I'll conclude my reply by saying that: Yes, I know I'm ignorant and I always will be. Yes, I feel entitled but nowadays who doesn't? I can tell you that most of my peers do! I'm sure my reply won't be enough to satisfy you. So, feel free to continue inquiring as you wish.


Actually, that's a bit better. The way you talked about your GPA in your previous posts made me think you didn't do all that well in your science and math classes, but that isn't actually the case.

Having been homeschooled I can't really relate, but I can only think that not having supportive parents makes things a lot more difficult. When I was in college I didn't get any direction or advice on how to prepare for grad school, and that caused me a lot of pain in my first few years as a grad student. So I definitely agree that having people around to guide you is important.

Also, since I was homeschooled, I don't really know what the state-mandated classes are. Do you mean classes like history and literature?

I'm going to guess that you just heard that you didn't get in to any of the four-year colleges you applied for. I'm not a high school counselor, so I can't really tell you what to do, but is that what you want - to go to college and get a degree in the sciences? Because if necessary you can always take classes at a community college and apply to a four-year college again later. I don't know who you've talked to in your school, but I imagine it's the high school counselor's job to help you with your future plans. Take full advantage of that resource, as well as any other resources you have access to. If you got all As in your science and math courses, that does mean you ought to be prepared for the college-level versions of those courses, and colleges should recognize that.

I'll think about this a bit more, but I do want to say one more thing right now: it's good to understand that you are ignorant; we all are. But it is possible to become less ignorant in things. Having someone to guide and mentor you - someone to look up to - is really necessary. It's a depressing realization, but we are beings that need to be prodded and coerced to do things. Finally, I don't relish in pointing out that people have myopic life perspectives; that is an unfortunate situation, and one I was in for quite a long time: for about 10 years of my life, I wanted to kill myself. It turned out that all I needed was for someone to explain to me very clearly exactly why I was being fucking stupid, and I finally understood. I'm not sure I would have figured it out if I hadn't been told - and the problem was that I thought I had all the information when I didn't. I didn't even think it was possible for more information about my situation to exist, but it was. So if you can stop and ask yourself, "Am I just being stupid here?" that can go a long way.


I actually enjoy literature, and I'm currently taking an AP English course. We're reading Hamlet, and I love it. I shouldn't have been so ambiguous, and I apologize for that. The classes that I was referring to are the required art, technology education, and history classes. I resented the fact that I was obligated to take classes that were so useless to me. I'm planning on attending a local community college, but life never really goes the way I want it to. So, I wouldn't be surprised if I fuck up something else along the way. I have a genuine passion for science, and I really like biology most of all. I found Darwin's theory of evolution, by natural selection, to be so stimulating and downright interesting. Chemistry is fun too, and I've always liked studying the elements, the atoms that exist in those elements, and the subatomic particles that form atoms. Anyway, I can relate to your depression. I've been diagnosed with MDD and I've dealt with depression for quite some time. I took medication to alleviate things, but I still was nevertheless depressed. I realized that being medicated wasn't helping, and that I needed to persevere through it. I did, I think. I stopped feeling outright depressed, but I couldn't shake my own self-doubt. All of that has led me to my current life situation. I think I've just been "fucking stupid," to quote you. It's too late for silly regrets of my past, as I can't change it. I realize that I must deal with the situation and, depending on how I deal with it, I could lead a respectable and stable life. I'm just unsure of how to proceed. I've thought about it a lot, but I've neglected to take action and that haunts me.
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Posted 2/25/17
I thought Minnesota's course requirements are pretty strict compared to some other states. At least when I was in high school, I only had 1 elective class each semester except my senior year with 2 elective classes each semester. Every other class was required, per subject requirements. Then again, having all those done and passing your AP/IB exams can really help you skip the basic course requirements in college. It can save you money in college too since you could in theory graduate earlier. But I do hear what you're saying. I knew I wanted to do something in the sciences so I always thought the requirements to have to take History/Social Studies courses for 4 years were useless to me, but that's just how Minnesota rolls. Kinda curious what the requirements are now but still sounds like it's similar.

I do remember hating how it's all numbers in highschool, with GPA and ACT scores. But it acts as a filter for colleges with more applicants than they can accept, so that's why it's used. But once in college, all the highschool scores don't really matter anymore because it resets to a blank slate, so it does feel like a waste since at that point since future employers will only look at your college GPA anyway.

