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Post Reply Should Dub and Sub mix?
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22 / M / Shinjuku, Tokyo
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Posted 3/5/17
As many of you may know on 3/18 Kuroko no Basket: Last Game movie will be out. Here is the new trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpJ3LY1ZIoE

If you've read the manga then you know an American team comes over to Japan to play a game against the generation of miracles. I've just been wondering why do the Americans speak Japanese all the time, you think they would speak English especially to each other. The Japanese could simply add subtitles for the English parts.

I am wondering do any of you know of any past or present anime that have had both English and Japanese voice actors in the same anime? If not would you like to see it in future anime or do you think it is even possible at all? I'd love to hear your guys' opinions.

Thank you all! I can't wait to watch it in Shinjuku theatres, it will be great. Kise zone!!!
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Posted 3/5/17

RoachSandeson wrote:

I've just been wondering why do the Americans speak Japanese all the time, you think they would speak English especially to each other. The Japanese could simply add subtitles for the English parts.

They do so for the same reason that most Hollywood movies are dubbed for the Japanese market; The majority of the audience doesn't want to read subtitles.

If you've seen enough anime to see examples where they actually had people from the U.S. speaking English for any length of time, you'd also note that it is usually done by non-native speakers. Even when done relatively well (i.e., the Guadalcana arc of Zipang) it isn't great, and more often any prolonged dialog promotes a "What the heck is that?" reaction from native English speakers (i.e. the first episode of Kashimashi: Girl Meets Girl).

Even in cases where they have someone that speaks English, those in charge of the production also seem to have sometimes not been interested in any input on proper phrasing, etc.. This makes sense when you consider that their primary market is in Japan, so it only has to pass that standard.

About the only way you'd see a production with both proper English and Japanese would be if it were a co-production, and the English speaking parts were handled by a U.S. studio using voice actors here. Anime movies may typically have a larger budget per screen minute than a series, but it still isn't enough to justify that.

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Posted 3/5/17
I've found a number of times when an anime enlists a native English speaker for a part in English the results are... disappointing. Frequently it's like they pulled the only native speaker they knew to come do the reading. The acting is very stilted and sounds like they're reading from a script for the first time rather than performing a practiced part. A prime if older example is from the Robot Carnival compilation where an American scientist attacks Japan in the late 1800s using a giant robot. The acting is so bad it's painful to listen to. (This compared to the dub where the same character's English VA is hilariously amazing.)

I don't think it's that studios are unwilling to do parts in English. It's just that finding qualified VAs in Japan to do the parts is very challenging. The talent pool simply is either not there or very, very small.
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from the South Bay
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Posted 3/5/17 , edited 3/5/17
mmm

Or the Japanese production could just hire the american or canadian VA directly and then do the joint adr work online . All the america VA has a mean to record their lines professionally and then just submit the mp3 file to Japan. Well that is just an idea.

But every time they hire an english speaking person , the voice acting is really awfull. Its as if we cant tell the difference between someone who does it for a living and just those who just becuase they can speak english with an american accent not unless its seiyuu Murase

I remember JYB was hired by the japanese Game company CAPCOM to do the english lines for his game character in Devil May Cry .





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22 / M / Shinjuku, Tokyo
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Posted 3/5/17 , edited 3/5/17
I like all the points you guys are discussing. I would like to know why a Japanese anime company couldn't just hire one of the known English voice actors that work for Funimation or whatever. Aside from money issues, perhaps they could have official dubbing. It is as we all know and as is Akashi's voice actor in the trailer listed, the English is pretty bad sometimes to the point of unrecognizable.

It stinks that you would think these companies have the capabilities to hire professional English speakers whether Japanese or American or any other nation.
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Posted 3/5/17

TheAncientOne wrote:


RoachSandeson wrote:

I've just been wondering why do the Americans speak Japanese all the time, you think they would speak English especially to each other. The Japanese could simply add subtitles for the English parts.

They do so for the same reason that most Hollywood movies are dubbed for the Japanese market; The majority of the audience doesn't want to read subtitles.

If you've seen enough anime to see examples where they actually had people from the U.S. speaking English for any length of time, you'd also note that it is usually done by non-native speakers. Even when done relatively well (i.e., the Guadalcana arc of Zipang) it isn't great, and more often any prolonged dialog promotes a "What the heck is that?" reaction from native English speakers (i.e. the first episode of Kashimashi: Girl Meets Girl).

Even in cases where they have someone that speaks English, those in charge of the production also seem to have sometimes not been interested in any input on proper phrasing, etc.. This makes sense when you consider that their primary market is in Japan, so it only has to pass that standard.

About the only way you'd see a production with both proper English and Japanese would be if it were a co-production, and the English speaking parts were handled by a U.S. studio using voice actors here. Anime movies may typically have a larger budget per screen minute than a series, but it still isn't enough to justify that.


