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Post Reply Crunchyroll invested in more than two dozen anime productions
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Posted 2/28/17
https://blog.ellation.com/2017-is-the-year-that-anime-becomes-mainstream-805764022e81#.563i2xo6z
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26 / M / This Dying World
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Posted 2/28/17 , edited 2/28/17
How about invest in more servers?
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Posted 2/28/17 , edited 2/28/17

AnimeKami wrote:

How about invest in more servers?


This I can agree with
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Posted 2/28/17 , edited 2/28/17

AnimeKami wrote:

How about invest in more servers?


I wish there were a little fire emoji, because that was a total burn. Speaking of which, kind of funny that a forum around Japanese animation doesn't have emoji built in.
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Posted 2/28/17 , edited 2/28/17

karatecowboy wrote:

I wish there were a little fire emoji, because that was a total burn. Speaking of which, kind of funny that a forum around Japanese animation doesn't have emoji built in.



Just img link one instead.





Through our partnership with Sumitomo, we’ve already invested in more than two dozen anime productions and our efforts are starting to bear fruit. For example, one of our co-produced titles — Masamune Kun’s Revenge — has been a top title for Crunchyroll this season on service, as well as a hit globally.

We are continuing to push the envelope on what we believe to be true creative collaboration between East and West. Our originals collaborations, including Children of Ether with LeSean Thomas, and SHELTER with Porter Robinson, has both received acclaim and strong support from our audience. The anime medium is experiencing an international renaissance as foreign creators who grew up on anime look east to collaborations with Japan. Our role is continue to build that bridge through our audience, data and our unique position in the anime market.



I knew it.... Now I know why me watching Aki so much...

In either case, this news isn't actually new.


http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2015-10-22/crunchyroll-sumitomo-announce-partnership-to-create-company-to-co-produce-anime/.94495

Media distribution service Crunchyroll and Japanese trading company Sumitomo Corporation announced on Thursday that they have launched a joint venture to create a company focused on funding anime co-production projects. By being part of an anime's production committee, the company can immediately acquire foreign distribution rights and promote anime outside of Japan.



But at least have an idea thereof.

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Posted 2/28/17
This thread will cause an ERROR_500
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Posted 2/28/17 , edited 2/28/17
It is just marketing from the parent company, geared to investors.

But I do think it's true, and I do think anime will take off in 2017.

As for fans who want to keep it niche and not let it become mainstream... why? That's stupid. If it's a good thing, why wouldn't you want more people to appreciate it? Why wouldn't you want as many people as possible to see and learn from the thing that you love?

Also, as one of those "creators raised on anime who looks back to Japan"... I like the idea of collaborations/co-pros.
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Posted 2/28/17 , edited 2/28/17
I don't dislike anime becoming more mainstream in the west. But I do dislike Peter Chernin's creation of a western anime monopoly.

If I want to watch legal subbed anime, Crunchyroll (soon to be VRV) is fast becoming the only show in town. And that's never a good thing for consumers. Particularly when Crunchyroll doesn't care enough to spend any significant money on improving their server infrastructure.

I think we already saw, and have been a part of the golden age. And that was when Crunchyroll and Funimation (as well as Daisuke and Sentai and others to a lesser extent) were all in direct competition every season. That is what keeps an industry healthy and thriving. What we have coming at us now is what causes stagnation.

2016 from my perspective:

Hulu pared down their series from being the biggest show in town (in the US) to barely a blip on the radar. So no longer are they my go to place when other services crap out on the weekends.

Crunchyroll has remained completely unchanged (for the worse). While all of their major technicians got pulled to the VRV project (then subsequently got fired).

FunimationNOW is introduced which makes their website even worse than it was previously. Completely broke their Roku app in how slow it is now (among other apps I'm sure). And are in the process of taking away all subtitled content (and bringing them to Crunchyroll to host on their garbage servers).

And now finally VRV is here to unite all the lands under one banner. What great days we have ahead of us
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Posted 2/28/17

LavenderMintRose wrote:

It is just marketing from the parent company, geared to investors.

But I do think it's true, and I do think anime will take off in 2017.

As for fans who want to keep it niche and not let it become mainstream... why? That's stupid. If it's a good thing, why wouldn't you want more people to appreciate it? Why wouldn't you want as many people as possible to see and learn from the thing that you love?

Also, as one of those "creators raised on anime who looks back to Japan"... I like the idea of collaborations/co-pros.