For me, I did great in highschool, but not so great in college. But my college GPA does not reflect my actual skills on the job. Since I'm a chemist, theories and "perfect world" situations learned in college does not always apply in reality. So does my GPA truly show my worth and skills? Probably not. My lab grades were excellent but my actual course grades were meh. But if I were to be placed on a scale at work for productivity and profit, I would always be somewhere around the top, which definitely does not match up with my college GPA.
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Posted 2/25/17

Ununoctium wrote:

I realize that I must deal with the situation and, depending on how I deal with it, I could lead a respectable and stable life. I'm just unsure of how to proceed. I've thought about it a lot, but I've neglected to take action and that haunts me.


So I wrote a whole motivational speech, anecdotes and all, and then read this segment and realised it was irrelevant for the most part. ._.

Anyway, the easiest route here is to talk to people who actually know the system, rather than Crunchyrollers. High school counsellor is probably the best bet, as already mentioned, but you could also try emailing the colleges you applied to directly and ask what they'd be looking for from you. They might not be able to tell you much, if anything, but they could point you in the right direction. That happened with me; got pointed to a really useful maths course that got me into college almost by itself. The college I ASKED still rejected me, though, so nothing's guaranteed. In my opinion, the plan of community college is a good one; it's certainly better than sitting on your arse for a year.

Alternatively, ask yourself exactly what you want to do with your life. Can you get a job you'd be really happy with now? It sounds as if you know what you want (in your heart, at least), but it's always worth giving it a good thought.

Also, don't say things like "I'll probably fuck something else up along the way". It's easier said than done, but that will become a self-fulfilling prophecy. No matter how things went at grade school, you can still come out of that with a good degree. I failed my finals due to ME (fortunately, a mild variant), which crippled me for years on end. Once I'd recovered, I managed to motivate myself to get back on my feet as soon as I could, and I got into a decent college. I'm now in my second year and doing perfectly fine. Admittedly, the UK schooling system is somewhat different, but I'd like to think that I could've succeeded in the US just as well. If an idiot like me can do it, anyone can. Hard work does really pay off, and you seem like you're keen to succeed. That keenness will get you far, just so long as you act on it.

I want to emphasise this last part: As long as you work hard to achieve your goals in life, none of your time is wasted. Even high school. You acquired tools there that will help you in later life (even if most of school is useless garbage). The only time you waste is the time you sit on your thumbs and do nothing because "baww, my life is hard". Yes, life can be hard. Very little of it is insurmountable, however. Poor grades are things you can overcome with hard work and dedication. Depression can be overcome with positive thinking and some compassionate friends at your side (or professional help, if we're talking clinical depression). Especially that last part. Friends can help a tonne for motivation and positivity. Talk to them. I am beginning to ramble. I shall stop.
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Posted 2/25/17

Ununoctium wrote:

I can't help but feel appalled that GPA and standarized test scores determine a person's self-worth.


No, a test doesn't make you feel a certain way. YOU make yourself feel a certain way.

If you let something determine your worth, then the responsibility lays upon you.
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Posted 2/25/17
30 is actually pretty good on the ACT. I think 27 is where you start to get scholarships. I hated high school too. They could have fit anything meaningful you learned into 3 years at least, probably less than that.
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Posted 2/25/17 , edited 2/25/17
As someone who has walked along a similar path before you, If its not too forward of me I would like to share with you some of the books that really helped me. Ishmael by Daniel Quin. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. Siddhartha and Steppenwolfe by Herman Hesse. An Enemy of the People by Henrik Ibsen. The Neverending Story by Michael Ende. Ethics for the new Millennium by Tenzin Gyato. Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro. The Sound of the Mountain by Yasunari Kawabata. Last one that I can recall of the top of my head is Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer.

You'll get there.