You are surprisingly wrong once again, a lot of movie theaters in other parts of the world have subtitles in them for foreign languages.
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Posted 3/5/17

motokosuzumichan wrote:


TheAncientOne wrote:


RoachSandeson wrote:

I've just been wondering why do the Americans speak Japanese all the time, you think they would speak English especially to each other. The Japanese could simply add subtitles for the English parts.

They do so for the same reason that most Hollywood movies are dubbed for the Japanese market; The majority of the audience doesn't want to read subtitles.

If you've seen enough anime to see examples where they actually had people from the U.S. speaking English for any length of time, you'd also note that it is usually done by non-native speakers. Even when done relatively well (i.e., the Guadalcana arc of Zipang) it isn't great, and more often any prolonged dialog promotes a "What the heck is that?" reaction from native English speakers (i.e. the first episode of Kashimashi: Girl Meets Girl).

Even in cases where they have someone that speaks English, those in charge of the production also seem to have sometimes not been interested in any input on proper phrasing, etc.. This makes sense when you consider that their primary market is in Japan, so it only has to pass that standard.

About the only way you'd see a production with both proper English and Japanese would be if it were a co-production, and the English speaking parts were handled by a U.S. studio using voice actors here. Anime movies may typically have a larger budget per screen minute than a series, but it still isn't enough to justify that.


You are surprisingly wrong once again, a lot of movie theaters in other parts of the world have subtitles in them for foreign languages.


Let's try not to shit on each other but could you perhaps provide some examples of this. Just to be specific are you saying that a country like for example Germany is more willing to put in native-English speakers and provide German subtitles?
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57 / M / U.S.A. (mid-south)
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Posted 3/5/17

motokosuzumichan wrote:

You are surprisingly wrong once again, a lot of movie theaters in other parts of the world have subtitles in them for foreign languages.

I said nothing about theatres in "other parts of the world", only in Japan.
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24 / M / MI
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Posted 3/5/17 , edited 3/6/17
Assassination Classroom season 2 had an episode where they spoke with people on the ISS and several of them were native english speakers.

And the cast spoke rather good english back to them. It was a rare thing to see in anime.

Also the K-On! movie took place in London and in typical KyoAni-fashion, they went all-out and hired actual London-ese folk to play the English characters and had Japanese subtitles for them.


It was amazing.
LokiLB 
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Posted 3/5/17
Not sure about anime, but live action movies have actually done that satisfactorily. Fearless is one of my favorite movies in this regard. It has characters speaking some flavor of Chinese, Japanese, English, and maybe French. The characters speaking English are clearly native speakers. The entire thing is subtitled.
The more recent movie The Great Wall also has everyone speak their respective language and just subtitled what wasn't in English for the US release.

Really wish they'd gotten someone who was actually bilingual for the US rep in Shin Godzilla. Tha actress's English was cringey.

It would be cool if anime did that as well. But as previously mentioned, I think it would require collaboration between the anime studio and someone elsewhere like the US.
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25 / M / Chaldea Security...
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Posted 3/5/17
I really liked Beck: Mongolian Chop Squad with this. Their Engrish felt kind of natural if that makes any sense.
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Posted 3/5/17

HopexLight wrote:

I really liked Beck: Mongolian Chop Squad with this. Their Engrish felt kind of natural if that makes any sense.


I agree. Beck did it pretty well. I've seen many more cases where it had all the problems TheAncientOne points out. When it's just a few lines here and there I don't really mind, and that's been mostly what I've seen. In a show where there would be a lot of dialogue happening in English in "real life" I'd rather see it all done in Japanese than an attempt at verisimilitude that actually results in bad acting or obviously Japanese-accented English.
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31 / M / Glendale, AZ
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Posted 3/5/17
When it comes to having an American in anime, scenes where this is extensive use of English (like a paragraph length), that is the sub can be bad and the dub be better (for that scene).
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Posted 3/5/17
If it makes sense in the context, dub and sub should definitely mix. One of the my favorite examples is from Ping Pong the Animation; though in this case, it was Japanese mixed with Chinese. During numerous scenes, Wenge and his coach spoke in Chinese. Being a Chinese ping pong player, who never planned on going to Japan, Wenge mostly spoke Chinese (and gradually became more familiar with Japanese). That made a lot of sense. Being more experienced/older, the coach was able to fluently speak in Japanese and Chinese. The Chinese talk wasn't necessary, but it added another layer of immersion to that series.
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Posted 3/5/17
Someone - a fan, obviously, not official - did a cut of Code Geass where they had the Japanese audio where they would be speaking Japanese and the English audio where they would be speaking English. That was pretty cool.

But yeah, I would love to see them mix more, since I love both sets of voice actors.
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