If you're interested, I made a post some time ago that touched on this (albeit in my typical garrulous fashion) here.

The short version is that there are both good and some bad things about the anime community growing. I've never argued against that growth, but I certainly do miss some things about when it was a more niche interest.
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Posted 2/28/17

Balzack wrote:

I don't dislike anime becoming more mainstream in the west. But I do dislike Peter Chernin's creation of a western anime monopoly.


BLASPHEMY!!!!
HOW DARE YOU QUESTION FEARLESS OVERLORD?!!?!?


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Posted 2/28/17

Balzack wrote:

If I want to watch legal subbed anime, Crunchyroll (soon to be VRV) is fast becoming the only show in town. And that's never a good thing for consumers. Particularly when Crunchyroll doesn't care enough to spend any significant money on improving their server infrastructure.


Unless something major happens I don't see Netflix or Amazon stepping out of anime anytime soon or Crunchyroll being able to buy either out. Sure they only have like 4 shows not on Crunchyroll from this season combined but Scum's Wish and Little Witch Academia are two of the more popular shows this season and are unable to watched on Crunchyroll requiring you to go to Amazon or wait for Netflix.
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Posted 2/28/17 , edited 2/28/17
So? ADV and i'm sure Funimation has done the same to.


..and anime is already mainstream my nephew knows was Hetaila is!
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Posted 2/28/17 , edited 2/28/17

Balzack wrote:

I don't dislike anime becoming more mainstream in the west. But I do dislike Peter Chernin's creation of a western anime monopoly.

If I want to watch legal subbed anime, Crunchyroll (soon to be VRV) is fast becoming the only show in town. And that's never a good thing for consumers. Particularly when Crunchyroll doesn't care enough to spend any significant money on improving their server infrastructure.

I think we already saw, and have been a part of the golden age. And that was when Crunchyroll and Funimation (as well as Daisuke and Sentai and others to a lesser extent) were all in direct competition every season. That is what keeps an industry healthy and thriving. What we have coming at us now is what causes stagnation.

2016 from my perspective:

Hulu pared down their series from being the biggest show in town (in the US) to barely a blip on the radar. So no longer are they my go to place when other services crap out on the weekends.

Crunchyroll has remained completely unchanged (for the worse). While all of their major technicians got pulled to the VRV project (then subsequently got fired).

FunimationNOW is introduced which makes their website even worse than it was previously. Completely broke their Roku app in how slow it is now (among other apps I'm sure). And are in the process of taking away all subtitled content (and bringing them to Crunchyroll to host on their garbage servers).

And now finally VRV is here to unite all the lands under one banner. What great days we have ahead of us


And yet before CR became so big a behemoth in the anime market the industry was stifled ironically by false consumerism because for all Hulu and Funimation etc were bigger players they restricted legal ways to see the anime outside of NA and Asia. How can a market grow when it's so innaccessible and a trademark niche because of this so it's a good thing we're seeing change. There is still room for a non monopoly but the consumers you mention don't want that... You must have seen the reactions to Amazon doing an anime focused service?

Biggest issue with anime industry growth in general is still its niche, it's all grown by word of mouth really. Media doesn't give a stuff about it so it's getting little coverage - Your Name breaking every record in the book? You wouldn't know unless youre already invested in keeping up on anime news in the West. Anime news outlets still nerdy as hell, the YouTube anime "celebs" embody every stereotype you have about "geeks" "weeabu" or "otaku" which is off putting vs making it normal. I dunno I think we're in a good place now as accessibility is the CR mantra... Something we must encourage over splintered license agreements for sake of avoiding perceived monopolies as whether we blame CR or who ever else I still feel the anime bubble will burst again as it's too expensive physically with most bigger outlets (£35 for Triage X?...Ok MANGA) and there's too much of it to prosper in the streaming sector (60+ anime a season? That's a lot of unwatched anime). Then there's piracy the worst and still biggest monopoly player of all...
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Posted 2/28/17

curr0001 wrote:

So? ADV and i'm sure Funimation has done the same to.


..and anime is already mainstream my nephew knows was Hetaila is!


Do you know what they mean by produce? They mean Crunchyroll is on a lot of production committees meaning Crunchyroll are funding the animes & Funimation doesn't produce anime at all ever since Dimension W didn't do well in Japan
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Posted 2/28/17
This will be an interesting year for anime. That is for sure.
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