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23 / M / Texas
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Posted 2/25/17
High school was pretty much a giant waste of time for me. I learned more in my first semester of college than all four years of high school combined.
Posted 2/25/17 , edited 2/25/17
I got kicked out of daycare.
I do alright, actually I'm in a much better position than a lot of the ones that stayed till year 12. I think it's because they bank on memorizing rather than learning which would make sense as the schools I went to encouraged this mentality.
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20 / M / Palm Coast, Florida
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Posted 2/25/17
All the useless classes should be replaced with life skill classes. Like paying bills, taxes, and math I'll actually use.
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29 / F / The margins
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Posted 2/26/17

Ununoctium wrote:

I actually enjoy literature, and I'm currently taking an AP English course. We're reading Hamlet, and I love it. I shouldn't have been so ambiguous, and I apologize for that. The classes that I was referring to are the required art, technology education, and history classes. I resented the fact that I was obligated to take classes that were so useless to me. I'm planning on attending a local community college, but life never really goes the way I want it to. So, I wouldn't be surprised if I fuck up something else along the way. I have a genuine passion for science, and I really like biology most of all. I found Darwin's theory of evolution, by natural selection, to be so stimulating and downright interesting. Chemistry is fun too, and I've always liked studying the elements, the atoms that exist in those elements, and the subatomic particles that form atoms. Anyway, I can relate to your depression. I've been diagnosed with MDD and I've dealt with depression for quite some time. I took medication to alleviate things, but I still was nevertheless depressed. I realized that being medicated wasn't helping, and that I needed to persevere through it. I did, I think. I stopped feeling outright depressed, but I couldn't shake my own self-doubt. All of that has led me to my current life situation. I think I've just been "fucking stupid," to quote you. It's too late for silly regrets of my past, as I can't change it. I realize that I must deal with the situation and, depending on how I deal with it, I could lead a respectable and stable life. I'm just unsure of how to proceed. I've thought about it a lot, but I've neglected to take action and that haunts me.


Then here is my advice: get some accountability. Humans need prodding from the outside; if we just sit on our own trying to solve our problems, we'll just keep sitting and thinking, too lazy and too afraid to do anything about it. But if you have someone yelling at you to do something, or someone you want to do something for, you're much more likely to act.

I'm going to tell a story now, because accountability to others doesn't have to manifest itself straightforwardly: As I said, I was homeschooled, so I was very directly accountable to my parents until college. But there was another way I held myself accountable to people: I wanted to be smarter than my peers. This started very early in my life, because started elementary school way more prepared than my fellow students, and it didn't take me long to realize that I got praise and special attention for that. That continued into college: I came in my freshman year already knowing all the math I needed for a physics major, so it was easy to lord it over people. I also finally met some people as skilled as I was, so we could tower over our pathetic peers and engage our curiosity together at the same time (we actually were passionate about our fields, too). But then something funny happened: once I started taking more specialized courses and graduate courses, I couldn't do that anymore. Because people were no longer around each other as much: it doesn't matter whether you did better on the exam than your peers when you're trying to do research. And only you can do your own research - there's no easy direct comparison, and there's no easy collaboration. And so I became less interested - and as things got way harder in graduate school, I started not to do so well. Another thing I lost was a community of like-minded peers: I had learned not to tower over people after a couple years of grad school, but as a theorist it's hard to get people to share your peculiar brand of curiosity. Growing out of a bad connection to people (being motivated to lord over others) and losing a good connection really hurt my motivation. Things are better now because I'm more connected to my thesis advisor, who provides me with accountability, but it's still hard not having like-minded peers (and I just moved halfway across the world).

Now, that's not the happiest story: I got at least part of the way to where I am now by feeding off my own feelings of superiority. But what that tells you is how powerful our connections to other people are, and that you should pay attention to what exactly you get out of them. What is it really that motivates you, and how does that relate to the other people in your life? (You may find something unsavory here; don't suppress it.) Do you have friends or peers on a similar path, and can you band together? Can you try to get your parents more involved? Do you know of other people who could mentor you, or at least provide some advice - especially someone farther along in your desired career path? Are you in a relationship? So many people are around you, and they are all potential sources of motivation - even your enemies, and you should respect them for that. How do you perceive yourself in relation to the top 10% of your class, whom you mentioned earlier? (While you're at it, think about how reading and participating in social media affects you. These days politics on the Internet is making people very unhappy, and it really affects their lives.) Think about this, and then go bother people. If you're annoying enough they'll have to reciprocate. Make yourself accountable to someone if you can. The thing about people is that our collective knowledge is far superior to the knowledge of a single individual. So if you can't think of an answer to something, don't get stuck thinking there's no answer. Assume you don't know enough and ask someone else. In my case this is the exact thing that got me over my depression, and while I don't claim expert knowledge here, I really think it can do the same for other people.
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